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Jeanette
12-08-2010, 02:32 AM
In my new WIP, my main character is an insurance claims investigator. Of course, I don't know anything about the day-to-day about this job and wanted any insight from someone who does.

What's your main goal? Do you start each case the same way? What is the day-to-day? When is it most exciting? Does it pay well? Is it stressful?

Anything you can share will be great.

Thanks!
Rachel

Drachen Jager
12-08-2010, 02:47 AM
I don't know much about it but I think it would depend largely on what type of insurance.

Auto, home, health or loss of employment would all have their own systems for investigation. I think each would be very different from the others.

Jeanette
12-08-2010, 02:59 AM
You're right, Drachen. I'll be more specific. My character would be investigating a possible arson of their home.

R.

whacko
12-08-2010, 03:04 AM
Hi Jeanette,

The first thing that would alert your MC to the arson would be a Fire Report - cause of fire, use of accelerants etc. But unless he was a specialist it'd probably be the fire department or the police who would let him/her know.

Regards

Whacko

jclarkdawe
12-08-2010, 03:18 AM
I have a trunked novel about an insurance investigator. One problem it had is that the protagonist's job is about as exciting as a wart at a toad festival. But if you want to read the manuscript, send me a PM with your email address and you're more than happy to read it.


In my new WIP, my main character is an insurance claims investigator. Of course, I don't know anything about the day-to-day about this job and wanted any insight from someone who does.

What's your main goal? Your main job is to reduce claims against your insurance company, making sure that claims are valid, and trying to control fraud.

Do you start each case the same way? Most cases start with your boss telling you to investigate a claim that for some reason has caused concerns. You may also investigate claims where the investigators see a pattern that appears to be connected to fraud. Your starting point on the investigation is the claim submitted by the policy holder and the report by the insurance agent.

What is the day-to-day? Day-to-day involves just checking facts. For instance, person claims his gold necklace that was stolen was worth $10,000. Can he prove it? Does the paperwork match up? Most of the work is done in an office, over the telephone and internet.

When is it most exciting? Probably when you discover how a new scam works.

Does it pay well? Reasonable, although what you're bringing to the table matters. Accounting as a background helps, specialized training in areas like art, construction, shipping, are helpful and increase your pay.

Is it stressful? Probably not that often. Most of the work is done in the office.

Anything you can share will be great.

Thanks!
Rachel

Not an insurance investigator, but I did a fair amount of research on the subject and talked with a couple.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Stanmiller
12-08-2010, 03:58 AM
Hey, why not a hotshot investigator for an insurance company? Say the guy (gal) is the world's best former art thief, and now he's the go-to guy for Amalgamated Worldwide Insurance whenever millions in art disappears...wait...didn't the movie Thomas Crown Affair do just that with Faye Dunaway and Steve McQueen?

Sounds a bit more exciting than Jim's wart at a frog fest, IMO.

Dunno how you could revamp that into an arson investigation.

Jeanette
12-09-2010, 09:47 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions. It's got me to thinkin...

RJK
12-12-2010, 09:00 PM
We had a small kitchen fire. The investigator who came to our house gave us an estimate for repairs and replacement of the damaged cabinets, as well as cleanup of the smoke damage. I thought it was more than fair.

He did mention that our names would be entered into a database that would be checked by any investigator, against any future fire claims. They are careful about people trying to remodel their homes at the expense of the insurance companies