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reph
10-04-2005, 10:27 AM
How would you write the plural of "stir-fry"?

Assume that "stirs-fry" is not an option.

JayEss
10-04-2005, 10:31 AM
How would you write the plural of "stir-fry"?

Assume that "stirs-fry" is not an option.

answers.com has it as STIR-FRIES

Optimus
10-04-2005, 10:51 AM
How would you write the plural of "stir-fry"?

Assume that "stirs-fry" is not an option.

Buffet.

mdin
10-04-2005, 10:53 AM
Stir-fries is correct.

Great. Now I'm hungry.

reph
10-04-2005, 11:17 AM
I asked because I saw "stir-frys" in a magazine article and thought it looked awful.

Pthom
10-04-2005, 12:41 PM
I don't understand why you'd ever want the plural of stir-fry in the first place. Stir-frying is a process: food is kept in constant motion in a hot pan with a little oil until cooked. The process is generic enough to be all-inclusive; it is silly to talk about it in the plural. Better to avoid the need altogether: "He ate nine stir-fried dishes" or "The restaurant serves more stir-fried dishes than any other."

Without a doubt, "stir-frys" is a misspelling, but here's one for you. I once edited a newsletter for fly fishers; they annually held an event where fishing flies were tied. There was an ongoing debate on how to spell the title of the event: Fly Tying vs. Fly Tieing. Merriam-Webster Online allows either spelling but prefers the former. Then, are those who tie flies tyers or tiers? Again, M-W says either, but prefers the latter (go figure). The organization decided that "tiers" was confusing and chose to talk about fly tyers. Then because "tieing" didn't match "tyers," those who assembled fur and feathers into fishing lures worked at fly tying.

And then there are those who make black-coloured marks on the kerb with their tyres.

*sigh*

rtilryarms
10-04-2005, 01:48 PM
I never saw anyone at McDonalds stir those stringy 'taters.

Moondancer
10-04-2005, 02:27 PM
Trying to put a plural or past tense on the word stir-fry is awkward since it is a a description of a process, not a verb. It would be the same as saying something like... the pretties butterfly.

pianoman5
10-04-2005, 02:31 PM
So many issues to consider.

On the face of it, stir-fries would seem to be the appropriate plural.

However, as 'fry' is a verb, and 'fries' appears to be a fabrication of the culinary anti-Christ and well-known imperialist conspiracy McDonalds, I'm obliged to resist acceptance of any linguistic usage according to that corporation's ersatz orthodoxy. (There: I used 'culinary' and 'McDonalds' in the same sentence -- such are the abominations that lie in wait for innocents in the 21st century.)

As a compound term, simply adding an 's' would make more sense. I can cope with 'stir-frys'. That's how I'd render it if I had to.

But if I were you, reph, when faced with a dilemma like this, I'd ask reph.

Maryn
10-04-2005, 09:14 PM
I can see times when you'd want to pluralize it.

"What'd you make for dinner?"

"Stir-fry."

"Oh. We have stir-fries too often."

Never mind that fry is a verb and all that. You know people pluralize it in casual conversation. So I'd side with those who'd spell it stir-fries.

Maryn, who'd also ask reph--of course!

oswann
10-04-2005, 09:19 PM
I asked because I saw "stir-frys" in a magazine article and thought it looked awful.


Probably tasted awful too.


Os.

JAlpha
10-04-2005, 09:22 PM
Trying to put a plural or past tense on the word stir-fry is awkward since it is a a description of a process, not a verb. It would be the same as saying something like... the pretties butterfly.

Merriam Webster's Collegiate 11th edition, is listing stir-fry as a verb & noun.

Stir-fries are the ultimate one-pan wonders.

trumancoyote
10-04-2005, 10:24 PM
For some reason, pluralizing 'stir-fry' hurts my face just as much as when people pluralize 'sushi' -- it just... shouldn't be done.

maestrowork
10-04-2005, 11:01 PM
Or fried rices or lo meins or spaghettis or lettuces. XO

reph
10-04-2005, 11:11 PM
This is the paragraph:


Garlic and onions: These contain plenty of phytochemicals called flavonoids, which help protect artery walls. . . . Add these vegetables to stir-frys and casseroles.

Another passage makes me go "Hmm, who edited this?"


Eat cold-water fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel to supply your body with omega-3 fats, a nutrient that helps keep blood platelets from sticking and may prevent potential heart attacks.

Sure. Let's all prevent potential heart attacks, and potential sinus infections, and potential death. Eat fats, a nutrient.

trumancoyote
10-04-2005, 11:15 PM
Teehee. Now I wanna write a bad scifi story wherein the main antagonist is known across the war-torn galaxy as: OM-EGAAA THREEEE FATS!

Moondancer
10-04-2005, 11:21 PM
This is the paragraph:



Garlic and onions: These contain plenty of phytochemicals called flavonoids, which help protect artery walls. . . . Add these vegetables to stir-frys and casseroles.

Another passage makes me go "Hmm, who edited this?"



Eat cold-water fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel to supply your body with omega-3 fats, a nutrient that helps keep blood platelets from sticking and may prevent potential heart attacks.

Sure. Let's all prevent potential heart attacks, and potential sinus infections, and potential death. Eat fats, a nutrient.

Sounds like somebody who was more worried about word count than writing quality.

reph
10-05-2005, 03:22 AM
Watership Down has a scene in which the protagonist rabbit is offered a taste of "the King's lettuces." (The king is also a rabbit.)

Then there's "our special this evening, served with a salad of mixed organic baby lettuces," not that writers can afford to eat at such places.

Pthom
10-05-2005, 06:55 AM
I can see times when you'd want to pluralize it.

snip

"Oh. We have stir-fries too often."

snip
I think this is one of those cases where the process becomes the name for the dish (see above) or the word "fries" brings to mind fast food (also see above). Using the same rule for other plural noun forms (see maestro above) I'd recast the dialogue this way:

"Oh. We have stir-fry too often."

"It's either that or more of those awful lunch meats."

"You mean 'that awful lunch meat' don't you?"

"Nah. We're all wrong."
_______________________

Tiaga
10-05-2005, 08:12 AM
How would you write the plural of "stir-fry"?

Assume that "stirs-fry" is not an option.


Chinese food.

reph
10-05-2005, 08:13 AM
...rice and sushi are words that don't change from singular to plural.
Those are special cases because they're mass nouns (stuff), not count nouns (things). A horticulturist might talk about introducing new rices into cultivation, but other than that, "rice" and "sushi" don't exactly have plurals.

Unique
10-05-2005, 04:15 PM
Those are special cases because they're mass nouns (stuff), not count nouns (things). A horticulturist might talk about introducing new rices into cultivation, but other than that, "rice" and "sushi" don't exactly have plurals.

You mean the plural of rice isn't reece?

And the plural of sushi isn't sheesh?

shucks.

Torin
10-05-2005, 04:54 PM
You mean the plural of rice isn't reece?
shucks.

Nope. Rice is the plural. The singular is rouse.

:D

rtilryarms
10-05-2005, 05:26 PM
This is the paragraph:



Garlic and onions: These contain plenty of phytochemicals called flavonoids, which help protect artery walls. . . . Add these vegetables to stir-frys and casseroles.

Another passage makes me go "Hmm, who edited this?"



Eat cold-water fish such as salmon, tuna, and mackerel to supply your body with omega-3 fats, a nutrient that helps keep blood platelets from sticking and may prevent potential heart attacks.

Sure. Let's all prevent potential heart attacks, and potential sinus infections, and potential death. Eat fats, a nutrient.

just seems like a lot of work to fit a word to a sentence. My teacher would make me adapt the sentence to the proper word:

//Add these vegetables to a stir-fry or casserole.//

rtilryarms
10-05-2005, 05:28 PM
There are rare sentences which fuzzy plurals work:

Is that goose with the geese the one that gooses the geese?

pconsidine
10-05-2005, 05:49 PM
To me, the copyeditor just chose the easiest pluralization rule she could find and used it. Since "stir-fry" (which incidentally probably shouldn't be hyphenated when used as a noun) doesn't have any established standard, and guidelines have come to favor simpler constructions, just tacking on an "s" makes perfect sense.


Edited to add: A simple "s" is probably preferable as a way to distinguish the present tense ("He stir-fries the snowpeas") from the plural noun ("he added peas to the stir fries"). In any case, rewriting the sentence is clearly the best approach.

rtilryarms
10-05-2005, 10:17 PM
Never mind. Corporate America shines light about the quandry. I just returned from a fast-food burger joint and noticed "French Fries" on the menu. recollecting that this certain romantic-language tasty treat has been part of our culture for generations, I hereby Ruminate that the spelling is proper despite the ostensible evidence to the contrary.


brb
[rt scurrying in wide circles, looking for a port-o-let]