PDA

View Full Version : Is this plausible?



The_Ink_Goddess
01-16-2011, 04:29 AM
In my YA, a girl is drugged with GHB (?) and collapses in the bathroom. My MC finds her and calls an ambulance. They're both eighteen. She's taken to the emergency room where she's treated.

Just to check: does anyone know what the side effects would be? This happened to a friend of a distant friend (she didn't get hurt), and all that happened was her heart rate was all over the place.

But my main question is that, during the treatment, my MC steps outside and the police have been called. They tell her that the girl - who they assume is her friend, and she does nothing to correct them - was drugged with GHB/something of that nature, and ask her about it - if she saw anyone give it to her, etc. Basically, is this plausible? Would the police be called, and would they just approach someone they assume is a friend like this? Is there anything I should bear it mind?

P.S. It's really late here. Forgive the potential incoherence of this.

Drachen Jager
01-16-2011, 08:56 AM
Police don't release details of the crime unless they see some benefit. I'd think it quite unlikely that they would explain why they were asking what she was drinking and if anybody could have slipped something into her drink. Although, an astute person could figure it out.

They would not assume she was a friend, they would ask her what her about her relationship.

RJK
01-16-2011, 08:42 PM
Police rarely give information. They collect it. If your character brought the victim to the hospital, the police would question her. The first questions would establish her relationship to the victim. The next would be about how the victim was drugged. If the hospital has a quick test for GHB (they probably do), the police would want to know all they could about the victim's activities prior to the trip to the hospital. Anything the other character could supply would help.

HopeWelsh
01-16-2011, 11:33 PM
They would definitely ask the friend what happened. Knowing it was GHB, they'd ask if anyone was around her drink, yes.

GHBs main side-effect is memory loss.

cornetto
01-17-2011, 12:04 AM
Even if the cops don't tell the MC that her friend was drugged, she should be able to figure it out just by the nature of the questions. Hopefully an 18 yo girl would know about date rape drugs.

Sydneyd
01-17-2011, 03:32 AM
I was in a similar situation and the cops were information gatherers. They didnt offer anything, but I was not very close to the victim, and they still approached me for information, however this happened a few days after the incident. That could make the difference.

Rowan
01-17-2011, 05:32 AM
In my YA, a girl is drugged with GHB (?) and collapses in the bathroom. My MC finds her and calls an ambulance. They're both eighteen. She's taken to the emergency room where she's treated.

Just to check: does anyone know what the side effects would be? This happened to a friend of a distant friend (she didn't get hurt), and all that happened was her heart rate was all over the place.
...snip



Just a side note. I have a rape scene in my latest WIP and researched the usual candidates (GHB, Rohypnol, ketamine, etc.). If you're going to go with GHB, you might want to reconsider the heart rate "all over the place" (I took that to mean it was 'elevated' but I may be misinterpreting you here :) ):

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drugs_concern/ghb/ghb.htm


Low doses of GHB produce drowsiness, nausea, and visual distortion. At high doses, GHB overdose can result in unconsciousness, seizures, slowed heart rate, severe respiratory depression, decreased body temperature, vomiting, nausea, coma, or death. Sustained use of GHB can lead to addiction. Chronic abuse of GHB produces a withdrawal syndrome characterized by insomnia, anxiety, tremors, marked autonomic activation (i.e., increased heart rate and blood pressure) and occasional psychotic thoughts. Currently, there is no antidote available for GHB overdose.


http://www.911rape.org/rape-drugs/ghb/effects-of-ghb


Effects of GHB
GHB is a powerful synthetic drug that has euphoric and sedative effects. It acts as depressant on the central nervous system. It is rapidly metabolized by the body. The effects of the drug can be felt within fifteen to twenty minutes after ingestion.

GHB can cause dizziness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, seizures, respiratory depression, and intense drowsiness. In some cases, GHB causes unconsciousness or coma. As a result, you may not be able to recall what happened to you while you were under the influence of the drug.

When GHB is ingested with alcohol or other drugs, the consequences may be life threatening. Without immediate and appropriate medical care, the results may be fatal.

Several characteristics of GHB make it especially dangerous: First, it takes a very small amount (e.g., a few drops, a capful) to have a big effect. It is easy to overdose. Second, when GHB is used alone, or when it is mixed with alcohol and other drugs, it may cause death. Third, most of the GHB being used today is the "homegrown" variety. It is made by non-professionals in their own "street labs," kitchens, or bathtubs by mixing various chemical ingredients. There may be significant differences in the purity, concentration, and potency of various batches. The same amount taken from two separate batches may have very different effects.

chuckgalle
01-18-2011, 09:29 PM
Just adding another voice that the cops, who would be called, aren't likely to offer info but will ask much.