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Soothing Snow
11-22-2010, 01:00 AM
One of my characters killed a buck and is interrupted by a heavy rain fall. The buck is laying in the rain for awhile before he takes it to a dryer area. It's pretty cold and he's too cold to do anything with it 'til the morning. Is it possible it can spoil? Would the hide still be usable?

Thanks!


~Snow

Drachen Jager
11-22-2010, 01:04 AM
Nah, it's fine for a few days, as long as he dresses it appropriately (no I don't mean in a black evening gown).

Hanging meat at low, but not freezing, temperatures is commonly done to age the meat, I believe four days is considered ideal for deer. You don't want to leave it sitting on the ground for too long but 12 hours shouldn't do any harm.

sunandshadow
11-22-2010, 01:07 AM
Typically the cold keeps things from spoiling, although I've never seen a hunter let cold deter them from dressing a kill. Depending on how he killed it, it probably only has one or two small holes in it, so it's not going to be getting a lot of water and mud into the meat. The important thing is that he slit the throat and hang the carcass (in a tree or at his house) so the blood drains out (and other animals don't eat it). If it's refrigerator-cold anything else could wait.

Soothing Snow
11-22-2010, 01:11 AM
Thanks guys!

It was killed with an arrow btw.

I feel embarressed to ask but..... what do you do with the hide? How do you make it so it's usable? Like to wear and use for equipment? Thanks again:tongue

Drachen Jager
11-22-2010, 10:09 AM
http://www.state.tn.us/twra/pdfs/tanninghides.pdf

All you need to know.

Soothing Snow
11-22-2010, 10:16 AM
Thank you!:)



~Snow

GeorgeK
11-22-2010, 04:33 PM
The most important thing, even more than hanging or cutting the throat is gutting it. That's the source of bacteria that will spoil the meat. Ideally the animal should be gutted within one hour. By then is when the bacteria are getting out of the gut and tracking up the blood vessels. Also if you have to delay the butchering, don't skin it. The skin is skin tight and already designed to keep out bacteria. Hanging will help it stay cleaner and if hanging high enough will prevent critters from getting to it, but from a purely culinary standpoint isn't absolutely a must. Drachen alluded to this in the "dressing", but it depends on which author you read whether dressing includes skinning.

If you do delay skinning for such a reason you will want to wait until rigor mortis is over. Trying to skin an animal that is in rigor is much more difficult. A deer will be easier than a boar since deer have less connective tissue holding the skin in place, but still. The heavy rain (as well as the cold) will also keep flies off it. Whenever possible I prefer to butcher in dry cold.

Chase
11-27-2010, 10:36 PM
Most hunter education courses teach "slitting the throat" is useless on a dead big animal and actually spoils meat by allowing access to dirt and insect.

Minutes after the heart stops beating, blood will not "drain." At this point, the hunter would need a mechanical pump and replacement chemical.

Throat-slitting is the usual process for killing and bleeding out farm animals whose hearts still beat and will pump out arterial blood for a short time.

An exception in hunting is the big game animal still "alive" from a shot not immediately fatal. Such rarely happens with an arrow, the main job of which is to kill by internal bleeding.

On most big game, slitting the throat only soils good meat (as does remaining wet for and considerable time). As said, cold is good for preserving meat.

Fenika
11-27-2010, 10:59 PM
The most important thing, even more than hanging or cutting the throat is gutting it. That's the source of bacteria that will spoil the meat. Ideally the animal should be gutted within one hour. By then is when the bacteria are getting out of the gut and tracking up the blood vessels. Also if you have to delay the butchering, don't skin it. The skin is skin tight and already designed to keep out bacteria. Hanging will help it stay cleaner and if hanging high enough will prevent critters from getting to it, but from a purely culinary standpoint isn't absolutely a must. Drachen alluded to this in the "dressing", but it depends on which author you read whether dressing includes skinning.

If you do delay skinning for such a reason you will want to wait until rigor mortis is over. Trying to skin an animal that is in rigor is much more difficult. A deer will be easier than a boar since deer have less connective tissue holding the skin in place, but still. The heavy rain (as well as the cold) will also keep flies off it. Whenever possible I prefer to butcher in dry cold.

George beat me to it once again. I would add that not gutting it, aside from a massive bacterial issue, will keep the back muscles and other areas piping hot for hours (especially on a large animal, even in the cold). They have all that insulation for a reason, and the gut is just a big fermentation vat in these beasts.


Most hunter education courses teach "slitting the throat" is useless on a dead big animal and actually spoils meat by allowing access to dirt and insect.

Minutes after the heart stops beating, blood will not "drain." At this point, the hunter would need a mechanical pump and replacement chemical.

Throat-slitting is the usual process for killing and bleeding out farm animals whose hearts still beat and will pump out arterial blood for a short time.

An exception in hunting is the big game animal still "alive" from a shot not immediately fatal. Such rarely happens with an arrow, the main job of which is to kill by internal bleeding.

On most big game, slitting the throat only soils good meat (as does remaining wet for and considerable time). As said, cold is good for preserving meat.

Not totally true. Blood flow/drainage will slow significantly after the heat stops, but all those major vessels can still hold and release a ton of blood. Yes, there's nothing pumping it along, but gravity an an opening in a major vessel(s) can do wonders.

And rather than slitting ear to ear, you need only jab the jugular AND carotid. You can do this after you've dragged it somewhere, but if you do it before, just cut off the area of meat around the area you've contaminated with your open wound.

Funny enough, it's easy to hang an animal after it's gutted but it's easier to gut an animal (imo) after it's hanging.

PattiTheWicked
11-27-2010, 11:17 PM
It also depends on where your character killed the animal. My husband just got back from a two week hunt in Wyoming, and there wasn't a damn tree in sight. They had to gut their antelope and mule deer where they fell.

Also, it's important to remember that no matter what the weather, predators can present a problem if you leave a kill overnight. My nephew got a buck last week, but it ran onto another property. They couldn't get permission from the landowner until the next day to go onto the land, and when they found the buck, coyotes had gotten it. Nothing left but some bones and the head.

Chase
11-29-2010, 04:54 AM
Not totally true. Blood flow/drainage will slow significantly after the heat stops, but all those major vessels can still hold and release a ton of blood. Yes, there's nothing pumping it along, but gravity an an opening in a major vessel(s) can do wonders.

Your facts are true with very fresh kills. Cold or coagulation slow blood draining from dead animals greatly. I don't bow hunt, but have helped archers find game shot well through the lungs. After the recommended 30-minute wait to track (to allow the animal to stop sooner), we have often tracked for hours. No need to cut the throat, but the upside is that the chest cavity is full of coagulated blood, easily scooped out.


And rather than slitting ear to ear, you need only jab the jugular AND carotid. You can do this after you've dragged it somewhere, but if you do it before, just cut off the area of meat around the area you've contaminated with your open wound.

Your surgical jab is preferred, even for totally incapacitated animals with still-beating hearts. During the removal of the heart-lung, such a precise jab is also recommended at the vocal cords to ease pulling out the attached trachea and esophagus without cutting up the neck.


Funny enough, it's easy to hang an animal after it's gutted but it's easier to gut an animal (imo) after it's hanging.

Too true. As I became older and lazier, my hunting knapsack included a lightweight pulley system made of 550 cord. Even with the upper body partially elevated, gutting is usually much cleaner and safer.