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Elias Graves
11-18-2010, 03:31 AM
Slaves were frenquently captured during wars, so I'm going to presume that Julius carried some back to Rome following his raid on Britain in 43 BC.

If anyone knows a great deal about the details of Roman slavery, can you advise me if the following is a plausible scenario? Based on what I've read so far, I believe it is, however, I've yet to locate a source that offers much detailed information on the Roman practices.

The scenario is this:
Julius returns to Rome following his raid carrying the spoils of war, including slaves. One slave, a pregnant female, is sold to a family in Rome. Her child is also property of the family, I believe.
That child, as an adult, is impregnated by her owner. This appears to have been common. The child, a male, is also property, I believe.
Roman men often kept very well educated slaves as personal advisors, accountants and even business managers.
How likely is it that a Roman citizen would use his own slave/son in such a role? I can't find anything that addresses this particular situation. A point that fine may never be fully settled, but much of a WIP is dependent upon this situation. I don't want to move ahead in the planned manner if this situation isn't plausible.
Anybody want to take a stab? Please?

Thanks.
EG

whacko
11-18-2010, 03:49 AM
Hi Elias,

I'll take a stab but I don't know if it'll help. Especially since there's a case of what you're talking about at the back of my mind, obstinately refusing to come forward. It may have had something to do with Hadrian, he of the Wall fame too.

But, as you said yourself, Roman men often kept very well educated slaves as personal advisors, accountants and even business managers...

So even if it's not likely, it's not beyond the realms of impossibility either.

The Roman class system is becoming less like the Hollywood ideal as time goes on.

Only recently, new research turned up the fact that a chariot driver, think Ben Hur, was the highest paid sports star of all time. That's EVER. This lad, in his career, earned the equivalent of billions in today's money. Yet we seem to think that chariot drivers were slaves.

So my point is... why the hell not. But I stand to be corrected.

Regards

Whacko

lbender
11-18-2010, 03:54 AM
I am not an expert on Rome and their slaves. However, in any slave culture, owners always varied dramatically in how they treated their slaves. Look at the US just before the Civil War.

If you want examples in literature. look at Ben Hur. The hero (Charlton Heston in the movie), enslaved, ends up being freed and adopted by his Roman owner.

The owner could fall in love with the kid's mother and want to please her. Human emotions are unpredictable. If he has no other kids, or his kids are huge disappointments to him, that could also make him feel differently about this kid, slave or not.

So yeah, I would say it's plausible

Medievalist
11-18-2010, 04:16 AM
Slaves were frenquently captured during wars, so I'm going to presume that Julius carried some back to Rome following his raid on Britain in 43 BC.

You've got the date wrong, and it's extremely unlikely that he took slaves back from either attempt at invasion.

He failed. He never seems to have received the promised tribute, and had less than a 100 hostages.

Here's a decent summary, which cites the standard academic / scholarly study of Roman slavery:

http://abacus.bates.edu/~mimber/Rciv/slavery.htm

Elias Graves
11-18-2010, 06:00 PM
You've got the date wrong, and it's extremely unlikely that he took slaves back from either attempt at invasion.

He failed. He never seems to have received the promised tribute, and had less than a 100 hostages.

Here's a decent summary, which cites the standard academic / scholarly study of Roman slavery:

http://abacus.bates.edu/~mimber/Rciv/slavery.htm

Thanks. That link was very informative.

EG