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Carpinttas
12-17-2010, 08:37 PM
I needed to have some cool names for certain names that my characters use. The story is about lucid and shared dreams, so I need to know how to say these words in Latin (or some other cool language, ancient Greek, Japanese...)

lucid dreamer(s)
shared dream(s)
dream
fortress
bodyguard or protector
Crow
Wolf
Angel

Collectonian
12-17-2010, 09:28 PM
For Japanese, the ones I know:

Crow: karasu
Wolf: Ōkami
Angel: tenshi
Dream: yume (though this one can really depend on the context - yume is the general one for noun)

And some I'm fairly certain of
Fortress: toride
Lucid Dream: meisekimu

For bodyguard/protector, can you give more context?


If you want latin, this is one translator I used for some I dropped in one of my novels: http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?from=English&to=Latin

Tiger
12-17-2010, 10:25 PM
For Japanese, the ones I know:

Crow: karasu
Wolf: Ōkami
Angel: tenshi
Dream: yume (though this one can really depend on the context - yume is the general one for noun)

And some I'm fairly certain of
Fortress: toride
Lucid Dream: meisekimu

For bodyguard/protector, can you give more context?


If you want latin, this is one translator I used for some I dropped in one of my novels: http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_translators.php?from=English&to=Latin

I carry an omamori... Does that count?

Carpinttas
12-17-2010, 11:23 PM
great, thanks a lot! As for the bodyguard... well forget bodyguard, what I want is a name to call the agents specialized in fights and firearms. Any ideas?

oh, and how do you write Gifted and Gift in Japanese? It will be the code name for the ones with the psychic power of sharing dreams.

Lhun
12-18-2010, 01:32 AM
dream - Somnium
fortress - Arx or Castellum
bodyguard or protector - Protector (yeah, that was easy)
Crow - Cornix, can also mean raven
Wolf - Lupus
Angel - Angelicus

The problem with latin is that depending on the sentence, these words need to be declined. Which is even worse if you use more than one word.

lucid dreamer(s)
shared dream(s)
No real names for these two, to share would be Consociare and lucid might be something like Aperte.

Collectonian
12-18-2010, 06:26 AM
great, thanks a lot! As for the bodyguard... well forget bodyguard, what I want is a name to call the agents specialized in fights and firearms. Any ideas?

oh, and how do you write Gifted and Gift in Japanese? It will be the code name for the ones with the psychic power of sharing dreams.

Hmmm..gifted/gift would be more complex in that context. You could use kaminokudashitamoutamono, which is a "heavenly gift", but I think for this it would probably be choujouteki for a supernatural/paranormal event, and chounouryoku for psychic ability.

I think I'll have to leave the fighter one to someone a bit more advanced than me, as it is very nuanced from what I know of words in that area. If no one here can answer, you might want to post at AnimeOnDVD's Japanese language area (http://www.mania.com/aodvb/forumdisplay.php?f=29). Those guys are full blown speakers/students and usually where I go if I get stuck. :-D

Carpinttas
12-18-2010, 03:22 PM
ok, thanks!

WalkingContradiction
12-18-2010, 08:35 PM
'custos' works too for 'bodyguard or protector' in Latin. Especially if it's not necessarily about muscles, I can imagine it working for supernatural guidance if that's what you mean. But 'protectors' certainly works too. Edit: Never mind, I just saw the addendum about fire arms.. Hmm, I can only offer 'miles' for soldier, but that's not really what you're looking for..

And if you want to construct the words 'shared dream' and 'lucid dream' with Lhun's suggestions, you'd probably write

'somnium consociatum' for 'shared dream'
and 'somnium apertum' for 'lucid dream' (literally meaning something like 'open dream', but in certain contexts it can mean 'clear/lucid' so I think people would get it).

Carpinttas
12-18-2010, 10:07 PM
Thanks Walk.Contr. I will use 'sominum apertum' sounds pretty good. As for the bodyguard, I appreciate the help, but I'm not sure any more if I'll actually added them to the story. When I get to the part where they appear I'll decide.

Lhun
12-18-2010, 11:57 PM
Thanks Walk.Contr. I will use 'sominum apertum' sounds pretty good. As for the bodyguard, I appreciate the help, but I'm not sure any more if I'll actually added them to the story. When I get to the part where they appear I'll decide.Keep the declension in mind.
I.e. if the dream is the subject of a sentence it'd be somnium apertum (or apertum somnium) if it's the genitive object, it'd be somnii aperti, if it's plural it'd be somnii aperta, and so on. It's comparatively easy since both somnium and apertus (adjective for aperte) follow second declension.

Carpinttas
12-19-2010, 01:27 AM
Thanks Lhun, I was just going to ask about the plural form of 'open dream'... Are you a medium? :)
btw what's the declension of 'open dreamers'?

Rufus Coppertop
12-20-2010, 04:59 AM
You can add the suffix tor (masculine) or trix (feminine) to the supine stem of a verb to create a noun for the practitioner of the act.

somniator for male dreamer
somniatrix for female dreamer

add sciens which is the best translation for conscious. It makes life a little easier because the nominative form is the same for all genders.

somniator sciens - lucid dreamer (M)
somniatrix sciens - lucid dreamer (F)

As the direct object of a verb, they become somniatorem scientem or somniatricem scientem.

It could end up being a bit weird and clumsy if you start declining Latin nouns in the middle of English sentences though.


The arch enemy gave the somniator sciens a punch on the nose.

The arch enemy gave the somniatorem scientem a punch on the nose.

What if you just use "somniator" and let it be understood within the culture of your world that the lucidity part goes without saying?


The arch enemy gave the somniator a punch on the nose.

In this case, you let English word order clue the reader in as to whether the somniator is subject, object or whatever. For example, nobody declines "dictator" when using it in English.

Carpinttas
12-20-2010, 04:43 PM
Good post, Rufus, thanks

Lhun
12-20-2010, 04:51 PM
It could end up being a bit weird and clumsy if you start declining Latin nouns in the middle of English sentences though.I agree with that. As long as it gets used as a kind of technical term in an english sentence it's probably better not to decline them. But if its part of a latin sentence, or in other context it should be declined. Well, and of course the adjective in all adjective + noun combinations.