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mgencleyn
12-22-2010, 01:25 PM
I have a small book I want to POD privately. So I'm trying to format the pages like the published trade paperbacks.

I've tried Microsoft Works and OpenOffice. I still don't know how to format the header. OpenOffice lets me mirror page numbers, but I have no option to skip a header on chapter pages and early pages. The only option I have is to include a header for every page other than the first. This is getting frustrating. Works keeps the page number on one side or the other, so that's out. What can I do?

mgencleyn
12-22-2010, 02:28 PM
Eh, actually, I guess I'm looking for page layout software. I think. Right now I'm checking out Scribus. Looks promising.

tirial
12-22-2010, 03:41 PM
If you have MSWord it can do most of the basic formatting you would need, but I'm not familiar with Works.

In Open Office you can skip the header on the early pages by using a different style for those pages - try Using Custom Styles (http://documentation.openoffice.org/manuals/oooauthors2/0207WG-WorkingWithStyles.pdf) in the OpenOffice documentation

mgencleyn
12-22-2010, 04:36 PM
Meh, I've worked at styles in OOO, and I've never been able to get them to cooperate. I'm amazed how difficult it is to make OOO to just do what I need.

kurzon
12-29-2010, 09:39 AM
Does Open Office not have section breaks? My understanding was it did most of the things MS Word did, in which case it should have section breaks. In MS Word section breaks can be inserted using the Insert menu.

Do this:

Set your document to use mirror margins.

Create your title page and/or copyright page. Neither of these pages generally need headers. Insert a section break (next page section break) at the end of your copyright page.

After the section break is inserted, set up the header/footer of the new section (the section which is chapter one of your book).

First make sure that the header/footers are not set to duplicate the header/footer in your first section. In MS Word you can do this by going into the header/footer and toggling off a button called "Same as Previous" on the header/footer toolbar (which is only visible when you're in the header/footer).

Once that is done, set up your header/footer by selecting 'Different First Page' in your page options, then creating the headers for the pages which are not the first page. You will need to create a header/footer for the odd pages, and a header/footer for the even pages.

Go to the end of chapter one and insert another section break. This time you don't need to toggle off the same as previous header/footer, as you want it to be the same as previous (unless you're being extra fancy and doing the chapter headings in the header). The page numbering should automatically continue from the previous section, but if it doesn't go into the page number options and select "Continue numbering".

Repeat for each chapter.

I've never used Open Office, but my understanding is that it's near identical to MS Word 2000.

DoctorMandaBenson
01-02-2011, 02:41 AM
If you want it to look as professional as possible, the software you need is Adobe Indesign (the industry standard). It's doable with Microsoft Word; I think Aaron Shepard's blog has some information on it. http://www.newselfpublishing.com/blog/

zpeteman
01-02-2011, 03:34 AM
InDesign. Anything else and you are just begging for frustration.

Axler
01-02-2011, 04:58 AM
InDesign. Anything else and you are just begging for frustration.

Absolutely.

mgencleyn
01-02-2011, 10:35 PM
Yuck. It's looks good, but the price is yuck. I downloaded the trial and will see happens. Thanks, everyone.

kurzon
01-03-2011, 02:23 AM
As for InDesign - if you want proper kerning and you don't know how to use MS Word well, then it's definitely a primary option.

Medievalist
01-03-2011, 02:26 AM
As for InDesign - if you want proper kerning and you don't know how to use MS Word well, then it's definitely a primary option.

It's also pretty complex.

If you don't know how to use MS Word or Word Perfect well, then a professional level typesetting and layout program is not a light thing to learn.

It assumes you already know the basics of typesetting and design. I would think very carefully about spending the money. You might do better to hire someone, or read about what's possible with MSWord.

kurzon
01-03-2011, 09:14 AM
Yup - I only use MS Word, but I'm an advanced Word user (and I am not so particular about kerning).

DoctorMandaBenson
01-03-2011, 03:48 PM
Yuck. It's looks good, but the price is yuck. I downloaded the trial and will see happens. Thanks, everyone.

If you know what you are doing and you only want to do one book, it's probably doable using the 1-month trial. I made a trailer for a book using a trial of Adobe Flash. I had all the artwork prepared and the sequence planned beforehand, and I taught myself Flash and put the thing together in the month. I looked and looked beforehand, but none of the free software for making Flash was good enough.

Jack Newcastle
01-06-2011, 06:29 AM
Go with InDesign. Set up your Master pages, margins, and text frames. And remember, Optical Kerning and Optical Margin Alignment are your friends. Oh, and be sure to TURN OFF LIGATURES!!!! Unless you want ligatures, but even for an old-fashioned guy, I don't like them. Oh and don't forget your justification and leading.

Word Spacing: 95%, 100%, 105%
Letter Spacing: -5%, 0%, 5%
Glyph Scaling: 98%, 100%, 102%

Other things: look up 'Baselines' and set accordingly. I lost about a month of man-hours because I didn't know about this.

Regards,

Jack

LovetoWrite
01-07-2011, 06:22 AM
Just a word about InDesign. Try your community college, I found that our local community college offers a basic course as a non-credit class. The class isn't expensive either.
Just an FYI for those of us (like me) who would be lost trying to learn it on our own or feel it would be to daunting to try.

ColoradoMom
01-08-2011, 05:41 AM
You can also get an academic discount if you are a student or have a kid in school. I get a homeschool disocunt on all our software and it is sweet.

But as far as InDesign - way overkill if you ask me. It is good for printing to the proper PDF format and making covers and stuff - but I have Adobe Acrobat Pro Extended so making printer quality PDF's isn't a issue.

And you can get a free trial of flash videos on how to use InDesign here: http://www.vtc.com/

I use Word for all my books though - so much easier.

EmpoweredOKC
01-08-2011, 08:25 AM
InDesign C5 and training videos are the best writing investment I've ever made. Oh, and my Macbook.

mgencleyn
01-08-2011, 01:31 PM
You can also get an academic discount if you are a student or have a kid in school. I get a homeschool disocunt on all our software and it is sweet.

But as far as InDesign - way overkill if you ask me. It is good for printing to the proper PDF format and making covers and stuff - but I have Adobe Acrobat Pro Extended so making printer quality PDF's isn't a issue.

And you can get a free trial of flash videos on how to use InDesign here: http://www.vtc.com/

I use Word for all my books though - so much easier.

That's a very useful site.