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FranYoakumVeal
11-19-2010, 08:23 AM
I'm new to AW and a newbie writer. I believe God is calling me to write for the secular YA market. My daughter is 12 and I've been appalled at some of the stuff that she and my teen nieces have come home with. Surely one can be edgy without being a vampire, werewolf, or sex kitten. I've finished the first draft of my WIP and I am looking for advice, encouragement and prayer.

Blessings!

Gecko Girl
11-19-2010, 09:09 AM
Welcome to AW! When God calls, it always pays to listen. Congrats on the first draft. That's a wonderful accomplishment. I don't have any advice, but I wish you the best and will certainly say a prayer. I don't write YA (I'm more into romance) but my writing buddy does and she has the same concerns you do. My daughter is 9 and loves to read. I'll have to look for your book- hopefully it will be available when she reaches the target age. Good luck!

P.S. I "followed" your blog.

FranYoakumVeal
11-19-2010, 05:45 PM
Thanks! I "followed" your blog, too.

I'm in the process of deciding how to publish. It's very difficult to break into the commercial market!

Calla Lily
11-19-2010, 06:26 PM
Welcome, Fran.

There are a few basic steps to getting published--you've done the first one: written a book. Congrats! So many people never get to that point.

Now comes the editing. And more editing. And finding good beta readers. "Good" betas are fellow writers--not your family or friends, for the most part, because you want disinterested betas who'll tell you what works and what doesn't.

When you've got beta comments back and have re-edited, tehen you get to experience the joy of writing query letters. I recommend chocoalte and booze--stock up now, because you'll want it handy when you start querying agents. Agents are the ones who can get your book looked at by commercial publishers. The kind of publishers who pay you an advance, market your book, and get it on the shelves in bookstores.

Have fun and good luck! We're here to encourage and commiserate and celebrate with you. :)

Pat~
11-19-2010, 08:46 PM
Congrats on completion of the rough draft, Fran! I'm wondering, have you been able to try it out on your daughter, or better yet, any of her friends for a test response? (Family might not be the best test subject!)

I echo what Callalily says...even though it feels done, you're just at the beginning. (But a great beginning.) It'd be extremely beneficial to share a few selections or chapters with a local writers' critique group (or even on our password-protected youth writing forum on AW) for some constructive feedback concerning pacing, plot structure, dialogue, etc. Then after honing and rewriting/editing as much as you can, get hold of Writers' Market 2011 or a current agent market book at your local bookstore to find the best-matched agents/publishers for your work. Nowadays commercial book publishing is most easily accomplished through an agent; and we have some threads on AW also dedicated to which agents/publishers might be good to avoid, too. Don't miss those.

FranYoakumVeal
11-19-2010, 10:28 PM
Welcome, Fran.


Now comes the editing. And more editing. And finding good beta readers. "Good" betas are fellow writers--not your family or friends, for the most part, because you want disinterested betas who'll tell you what works and what doesn't.
:)

Yes, I am at the love/hate stage of my relationship with this book. E-d-i-t-i-n-g!

FranYoakumVeal
11-19-2010, 10:33 PM
Congrats on completion of the rough draft, Fran! I'm wondering, have you been able to try it out on your daughter, or better yet, any of her friends for a test response? (Family might not be the best test subject!)



My daughter is probably a little prejudiced, but my nieces have absolutely no qualms about telling me what they really think. My older niece (14) is an avid reader and has strong opinions about what she does an does not like in a book.

Belive it or not, my mom, a former English teacher, has helped with the grammar. She actually likes the story and she is not one to offer praise. (I love her, but this is one of the few times she's actually offered a positive comment about something I've done. She's usually very non-commital.)

I am looking for Beta readers, but I don't think the MS is quite ready for them yet! I still have a few annoying lose ends to tie up. Not real happy with the ending.

Pat~
11-20-2010, 04:54 AM
Looks like you have access to plenty of good input, then!

Robin Bayne
11-20-2010, 10:52 PM
Revising and editing is a not the most fun part of the process!

What helps me is to leave the work alone for as long as possible, and that makes it easier to see things to fix. It helps to go in with "fresh eyes."

RandomJerk
11-20-2010, 11:52 PM
As an atheist, I will tread lightly here. My question is in regards to writing "for the secular YA market". The "secular" folk are reading things because they like them. Don't get overly preachy. I'm guessing Narnia or something like that would be a good thing to shoot for. Not that I ever finished the series.

FranYoakumVeal
11-21-2010, 12:16 AM
As an atheist, I will tread lightly here. My question is in regards to writing "for the secular YA market". The "secular" folk are reading things because they like them. Don't get overly preachy. I'm guessing Narnia or something like that would be a good thing to shoot for. Not that I ever finished the series.

Thank you for your input and your honesty. My book has no preaching. While I enjoy Christian novels (mostly suspense like Ted Dekker or Brandylin Collins), I don't particularly enjoy being preached at either! I probably read as many secular as Christian books.

A Christian is who I am, part of me, so I guess that might come across in my writing. For instance, the subject matter is edgy (girl dealing with violent murder of her parents), but I don't use swearing. Narnia, with all of its Christian symbolism, is much more overtly Christian than my book.

RandomJerk
11-21-2010, 12:32 AM
Good to hear. I wish you luck!

FranYoakumVeal
11-21-2010, 03:05 AM
Thank you!

Gravity
11-21-2010, 07:53 AM
Fran, write where the Lord leads you. If it's the secular arena, you'll find yourself in good company: John Grisham, Dorothy Sayers, Dean Koontz, Walker Percy, Flannery O'Connor, Graham Greene, and many other Christian writers found their niche writing for primarily non-Christian markets ... including yours truly. Blessings on your journey.

MickCarranza
01-01-2011, 08:46 PM
I'm a Christian and I thought a direct allegory of Christ's death and resurrection was the preachiest thing I'd ever seen. (I love Lewis and Narnia rocks!)

jasperd
01-05-2011, 08:00 AM
Before I even thought about viewing this section, I just happened to check out the New York Times best sellers for Childrens Chapter books. Four of the five top books are about witchcraft or mythology. It is alarming. I agree, I believe that more Christians do need to write for the secular market.

Rose de Guzman
01-05-2011, 04:03 PM
I'm also Christian and writing for the secular market. I have one WIP that is YA and one that is kind of in between YA and adult (people are calling this "new adult now") with a nineteen-year-old heroine. The YA book does not deal with religion at all, and the other deals with it as a side issue. The male lead is a practicing Christian (Russian Orthodox) while the heroine is not, and there is a conversion that takes place but it is far from the main plot line of the novel.

Religion enters into mainstream books all the time. Fae Kellerman writes mysteries with orthodox Jewish characters. The Brother Cadfile (sp) books were sold mainstream. As long as the book does not force the idea that the character's beliefs should be the readers' beliefs, then it is fine.

As a Christian, I understand the desire to write "cleaner" fiction, and I praise you for that. Even as an adult, I do not like racy content in my fiction. I can't relate to promiscuous or drug using characters. And I really couldn't as a teen.

Receding Waters
01-22-2011, 06:32 PM
I recently had a conversation with a family member like this about my writing. I'm a Christian writing with faith/religious components in the plot, but I'm still hesitant to call it Christian Fiction because of the fantasy element. In one novel the faith component is more evident, but in the second one it's there as a way of reference or character development more than a plot-mover. A MC in one of the novels is a demon, and there are psychic characters within the story, too--elements of fantasy more so religion (unless you go Old Testament and call 'em Prophets), but it seems no matter what I write there is a subtle (sometimes not-so-subtle) hint toward faith or forgiveness. If I can ever succeed in making either one query-ready, do you think it'd matter if I attempted to market them as either Secular or Christian?

Dancre
01-23-2011, 02:54 AM
Hi Fran, welcome to the great world of writing. I too write YA for teens and for the same reason. Gesh!! Too much sex and icky stuff!! I've learned that edgy doesn't have to be sex, cursing or new age stuff, but edgy is just basically Showing a character get out of trouble. Edgy is more of getting into a character's mind, or feelings about the situation. It means digging deep into God and into ourselves.

As for advice, well imo, learn, learn, learn the craft of writing. Each lesson I learned is like another tool in my toolbox. My dad always yells at me b/c I don't use the right tool for the right job. I use a knife for a screwdriver and a shoe for a hammer. Gesh!!! Boy do I ever hear it!! So the more tech you learn, the more you can use, the more you can tweek, the more you can break, the easier it is to write, the better a read. I'll jump over to your blog and be a follower. Hang in there, God has a plan.


I'm new to AW and a newbie writer. I believe God is calling me to write for the secular YA market. My daughter is 12 and I've been appalled at some of the stuff that she and my teen nieces have come home with. Surely one can be edgy without being a vampire, werewolf, or sex kitten. I've finished the first draft of my WIP and I am looking for advice, encouragement and prayer.

Blessings!

Dancre
01-23-2011, 02:58 AM
I have the same situation. My story is also fantasy - christian fantasy is really growing! - and it also has faith elements in it. It's like LOTR, where you 'see' the faith stuff, but it's underneath the story. I'm trying to sell it as a christian novel, but if that doesn't work then I'll sell it to the secular one. It's interesting, b/c the unsaved folks who have read the first book in the series loved it, but didn't 'see' the christian elements. The saved folks did. I think it could go both ways, which is good. It has a larger market. Publishers love larger market books called crossovers.


I recently had a conversation with a family member like this about my writing. I'm a Christian writing with faith/religious components in the plot, but I'm still hesitant to call it Christian Fiction because of the fantasy element. In one novel the faith component is more evident, but in the second one it's there as a way of reference or character development more than a plot-mover. A MC in one of the novels is a demon, and there are psychic characters within the story, too--elements of fantasy more so religion (unless you go Old Testament and call 'em Prophets), but it seems no matter what I write there is a subtle (sometimes not-so-subtle) hint toward faith or forgiveness. If I can ever succeed in making either one query-ready, do you think it'd matter if I attempted to market them as either Secular or Christian?

WalkingContradiction
01-23-2011, 06:09 AM
It's interesting, b/c the unsaved folks who have read the first book in the series loved it, but didn't 'see' the christian elements. The saved folks did.

I'd watch out with these terms, especially if you want to write for the secular market. They seem pretty condescending to me.

@Topic, in my view, the Narnia books were a bit too preachy. Especially towards the end, the message becomes 'anti-life', devaluing life on earth and completely focusing on an afterlife. Also, the girls' (forgot her name) sexuality is demonized (when she wears stockings).

LOTR on the other hand was great because I never really noticed any Christian component; you only see it if you really look for it.

Dancre
01-23-2011, 08:41 AM
How is that condensending? I'm just making an observation that pretty much amazed me. I was expecting the unsaved folks to say, Is this one of those religious books? But they didn't, which surprised me, but also was a bit of relief in that I'm not excluding the secular group.


I'd watch out with these terms, especially if you want to write for the secular market. They seem pretty condescending to me.

@Topic, in my view, the Narnia books were a bit too preachy. Especially towards the end, the message becomes 'anti-life', devaluing life on earth and completely focusing on an afterlife. Also, the girls' (forgot her name) sexuality is demonized (when she wears stockings).

LOTR on the other hand was great because I never really noticed any Christian component; you only see it if you really look for it.

inckyinc
01-23-2011, 02:18 PM
Dancre, I think WalkingContradiction is referring to the terms "saved" and "unsaved." It would be less offensive if you said "Christian" and "non-Christian." If you don't believe that you need to be saved, then it seems condescending to be called "unsaved."

inckyinc
01-23-2011, 02:22 PM
And I don't see how the end of the Narnia series was "anti-life", it was about continuing life in a new and better place. Lewis's philosophy was that our current life and earth are shadows of Ultimate Reality. Not that they don't matter, but that they are only the reflections of what we're really made for.

WalkingContradiction
01-24-2011, 12:55 AM
Yeah I did mean the terms saved/unsaved. I know it wasn't meant in a bad way.


And I don't see how the end of the Narnia series was "anti-life", it was about continuing life in a new and better place. Lewis's philosophy was that our current life and earth are shadows of Ultimate Reality. Not that they don't matter, but that they are only the reflections of what we're really made for.

Well that's kind of the point. 'A new and better place', which devalues the life here, right now. And if it's the only life we have then that's a problem. Of course I'm talking from a secular perspective here, but I can imagine even some Christians finding it somewhat problematic.

Dancre
01-26-2011, 07:19 AM
Ok, thanks. Sorry.


Yeah I did mean the terms saved/unsaved. I know it wasn't meant in a bad way.



Well that's kind of the point. 'A new and better place', which devalues the life here, right now. And if it's the only life we have then that's a problem. Of course I'm talking from a secular perspective here, but I can imagine even some Christians finding it somewhat problematic.

ishtar'sgate
01-26-2011, 08:42 PM
Well that's kind of the point. 'A new and better place', which devalues the life here, right now. And if it's the only life we have then that's a problem. Of course I'm talking from a secular perspective here, but I can imagine even some Christians finding it somewhat problematic.


Sorry, but from a Christan perspective this life and this world DOES have little value. Where we are going IS a new and better place. That's what it means to be a Christian -we hope in something far better. A verse to clarify.
"And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away."

Last week one of our horses was fatally injured and died. It was horrific. Death is ugly, very ugly. The Christian has a hope of no death ever again, no sadness ever again, no pain ever again. As far as I'm concerned that's what devalues this life - we HAVE death, we HAVE sorrow, we HAVE pain and it permeates everything. Of course I love my family and there are good things about this life but my hope isn't in this world, my hope is in the next, where everything lives and never dies, no one is sick or in pain. Essentially, there will be perfect peace.

That is the Christiian's hope and it is bound to come through in their writing because it is a part of who they are.

WalkingContradiction
01-27-2011, 01:46 AM
I understand that, I just pointed it out because the discussion was about the secular market.

I assume your reply is mainly based on my comment that even some Christians would object to this view. You're certainly right about that, these would be 'luke-warm' Christians. As an atheist, I've got mixed feelings about that. In a way I think they're a bit hypocritical, at least the fundamentalists really believe what they believe. On the other hand, there are big problems with fundamentalism too. But let's leave that aside, this is about books with a 'mild' Christian theme, and I suggested it better be a bit milder than the ending of Narnia to do well in the secular market.

As a side note, Dostoevsky's book are full of Christian themes, yet Dostoevsky is equally skilled at arguing the 'nihilist' point of view, so his books get so deep and intriguing that I don't mind the Christian themes at all; in fact I think Dostoevsky probably is the best novelist of all times.

ishtar'sgate
01-27-2011, 10:38 PM
I understand that, I just pointed it out because the discussion was about the secular market.



I reread Dancre's post and I don't think she meant she used the terms 'saved' and 'unsaved' in her writing, she's only using those terms to us in here because we are, for the most part, fellow believers. I write for the secular market too and while one must use care in what you write, in my last novel I was able to communicate the hope Christians have in Jesus Christ without being preachy. It was simply who the character was and he died for his faith. My current WIP is also for the secular market and will again reflect some aspect of my faith. I think it can be done and be done tastefully and without condescension.

First and foremost you must have an engaging story to tell. If all you are using a story for is as a vehicle for an agenda, be it Christian, atheist, Muslim, whatever, I doubt it will fly in the secular market.

Selah March
01-27-2011, 10:52 PM
I assume your reply is mainly based on my comment that even some Christians would object to this view. You're certainly right about that, these would be 'luke-warm' Christians.

As a Christian who's been "saved" since the age of eight and is quite passionate about her faith, I take exception to that.

I love life. Yes, this one, right here on earth. I'm not a Christian because I hate the world and want to get to a place that's different. I'm a Christian because I love Christ and want to be as much like Him as I can possibly be -- not because it's a ticket into heaven, but because it's the right thing to do. My reading of scripture tells me I should rejoice in pain as well as pleasure, and thank God for every moment of every day of this life. This one, today, here and now. Yes, I hope for a better life in the hereafter, but I don't let that hope cloud my enjoyment of the gift of life God has already given me.

Carradee
01-31-2011, 08:13 PM
*raises hand* A fellow Christian writing for the secular market, particularly the "edgy paranormal YA" bit.

I'm weary of all the laughable stereotypes that frequent modern literature that includes "Christian" characters. My characters are Christian—but not every character—and not everyone ends up saved, either.

Undivided_Heart
04-09-2011, 08:48 PM
Hi there,
This sounds great! I'm toying with the idea of writing a 'light fantasy' novel... there are so many dark fantasy YA novels around (some of which I love), but I there is a definite focus on darkness, and we want to be encouraging following the light! So well done for this!
I'm currently finishing up a romance novel for teens, where the MC will become a Christian at the end. I'm wondering if I should pitch it to Christian publishers, where I have some links, or if I should try secular publishers/agents... this would reach a much wider audience, and could then have a more evangelistic focus. What do all of you think about this?
Keep up the good work! :)

JCedonia
05-16-2011, 01:06 AM
I'm currently finishing up a romance novel for teens, where the MC will become a Christian at the end. I'm wondering if I should pitch it to Christian publishers, where I have some links, or if I should try secular publishers/agents... this would reach a much wider audience, and could then have a more evangelistic focus. What do all of you think about this?

Even as a lover of romance (teen included), I have to ask: should a Christian be supporting teen romance as a genre in the CF market? I mean, romance usually ends in marriage, unless it's a marriage of convenience at the beginning. So will teens be marrying their high school sweethearts? Or going to the same college at the end?


As for as Christians writing secular goes:

I'm a Christian, but honestly, the CF section is usually the last place I go to in Barnes & Noble. Sure, I got some Christian brand names, but I don't care for it as a whole. It's too censored, I can't relate to the characters, and the titles/covers don't appeal to me.

(Stephen R, Lawhead is my favorite author, although personally I don't think some of his books even belong in a Christian bookstore.)

Yeah, there needs to be some more Christians writing in the secular market.

I write fantasy. My characters believe in a higher power. There's angels, demons, fairies, dragons, what-have-you, and my characters have Judeo-Christian values. I end it there. Maybe later I'd write for the Christian market, but not right now.

My only problem is that my MC's name is Hindi. It's not one of their gods, and I didn't know that when I started using the name. However, God-willing, this book does get published, realistically, whose going to go through the trouble of looking up the name and what it means?

Selah March
05-19-2011, 01:55 AM
Even as a lover of romance (teen included), I have to ask: should a Christian be supporting teen romance as a genre in the CF market? I mean, romance usually ends in marriage, unless it's a marriage of convenience at the beginning. So will teens be marrying their high school sweethearts? Or going to the same college at the end?


Books categorized as romance do not have to end in marriage. Some do, but you'll find many that don't. It's not a requirement of the genre.

Therefore YA romances, as a subgenre of romance, do not have to end in marriage, either.

Deb Kinnard
05-19-2011, 04:33 AM
I'd refer you to the excellently written Christy Miller series of teen romances by Robin Gunn, in which the endings are quite satisfactory but don't end in marriage (till the last one, I think). You're right -- teens do need stuff to read that isn't thinly disguised smut or dark angsty vampire stuff.

My 16 year old girl loves Terry Pratchett books. If I were smarter, I'd write stuff like that, aimed at the teen market. Alas...

Gravity
05-19-2011, 08:05 AM
For what it's worth, I have four commercially published CBA novels out, and I'm now switching gears and heading into the general market with my fifth and sixth. Dunno if that's what the OP was asking for.

JCedonia
05-20-2011, 02:29 AM
Books categorized as romance do not have to end in marriage. Some do, but you'll find many that don't. It's not a requirement of the genre.

Therefore YA romances, as a subgenre of romance, do not have to end in marriage, either.

Oops. But usually it's a done deal that they're together forever happily ever after at the end of the book, right?

Carradee
05-20-2011, 03:31 PM
Oops. But usually it's a done deal that they're together forever happily ever after at the end of the book, right?

Not necessarily. Some romance markets require HEA (Happily Ever After). Some are fine with HFN (Happy For Now)—at least I think that's how the latter one's acronymed.

I've somehow been browsing some romance e-publisher sites, lately, which is how I learned those terms.

In what I've read, it seems that straight category adult romance is more interested in HEA, while other romance genres are fine with HFN. Not that I read much romance. I sometimes read "romance" novels for reasons besides the romance, like the the author's agent has a way of repping things I like or I'm interested in the fantasy elements or something.

Selah March
05-23-2011, 09:28 PM
Oops. But usually it's a done deal that they're together forever happily ever after at the end of the book, right?

Caradee's correct -- Happy For Now (aka HFN) is perfectly acceptable in most contemporary romance novels. In historicals, it's harder to pull off, as people didn't live together without benefit of marriage very often.

As to the divide on the issue between epubbed and print, I'd say there's not much difference anymore, though you're more likely to find endings that include wedding bells and/or children in the more traditional Harlequin category lines. In non-category romance, whether epubbed or from one of the NY print-first houses, all bets are off.

tricon7
10-18-2012, 12:00 AM
I want to write an adventure novel for the secular market, but I sometimes feel that it won't even be considered unless it has profanity, sex, and/or gratuitous violence in it. It's to be expected now, it seems. But how many people, whether Christian or just moral people, would love to read a non-religious fiction book without having to wade through garbage and rot?

I have several books in my library that are fantastic reads - except for the problems I mentioned or worse, their incessant Christian-bashing.

I do hope there's a market for wholesome, non-religious fiction out there.

Lavern08
10-18-2012, 10:49 PM
... But how many people, whether Christian or just moral people, would love to read a non-religious fiction book without having to wade through garbage and rot?

:hi:- I would

Gravity
10-18-2012, 11:31 PM
But how many people, whether Christian or just moral people, would love to read a non-religious fiction book without having to wade through garbage and rot?

Two words: Dean Koontz. A stellar Christian writer, at the top of his game.

RandomJerk
10-19-2012, 06:18 PM
Not sure I'm liking this. I hope this reading stuff won't interfere with my baby-eating and puppy-drowning.

clevername37
12-31-2012, 02:16 AM
I have a completed novel about a pastor rescuing his kidnapped wife with the aid of a mobster's son and I am currently working on a historical fiction of a prophet of the Old Testament. My intent is to pitch them both to secular markets since it is more important for me that non-Christians read them. Also, it would be hard to write a story from the old testament without including war scenes and warriors don't say owie when their hands get axed in battle. I'm not vulgar, yet even Paul said he wished that those preaching circumcision would go the whole way with it.

Calla Lily
12-31-2012, 02:47 AM
<snip>
Also, it would be hard to write a story from the old testament without including war scenes and warriors don't say owie when their hands get axed in battle.

:roll:

Welcome!

quicklime
01-18-2013, 08:40 PM
I want to write an adventure novel for the secular market, but I sometimes feel that it won't even be considered unless it has profanity, sex, and/or gratuitous violence in it. It's to be expected now, it seems. But how many people, whether Christian or just moral people, would love to read a non-religious fiction book without having to wade through garbage and rot? i'm not big on the notion anything reflective of life, which has its warts, including genital warts, makes me, my reader, my spouse, however far you plan to cast this net, "amoral". Because that's obviously what you imply, if the alternative is for the "moral."

I have several books in my library that are fantastic reads - except for the problems I mentioned or worse, their incessant Christian-bashing. fwiw, the "christian-bashing" may in fact be a reflex to the very situation I mentioned above.

I do hope there's a market for wholesome, non-religious fiction out there.

there is a market for people who do not say "fuck" but instead curse under their breath. there is a market for chaste men and women. as mentioned, Koontz is one of them...I have come to loathe his preaching and magic dogs, but he's still selling millions of copies of each release. But do not assume because I'd rather read (and write) Stephen King you are somehow my moral superior without any, you know, actual knowledge of me.

Gravity
01-19-2013, 12:20 AM
No one is saying Tricon is your moral superior, QL; he (or she) didn't even allude to it. They're simply stating reading and writing "wholesome, non-religious fiction" is what they prefer.

No sense jumping down their throat for a perceived wrong ...

cornflake
01-19-2013, 01:12 AM
No one is saying Tricon is your moral superior, QL; he (or she) didn't even allude to it. They're simply stating reading and writing "wholesome, non-religious fiction" is what they prefer.

No sense jumping down their throat for a perceived wrong ...

I dunno, when you refer to reading something with (or the things themselves) profanity, sex and violence as "wading through garbage and rot," I'd say that believing your view to be universal and morally superiour seems pretty clearly conveyed.

Gravity
01-19-2013, 01:30 AM
Universal? Again, consider these comments were stated in the Christian Writing sub-forum; I'd wager opposite comments can be found in other sub-forums.

And I have no dog in this fight. For a season I wrote (and had published) some Christian fiction. The stories garnered good reviews, but with my new series and going forward, my agent is now pitching my stuff to the general market. And we're getting some interest, thankyouverymuch. :D

Did I feel myself "morally superiour" to others with my CBA works? No, nor do I now consider myself above my CBA brethren because I'm taking a different set of tales to a different market.

The thing is, for years non-Christian folks have accused us Christians of being thin-skinned. Perhaps some are, but from the tenor of the above posts, I think the shoes can fit other feet as well.

In other words, chill, friends. There's enough room in this crazy writing boat for us all.

MacAllister
01-19-2013, 01:45 AM
Gravity is right, folks - let's please be gentle with one another, and respectful of one another's differences in outlook.

Gravity
01-19-2013, 01:46 AM
Thanks, Mac! ;)

Lavern08
01-22-2013, 07:35 PM
there is a market for people who do not say "fuck" but instead curse under their breath. there is a market for chaste men and women...

Wow!

I did not expect to see the F-word in here. :(

Robert Gonko
04-10-2013, 06:26 AM
My wife calls my book, The Inheritance, a 'Christian crossover.' I wrote it for everybody, not just Christians. The MC is a Christian who has to face some very secular situations and he sometimes forgets to rely on God to help him.