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dirtsider
11-19-2010, 01:40 AM
Another post on the AW Roundtable got me thinking. While most of my magic will not disrupt technology (this is an urban fantasy), I was wondering about digital cameras. So my question is: what kind of "film" do digital cameras use? (Obviously, I don't use digital cameras. But then, I rarely take pictures.) I take it, digital pictures are stored on a chip in electronic format, correct? Much like a flash drive or CD? Whereas film cameras (like the disposible kinds) use actual film, resulting in a negative.

Thanks!

OneWriter
11-19-2010, 01:55 AM
Yes. They are called memory cards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_card).

Drachen Jager
11-19-2010, 02:07 AM
Film cameras focus light on a strip of film which begins a light-activated chemical process.

Digital cameras focus light on a light sensitive microchip which transfers that information to a memory card.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_photography

Wikipedia is the author's best friend.

See this (http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/cameras-photography/digital/digital-camera2.htm) too.

dirtsider
11-19-2010, 05:57 PM
Thanks!! Yeah, my Google-fu wasn't up to snuff yesterday. I did find an interesting article about how digital film doesn't work as well when printing out pictures on larger stock. I'll have to find it again.

mgencleyn
11-20-2010, 12:20 AM
What constraints do you have on technology? If the magic can interfere with light, then most images in any camera would be affected during capture.

benbradley
11-20-2010, 01:11 AM
Yes. They are called memory cards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory_card).


Film cameras focus light on a strip of film which begins a light-activated chemical process.

Digital cameras focus light on a light sensitive microchip which transfers that information to a memory card.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_photography

Wikipedia is the author's best friend.

See this (http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/cameras-photography/digital/digital-camera2.htm) too.

Yes, this is a distinction - in a film camera, the image is both detected and stored on the film. In a digital camera the image is detected by one type of microchip, and then stored on another type. Here's a pertinent article to the "detecting" chip:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_sensor


Thanks!! Yeah, my Google-fu wasn't up to snuff yesterday. I did find an interesting article about how digital film doesn't work as well when printing out pictures on larger stock. I'll have to find it again.
Firstly, don't say "digital film" because that confuses the issue - film is only used in the "old-fashioned analog" cameras. Just say digital camera or digital picture.

As for the "larger stock" problem, it has to do with the resolution, and film has the same problem as digital - if you take a film picture with a small negative and blow it up really big, it'll look grainy. Here's an article that goes into that:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_versus_film_photography

But that might be more than you wanted to know about all this.

dirtsider
11-22-2010, 06:53 PM
Thanks! I generally go with the idea of "better to have the info and not need it than need it and not have it".

I still haven't decided whether the magic interferes with the camera due to electrical issues or if my MC just prefers not to have something that needs to be/can be downloaded with 'sensitive' information. If it's an electrical issue, then I need to think about extending that kind of issue to other electronics. If it's just a quirk that my MC has, then I don't need to worry about it. (My MCs have access to a private dark room.)