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aka eraser
09-29-2005, 06:43 PM
I went back a few pages but couldn't find a similar thread so....

I'm in the middle of Dan Simmons' Ilium and am really enjoying it. It's my first foray back into SF in quite some time but I enjoyed his Hyperion and Endymion books so picked this one up. It's almost impossible to summarize - a wild, rollercoaster of a novel involving mechs, humans, post-humans and Greek gods. Highly recommended.

Recently read and enjoyed J.V. Jones' A Fortress of Grey Ice, the second in her Sword of Shadows series. It felt a bit rushed at the end. I could sense her publisher tapping his watch and glaring but I still intend to read the next one. Just hope she doesn't decide to Jordanize the series.

What's got you flipping pages?

PattiTheWicked
09-29-2005, 09:56 PM
Just finished up Stephen King's "On Writing" for the second time, and was reminded again of why I love some of his work so much. Also wrapping up a re-read of "Pride and Prejudice" -- I'm feeling very Jane Austenish lately so I might start back in on "Persuasion" as well.

And I'm muddling my way through Edward Rutherfurd's "London," which I found on sale at Half Price Books. I've never read it before but I really liked "Sarum," so I thought I'd give it a shot. And finally, I'm reading "America's Women" by Gail Collins, which is pretty neat.

Shwebb
09-29-2005, 10:04 PM
Just finished up Stephen King's "On Writing" for the second time, and was reminded again of why I love some of his work so much.

Thanks, Patti, for bringing up that book. I'm leaving for Charleston, SC early Saturday for a week, and I need to take something to read--I've got that book somewhere, and it's time for a reread. We also hit the B & N when we're down there. So, any suggestions on some good reads? My favorite author to read at the beach, David Sedaris, doesn't have a book out this year that I know of.

Hopefully, my husband will buy the "pregnancy card" I'm laying on the table, and he'll be the kid chaser. :)

threedogpeople
09-29-2005, 10:20 PM
I'm reading Dean Koontz's Cold Fire. A good read considering that it is "junkfood for the mind". I'm also working my way through Michelangelo and The Pope's Ceiling, but have been taking some breaks with less ponderous reads.

brokenfingers
09-29-2005, 11:13 PM
I finished A Fortress of Grey Ice not too long ago. I enjoyed it also but thought it wasn't as good as the first one. It seemed like there was too much "water-paddling" if you know what I mean. The story didn't advance at a satisfactory pace for me. I heard she's having some kind of problem, health maybe, and that's why the books are taking so long to come out.

Fiction I'm currently reading:

An Archer's Tale by Bernard Cornwell - Historical set during the Hundred Years War. Pretty good and I'm almost done.

The Sword and the Scimitar by David Ball - Another historical - Crusades and the Siege of Malta.

Earth Abides by George R. Stewart - Post-apocalyptic novel.

Recently finished The Darkness That Comes Before by R Scott Bakker (Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing series) Beginning third and last third were great. Middle kind of sagged. Still would recommend.

Saanen
09-29-2005, 11:13 PM
We just had a cold front move through and it's pleasantly fallish today, so I'm in my fall reading mood--Agatha Christie and Dracula, mostly. I'm halfway through Christie's Elephants Can Remember and about to reread Dracula, probably tonight so I can go to bed faintly spooked. :)

Gogonith
09-29-2005, 11:18 PM
I'm reading Dune (Book I). It's amazing I haven't 'til now, though I've seen the movies. Herbert had a truly incredible way of capturing political scheming, and an imagination that rivaled any other author I've read (Tolkein included, even).

Pthom
09-29-2005, 11:28 PM
I'm racing through Cory Doctorow. Read his latest: Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town first; then read his 1st: Down and Out in the Magic Kindom; and now I'm halfway through his 2nd: Eastern Standard Tribe. Doctorow has a fresh, youthful style that I envy. Reading stuff like this excites me to get my butt back in the chair and finish my WIPs.

(Yeah, plural :Shrug: )

emeraldcite
09-30-2005, 01:36 AM
i've been reading some allen steele (the coyote novels) and jack mcdevitt (books in the omega cloud series)

great writers!

Cabinscribe
09-30-2005, 05:25 AM
Just finishing "Reflections in a Golden Eye", by Carson McCullers.

OneTeam OneDream
09-30-2005, 05:29 AM
I am trying to get through Dean Koontz's ODD THOMAS. My wife loved it, and kept telling me over and over and over to read it. I picked it up, and quite honestly, if he was a first time author, I don't think it would have ever been published. I'm trying to give it a chance, but it is boring the **** out of me.

KTC
09-30-2005, 02:29 PM
Canscribe...I love Carson McCullers. I don't know what it is...I just love her.


I'm reading The Good People of New York by THISBE NISSEN...and enjoying it.

triceretops
09-30-2005, 03:04 PM
I'm fighting my way through the 1,300-page King novel The Stand. I wish I had the edited down version, because this thing sure needs editing down. Apparently this edtion came about because Stephen wanted to expand on his characters. I actually think it was the original manuscript and his editor chopped it, then it got popular, then they went for the whole Schmoe.

Tri

PattiTheWicked
09-30-2005, 04:32 PM
Thanks, Patti, for bringing up that book. I'm leaving for Charleston, SC early Saturday for a week, and I need to take something to read--I've got that book somewhere, and it's time for a reread. We also hit the B & N when we're down there.

I love Charleston -- lived there for about ten years. My younger stepdaughter still lives down there. Have you ever been down there during Spoleto?

Good beach read: Possession by AS Byatt. It's a "literary mystery" of sorts, and if you haven't read it, I highly recommend it. It's one of those books that sucks you in, and the next thing you know you look at the clock and it's four hours later and your kids are hungry and you've burned the soup.

Shwebb
09-30-2005, 05:20 PM
No, Patti, I'm not into Italian food that much. :ROFL:

Seriously, we always go to Charleston in the fall because we can rent a condo on the beach for cheap, avoid the tourists, and we love the drive through Fancy Gap this time of year--with the leaves changing. Our favorite place is Sullivan's Island because it's so residential we can fantasize about living there, but we usually stay somewhere on Isle of Palms.

My sister-in-law lives there--she's a massage therapist at Charleston Place. She's worked on a few celebrities, and when she tells me who some of her clients have been, I always want to know if they have any distinguishing scars or tattoos.

I just checked our local library's online catalog, and they have Possession--but only on video, not as a book. (I almost always prefer the book to the movie.) But I'll check at B&N when I get down there. My mother-in-law is also going to be staying, (actually all of my hubby's family but one sister!) so I'll let her take care of the soup!

Jamesaritchie
09-30-2005, 06:04 PM
I am trying to get through Dean Koontz's ODD THOMAS. My wife loved it, and kept telling me over and over and over to read it. I picked it up, and quite honestly, if he was a first time author, I don't think it would have ever been published. I'm trying to give it a chance, but it is boring the **** out of me.

Different tastes. I think Odd Thomas is one of Koontz's best books. I wasn't bored for a second.

azbikergirl
09-30-2005, 06:15 PM
Melusine by first-timer Sarah Monette. I'm enjoying it, but it's a slow read because, well, I get annoyed with some of the things she does and it throws me out of the story again and again and again... The story itself is great, though.

victoriastrauss
09-30-2005, 09:03 PM
Recently finished The Darkness That Comes Before by R Scott Bakker (Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing series) Beginning third and last third were great. Middle kind of sagged. Still would recommend.Pick up the next one, The Warrior Prophet. It's just as big, but it's much tighter. Very impressive.

I recently finished Charles Coleman Finlay's The Prodigal Troll, which I'd recommend. It's definitely not your standard fantasy--kind of a riff on the Tarzan story, but not at all derivative.

I'm currently reading Thoughts Without a Thinker by Mark Epstein--about psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective. And I'm just about to start Michael Cunningham's Specimen Days, which has been highly recommended to me. Loved The Hours, but I haven't been able to get through any of his other books.

- Victoria

victoriastrauss
09-30-2005, 09:07 PM
Different tastes. I think Odd Thomas is one of Koontz's best books. I wasn't bored for a second.Yeah. I loved it too. I wasn't sure at first--it's written in an exaggeratedly simple style, and initially I found it mannered and self-conscious. But it really grew on me, and I found the ending very moving. It's one of those books that stays with you afterward.

- Victoria

MacAllister
09-30-2005, 09:25 PM
Now see, Tri--I thought the edited-down version of The Stand was choppy and much less coherent. I found the novel vastly improved with the additional 300 pages, or so.

I'm currently reading Dungeon, Fire and Sword: The Knights Templar in the Crusades. (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0871316579/104-2093148-4830333?v=glance)

The Library Journal review pans it, stating pretty accurately:
Based entirely on secondary sources, many of them dated, rife with inaccurate and misleading information, this is not a sound treatment of either the crusades or the Templars. The general reader for whom the book is intended will learn more from Karen Armstrong's Holy War: The Crusades and Their Impact on Today's World ( LJ 2/15/91). Not recommended.

Marcusthefish
09-30-2005, 11:21 PM
I'm reading John C. Wright's The Golden Age. It's a very ornate space opera from 2002 that got great reviews.

So far (about 70 pp. in), it's an impressive attempt to imagine humanity in the far-future (like John Clute's Appleseed, but much more comprehensible). The plot really hasn't gotten started yet.

MTF

clintl
10-01-2005, 01:19 AM
Tribes of California by Stephen Powers (research material for what I hope will someday be a big writing project). I'm almost finished.

Ebelie
10-03-2005, 09:19 AM
I'm reading John C. Wright's The Golden Age. It's a very ornate space opera from 2002 that got great reviews.

So far (about 70 pp. in), it's an impressive attempt to imagine humanity in the far-future (like John Clute's Appleseed, but much more comprehensible). The plot really hasn't gotten started yet.

MTF

Speaking of humanity in the far future, I'm currently wandering dazed and confused through Gene Wolfe's The Book of the New Sun. I'm nearing the end and I still don't know what's going on, yet I'm finding it very difficult to put down.

In my spare time I'm reading a random Agatha Christie, greatly enjoying rereading Georgette Heyer's These Old Shades and struggling with Manchu, by Robert Elegant (I'm almost ready to give up on this one :confused: ).

brinkett
10-03-2005, 03:38 PM
I just finished Iris Johansen's Firestorm -- not one of her best efforts.

I'm about to start Minette Walters' The Tinder Box. I used to read everything by Walters, but gave up on her a couple of books back because her books were a little too disturbing for me. I picked this one up because of its size--if I put it down, I'm not wasting as much money. Has anyone seen this book in stores? It can't be more than 40-50,000 words long.

ETA: Just started reading the book, and the Author's Note says it's a promotional suspense novella written for 1999 Book Week in the Netherlands. That explains the short length.

Magna
10-03-2005, 07:22 PM
I'm currently 1/4 of the way through Winters Heart (Wheel of Time book 8) by Robert Jordan. Darn! Why did I have to get hooked on this series?

Marcusthefish
10-03-2005, 09:34 PM
Speaking of humanity in the far future, I'm currently wandering dazed and confused through Gene Wolfe's The Book of the New Sun. I'm nearing the end and I still don't know what's going on, yet I'm finding it very difficult to put down.

I've read the Book of the New Sun a few times and still don't get most of it. Wolfe is probably the most brilliant SF writer of all time, but he's also one of the most difficult. I love his prose, but his approach to storytelling is intensely frustrating to me.

If you're looking for something with a similar atmosphere (and good writing) but less baffling, I'd recommend David Zindell's first book, Neverness. I didn't care much for the sequels.

MTF

Ebelie
10-04-2005, 03:24 AM
I've read the Book of the New Sun a few times and still don't get most of it. Wolfe is probably the most brilliant SF writer of all time, but he's also one of the most difficult. I love his prose, but his approach to storytelling is intensely frustrating to me.

If you're looking for something with a similar atmosphere (and good writing) but less baffling, I'd recommend David Zindell's first book, Neverness. I didn't care much for the sequels.

MTF

I'm glad it's not just me :). Now that I've gotten used to the other characters coming and going with almost no explanation, I don't find it as frustrating as I did to start with. However I'm still not certain that I understand the plot.

I'll definitely have a look for Neverness when I'm on my next bookshopping expedition.

brokenfingers
10-04-2005, 03:37 AM
LOL! Add me to the group.

I first read Gene Wolfe's Urth books years ago and recently re-read the first book (Shadow of the Torturer) in an attempt to see if I might have a better understanding and/or appreciation of this "classic" with my new "writer's eyes".

I, once again, somewhat enjoyed it but, once again I felt like I was missing something.

He has a different type of writing style and some people love him and some can't get a grip on him.

I guess I fall somewhere in between....

tiny
10-04-2005, 04:44 AM
Gene Wolfe drives me nuts. I so want to read him, and I do, but I struggle. I have a collection of his short stories that I bought because of the cover, Endangered Species. Great stuff. Easier to wade through the shorter pieces. I picked up Knight, but I'm not sure about it.

-chris

Marcusthefish
10-04-2005, 09:26 PM
I finally gave up on Wolfe at about 75 pages into Return to the Whorl (book 3 of the Book of the Short Sun). I have two small children and a day job, so my reading time is limited these days, and I want to enjoy it. But I've read more than a dozen of his novels and two short story collections, so my dues are paid.

If you really want to be baffled, try Soldier in the Mist. You might want to brush up on your Thucydides, Herodotus, and Xenophon first, though.

MTF

Shwebb
10-05-2005, 04:44 AM
I'm currently 1/4 of the way through Winters Heart (Wheel of Time book 8) by Robert Jordan. Darn! Why did I have to get hooked on this series?

I was at the bookstore yesterday, and they said Jordan's next book in the series, Knife of Dreams, is coming out later this month.

I'm hooked on Jordan's WOT series, too, thanks to my husband, but this next one better have a plot. I felt so shystered on the last book!

Love the character development, the exceptionally rich backstory, everything. BUT I don't like how the series has stalled w/ the last few books.

I found Orson Scott Card's new book, Magic Street. (Tried finding Possession, Patti, but they didn't seem to have it at the store where I was.) So far, I'm getting drawn in pretty well. I like pretty much everything he's written, though.

Ebelie
10-06-2005, 05:48 AM
Don't get me started on Robert Jordan!

Many, many years ago :( my dad bought the first book in a trilogy because it looked interesting and because all three books were already published and in the bookstore. He'd had a bad time with authors who didn't finish their series (Amtrak Wars etc) so he thought he'd be safe with the Wheel of Time. We laugh about it now.

And speaking of authors who don't finish their series, Isobelle Carmody's been going even longer than Robert Jordan. I was actually in the recommended age group when I first read Obernewton, and I'm still waiting on the fifth book.

badducky
10-08-2005, 01:01 AM
last night I read Steve Martin's "Shopgirl", but currently 1/3 through Ulysses.

fantasy comes in many guises.

trebuchet
10-08-2005, 02:32 AM
Wow guys, I feel illiterate! I've never read any Gene Wolfe, but I intend to get one of his books asap based on all your posts.

I recently finished Orson Scott Card's Worthing Saga and I've never been more blown away.

Speaking of series that never get anywhere, anybody know if Melanie Rawn's Exiles series went beyond The Mageborn Traitor?

mdin
10-08-2005, 03:42 AM
I'm right in the middle of American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I've had it sitting in my pile for a couple years now, and I've put it off because some of my trusted book friends didn't like it much. So far I've disagreed with them, and I'm really enjoying it.

mdin
10-08-2005, 03:45 AM
I haven't read Odd Thomas yet, but Koontz is definitely one of those authors whose earlier work I much prefer over the more recent. That whole gaggle of books he released that had been previously published under different names didn't help much either.

HConn
10-08-2005, 04:14 AM
I'm reading The Tooth Fairy, by Graham Joyce.

Shwebb
10-08-2005, 04:27 AM
I'm right in the middle of American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I've had it sitting in my pile for a couple years now, and I've put it off because some of my trusted book friends didn't like it much. So far I've disagreed with them, and I'm really enjoying it.

I'm going to start on it tomorrow, actually. My husband really liked it--he got it passed to him by a coworker. I just finished two books--the OSC book Magic Street (liked it) and Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs. (Disturbing, but well-written.) In the same span of time, my husband is halfway through Richard K. Morgan's Woken Fury, his third Takashi Kovac novel. Pretty good scifi, we think. My husband reads a lot slower than I do, but I think his retention is better. I don't know if that's a good thing, though, because I can pick up the same book a couple of years later and enjoy it again, if I liked it well enough the first time.

Ebelie
10-10-2005, 08:02 AM
I just thought I'd mention that I finally finished The Book of the New Sun and now I feel the need to buy more Urth books because of the not completely resolved ending. Sigh.

palmyrah
07-22-2007, 09:59 PM
I just thought I'd mention that I finally finished The Book of the New Sun and now I feel the need to buy more Urth books because of the not completely resolved ending. Sigh.

Here you go. Don't worry everyone else, this is in no way a spoiler.

The Book of the New Sun is the story of how humanity gets a second (or third if you're a Christian) chance from God, or something very like It.

It could also fairly accurately be titled The Education of a Messiah.

It's a book full of traps and tricks and references. You have to catch some of these references to understand what's going on. Trouble is, Wolfe's learning is encyclopaedic and the references often incredibly obsucre -- like the way he conflates the story of Theseus and the Minotaur with the first battle between two ironclad warships, the Merrimac and the Monitor, during the US Civil War -- Minotaur, Monitor -- and the way something like a bush glimpsed near the entrance to the Botanical Gardens in Volume I suddenly assumes enormous explanatory importance in Volume IV -- without having been once mentioned in between. Wolfe refuses to condescend to readers -- he says it's insulting to a reader to tell him or her the same thing twice.

TBOTNS also saw Wolfe make his bid at the commanding heights of twentieth-century literature, the regions inhabited by Proust and Joyce. I won't say he succeeded; I'm not sure I'm qualified to judge. But the demands he places on his readers are certainly in that league. However, he does scatter lots of clues about, such as Severian's conversation with Dorcas about the three meanings of a story, and even a challenge to postmodernist would-be interpreters at one point.

At the end of Volume IV Severian insists that all he has said is true and consistent, and tells the disbelieving reader to go back and read again to assure himself that it is so. This is actually advice from the author -- TBOTNS is not a book you can 'get' at one reading. I've read it four times, and it still has plenty of secrets to reveal.

Here are a few questions that will test how carefully you were following:

1. The first chapter of Volume I, The Shadow of the Torturer, is entitled Resurrection and Death. How many resurrections are there in TBOTNS? (Hint: there are many, and not all are equally obvious.)

2. Did you feel, just over halfway through Volume IV, The Citadel of the Autarch, that the climax had come and gone and the story was just pointlessly plodding on?

3. Who is Severian's brother? (Or was it son?)

If you've read all four volumes of TBOTNS, there's only one other Urth volume to read and it's not really part of the cycle. Urth of the New Sun was written on the insistence of Wolfe's publisher, who felt TBOTNS left too many questions unanswered. The book answers a few of those questions (sort of) but raises a whole lot more. I suggest you read the cycle again instead -- but give yourself a few months' rest first.

The Book of the New Sun looks like a sword-and-sorcery fantasy at first glance. A slightly more careful reading reveals that the sorcery is really technology, and TBOTNS is actually science fiction. By then you'll also have discovered that it's a literary masterpiece in the high tradition, which will hopefully draw you back to it again. You will then find, if you haven't found it out before, that you are reading a profoundly meditative religious novel.

Shweta
07-23-2007, 01:32 AM
I'm currently reading The Coyote Road -- the new Datlow/Windling anthology. Trickster tales! What could be more fun?


Earth Abides by George R. Stewart - Post-apocalyptic novel.

I'd love to know what you make of it. I enjoyed the beginning a great deal but the book overall felt much longer to me than it was, because I couldn't see the point of most of the middle third.

If you do, please let me know :)


I'm racing through Cory Doctorow.

Cory's week teaching at Clarion is just over, and it's been great fun.
He had a birthday (http://www.tumbolia.org/%7Eshweta/Techno%20Mickey.jpg) here, too. (Do go look at the link, it's chalk art and I'm proud of it).

And do try his short stories! I adore the stories in Overclocked. Also, his new book, Little Brother, is going to be loads of fun. And loads of controversy too, I think. So there's something to look forward to.:hooray:


I'm right in the middle of American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I've had it sitting in my pile for a couple years now, and I've put it off because some of my trusted book friends didn't like it much. So far I've disagreed with them, and I'm really enjoying it.

I thought American Gods had some problems -- but I figure when Neil Gaiman has problems he sinks to merely good, y'know?

Death Wizard
07-23-2007, 01:42 AM
Here are the last five books I've read or re-read: Midnight Tides, Steven Erikson (four stars); Word Wars, Chris Stevenson (five stars); Starship Troopers, Robert A. Heinlein (three stars); The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway (five stars); The Children of Hurin, Christopher Tolkien (two stars).

Here are the next five books I own and am planning on reading: The Bonehunters, Steven Erikson; Flight of the Nighthawks (Book One), Raymond E. Feist; Song for the Basilisk, Patricia A. McKillip; Dragon Bones, Patricia Briggs; Sword in the Storm (Book One), David Gemmell.

(I only have this so well-organized because I recently put it on my blog.)

Justin91
07-23-2007, 08:25 AM
I just read Cormac McCarthy's The Road and Blood Meridian. Both were full of colorful language and disturbing images in a sureal landscape. I am not really sure how to rate them yet...I will need to think about it for a while.

Sharon Mock
07-23-2007, 11:28 AM
I finally got around to reading Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner, having read the sequel a few years ago. It's a light and elegant story about very, very dark subjects. Fun to read and fun to poke around in my head after. Highly recommended. Just two problems. One, my husband hasn't read it yet, and probably won't get to it for the next couple of weeks. Two, I'm a little afraid of getting her voice stuck in my head.

Not sure what's next; I have the to-be-read pile from hell. Teh Internet has given me bad habits. Probably one of the multitude of books on loan.

Inkdaub
07-23-2007, 12:50 PM
I just read Scott Lynch's Lies of Locke Lamora and would rate it at four stars on a five star scale...maybe four and a half.

I read Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and would rate it a half star below Lamora...both of which are debut novels even if Lamora doesn't read like one.

I got a Jim Butcher omni from the book club that has the first three Dresden Files. I can't get into it for whatever reason.

I just read Planet Hulk, a trade hardback featuring the last year of Hulk comics. Pretty cool stuff. I liked it even though I'm not really a Hulk fan.

This afternoon I read the first comic in a six issue series adapted from Dumas' The Man in the Iron Mask...it was awful.

DarthIggy
07-23-2007, 05:27 PM
"The Kalahari Typing School for Men" by Alexander McCall Smith which is the sequal to "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency".

Its not sci-fi or fantasy, but very interesting. And a nice snapshot of life and culture in Batswana.

Just Mike
07-23-2007, 05:36 PM
Just re-read Ted Sturgeon's More than Human, which I recommend highly. Sturgeon might be the best stylist in SF history, IMHO. Others might vote for Bradbury, Zelazny, etc. Be forewarned; Sturgeon took Love as his theme, and with some it may not gel.

Finished the Murder of Roger Ackroyd some time before that. Not SF but a master course in the unreliable narrator nonetheless.

I'm half-way through Time Enough for Love, which makes this the ninth or tenth read through. Heinlein is comfort food to me, what can I say?

Silverhand
07-23-2007, 09:11 PM
Being a no-name author myself...I have really been trying to read other first-timers.

As such, I have been reading A Calm Before The Storm by Joe Lawson and Ancient Mirrors by Jayel Gibson.

Death Wizard
07-25-2007, 08:01 AM
I'm currently reading Thoughts Without a Thinker by Mark Epstein--about psychotherapy from a Buddhist perspective.

I enjoyed that one. Try Mindfulness in Plain English by Bhante Henepola Gunaratana.

Death Wizard
07-25-2007, 08:02 AM
I just read Cormac McCarthy's The Road and Blood Meridian. Both were full of colorful language and disturbing images in a sureal landscape. I am not really sure how to rate them yet...I will need to think about it for a while.

The Road was strange, but there's no arguing it was a mind-blower. It sticks with you like bad chicken.

Pthom
07-25-2007, 12:49 PM
Just finished Beggars and Choosers by Nancy Kress. Went to the unread pile and dug out a Clifford Simak: The Visitors.

I much enjoyed Kress. I have enjoyed Simak before, but I must confess I'm struggling with this one.

waylander
07-25-2007, 02:05 PM
Just finished 'Black Man', the new one from Richard Morgan. Action adventure scifi with a very twisty plotline. Well handled and paced - rating 7/10

Evaine
07-25-2007, 08:02 PM
Titan by Stephen Baxter - with NASA slowly winding down, various enthusiasts for space in the organisation concieve a plan to get to Titan using current, and even obsolete, technology - the Shuttle, and even Saturn V rockets. It's written in a very realistic way, with lots of technical info about real space exploration.

DragonHeart
08-05-2007, 04:44 PM
Recently finished reading the His Dark Materials trilogy for the first time - picked up the box set. Very, very good. I often found myself stopping to try putting the hints of foreshadowing together, like a puzzle.

I've just started Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett. Haven't read any of his work before, other than his cowriting venture Good Omens with Neil Gaiman.

~DragonHeart~

Moonfish
08-05-2007, 08:00 PM
I'm actually reading Tamora Pierce's Lioness-quartet. Never read it as a kid ans since I know she's big, I wanted to see for myself.

Mom'sWrite
08-06-2007, 12:47 AM
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Rowling
Writer Faster, Write Better Fryxell
A Prayer for Owen Meany Irving
The Writer's Digest Handbook of Magazine Article Writing Ruberg

I just finished Cormac McCarthy's The Road and it didn't suck.

dragonjax
08-06-2007, 02:16 AM
Currently reading:

THE REINCARNATIONIST, M.J. Rose
WINDFALL, Rachel Caine
UNMASQUED, Colette Gale
ON THE ROPES, Tom Schreck

Zoombie
08-06-2007, 02:39 AM
I've been re-playing Planescape: Torment. Even though it's a video game, its 6 million lines of text, huge, multi-plotted story line, array of bizarre characters and awesome setting make it more of a graphical choose your own adventure book.

On the subject of real books, I've been reading Sandy Mitchael's hilarious Commissar Cain series, starting with For the Emperor, then on to Caves of Ice, The Traitor's Hand and then Duty Calls.

I've also read the latest Harry Potter novel and my Bible: "The Writer's Guide to Creating A Science Fiction Universe."

I'm a busy little boy.

MonaLeigh
08-06-2007, 02:42 AM
I read Janet Evanovich's How I Write, and from there read the first of her Stephanie Plum novels. I'm on book 6 and I'm addicted. I read about one or two a week, mostly in bed.

farfromfearless
08-06-2007, 06:10 AM
I'm about ready to pick up my copy of the Golden Compass.

Broche
08-06-2007, 07:42 AM
Re-reading Mervyn Peake's "Titus" trilogy. Just starting the first book "Titus Groan". Perhaps my favourite books ever.

Wintermule
08-06-2007, 09:44 AM
Reading Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin. Was hoping to pick up A Scanner Darkly by Dick, but they were out.

Sassee
08-06-2007, 03:28 PM
Re-reading Minion by L.A. Banks. I've read it before and enjoyed it, but I've run out of new books to read. Time to recycle the favorites until I can get to a bookstore...

I would also like to read The Golden Compass, if nothing else just to say I read it before the movie comes out.

Dawno
08-06-2007, 08:32 PM
Read Joe Haldeman's The Accidental Time Machine (http://www.amazon.com/Accidental-Time-Machine-Joe-Haldeman/dp/0441014992/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-5920982-6055217?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186417925&sr=8-2) while traveling. Enjoyed the heck outta it.

Hapax Legomenon
08-06-2007, 08:44 PM
I'm reading Perdido Street Station, or at least trying to. And maybe The Golden Compass.

Wintermule
08-07-2007, 01:57 AM
PSS is an excellent book..

HourglassMemory
08-07-2007, 02:52 AM
I read the first book in the "his Dark Materials" , "Northen Lights" then stopped the series to read the alst Harry Potter and now I'm back to the triology.
Currently reading "The Subtle Knife"

Tasmin21
08-07-2007, 03:02 AM
Just finished Anne Bishop's The Pillars of the World, and I plan to read her Sebastian and Belladonna while I'm off this week on vacation.

No, I haven't read her Black Jewels trilogy yet, though I'm told I simply must.

JerseyGirl1962
08-07-2007, 11:12 PM
I read Janet Evanovich's How I Write, and from there read the first of her Stephanie Plum novels. I'm on book 6 and I'm addicted. I read about one or two a week, mostly in bed.

They are quite addictive, aren't they? :D

What I'm reading now is the last book in The Belgariad series; decided I needed to read something on the fun side.

Right after that I'm going to read The Jade Throne, the 2nd in Naomi Novik's series. Although the 1st book started a bit slow for me, it picked up before the 1st chapter was over.

Jeez. So many books to read, so little time!

~Nancy

Dave.C.Robinson
08-07-2007, 11:51 PM
Right now I'm reading Robert K. Massie's Castles of Steel about the Great War at Sea and thoroughly enjoying it. I'm also working more slowly on Louis L'Amour's Night in the Solomons because I love his non-Western short stories.

Oddly enough not reading any SF or Fantasy at present, though that may change soon enough.

LisaHy
08-08-2007, 03:18 AM
Just finished Anne Bishop's The Pillars of the World, and I plan to read her Sebastian and Belladonna while I'm off this week on vacation.

No, I haven't read her Black Jewels trilogy yet, though I'm told I simply must.

I've only read the Black Jewels trilogy, again because I was told 'I simply must'. The first was good, very dark, very passionate. The second, less so and little more trite. The third was so, so, so... (and I hate this word, so that should show you the strength of my feelings) twee. From a dark, troubled, beautiful beginning, it turns into only so much teen angst, made worse by the fact that the characters are in their twenties, and in some cases, in their nine hundreds.

I've been so damaged by my disappointment that I won't pick up another Bishop book for a long time yet.

Currently, I'm reading The Dark Tower, the last great ah hem of King's magnum opus. I'm struggling and my mind keeps wandering to the stack of books I just now I'll enjoy so much more on the shelf. But I am determined to see this through to the finish. Only an absolutely brilliant ending can make the last half of this series worthy of the first half. Fingers crossed for an asbolutely brilliant ending.

The above are all my own opinions, and at this stage in life, I've come to the realisation that my tastes are usually on the extreme outer edge of the norm.

Cheers, Lisa.

TheKnightWhoSaidNi
08-08-2007, 04:45 AM
I'm anxiously awaiting the fifth "A Song of Ice and Fire," and the HBO miniseries based off of it.

As for what I'm READING, however, I picked up "The Golden Compass" and was fascinated but couldn't find time to finish it before having to return it to the library. Shall pick it up again soon, though.

Also, I breezed through the last HP book pleased and excited, though it's not my favorite in the series (that would be a tie between 4 and 5). I am going to pick up "The Eyes of God" by John Marco at the library, since I've heard some good things. I might even start "Wheel of Time" out of curiosity. Tried to get into "Eragon" to no avail, finding the author completely devoid of style or flow.

Simon Woodhouse
08-08-2007, 04:55 AM
I'm half way through Consider Phlebas by Iain M Banks. Someone in another forum said they thought it was his best sci-fi novel, and I'm inclined to agree.

celeber
08-08-2007, 09:12 PM
I just finished up Starstrike: Task Force Mars by Kevin Dockery and Douglas Niles. This was a lot of fun and I can not wait for the next installment. Space, aliens, witty SEALS and lots of action = fun fun fun

I also devoured Janot Evanovich's THREE TO GET DEADLY. I am still interested in this series, but I hope that Stephanie becomes more knowledgable and quits stumbling around so much.

MonaLeigh
08-08-2007, 09:19 PM
They are quite addictive, aren't they? :D

Yes! I'm already on book 7 now. I'm also reading Pen on Fire (which I'm almost done with) and I just started Making a Good Writer Great. I just discovered Stevi Mittman who is like Janet Evanovich, so I'm going to try her fiction next.

aadams73
08-08-2007, 10:43 PM
I am still interested in this series, but I hope that Stephanie becomes more knowledgable and quits stumbling around so much.

Sadly she doesn't.

Currently I'm reading Terry Pratchett's Going Postal. The guy is really a true master of the English language.

Shweta
08-08-2007, 10:51 PM
I'm half way through Consider Phlebas by Iain M Banks. Someone in another forum said they thought it was his best sci-fi novel, and I'm inclined to agree.

If by "best" they mean "biggest punch in the gut", I'd agree.
But I think The Player of Games does some things much more interestingly and with much more subtlety, and I've heard the same of Use of Weapons.

However, if this is someone who likes his non-SF, and is judging his SF on the same terms, I totally see where they're coming from.

Jacob
08-08-2007, 10:55 PM
I went back a few pages but couldn't find a similar thread so....

I'm in the middle of Dan Simmons' Ilium and am really enjoying it. It's my first foray back into SF in quite some time but I enjoyed his Hyperion and Endymion books so picked this one up. It's almost impossible to summarize - a wild, rollercoaster of a novel involving mechs, humans, post-humans and Greek gods. Highly recommended.

Recently read and enjoyed J.V. Jones' A Fortress of Grey Ice, the second in her Sword of Shadows series. It felt a bit rushed at the end. I could sense her publisher tapping his watch and glaring but I still intend to read the next one. Just hope she doesn't decide to Jordanize the series.

What's got you flipping pages?

I just finished "Shadowplay" by "Tad Williams", the second in the "ShadowMarch" trilogy. Now Im reading . "The Sex Lives of Cannibals" by" J. Maarten Troost." For those of you who enjoy travel writing this is one of the funniest Ive read!

aadams73
08-08-2007, 10:59 PM
"The Sex Lives of Cannibals" by" J. Maarten Troost." For those of you who enjoy travel writing this is one of the funniest Ive read!

I heartily second this. I read it recently and laughed so hard I cried.

Jacob
08-09-2007, 01:39 AM
I heartily second this. I read it recently and laughed so hard I cried.
Have you read his other one "Getting stoned with savages" ? Man, this guy picks the best titles.