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Carole
09-29-2005, 01:21 AM
How do you know? I am reading and re-reading, red pen in hand. I am fairly happy with what I see, but...isn't there always a but?

Two things are throwing me. One is that I have found a bit of regurgitation here and there from one chapter to the next. Another is that I am definitely not as passionate about this subject as I was two months ago. I'm trying, but so far it isn't there.

If I let this sit and stew, sure I might come back to eventually, but it won't always be as timely as it is now. In fact, the topic may be covered by someone else and I could miss that loop altogether.

What advice can any of you offer? If I condense it, I could make a nice FAT article out of it. Healthy, even. But if I force myself to go on and finish the book, there might just be a lot more rewards at the end of that rainbow.

Pat~
09-29-2005, 02:00 AM
My 2 cents....do the article first. You can build your credibility for the book that way. (Also test whether or not you want to stick with it.) A book is a major commitment of time, and you will likely fizzle unless you're absolutely certain it must be written. Plus, it's alot harder to find book publishers than article publishers; your article audience can be wider, you can resubmit it to several markets, etc.

StoryG27
09-29-2005, 02:06 AM
I don't know much about writing articles, but I would say do the article. If you continue with a book you just don't care about anymore, you run the risk of boring yourself and the reader. The article might even renew your enthusiasm and get going in a different direction for another book with a topic you care more about. Besides, your chances of publishing an article are much greater and it builds credibility. Best of luck, whatever you decide!

scfirenice
09-29-2005, 02:16 AM
I agree with the above, having the inside track on the work too I think you COULD condense it down. Maybe even make a series of articles out of it instead. I would think there is a wide market for the subject. ALSO letting it sit longer is going to hurt not help. The further you build your life away from the subject, the less steam you are going to have writing against it.

Carole
09-29-2005, 03:21 AM
I agree with the above, having the inside track on the work too I think you COULD condense it down. Maybe even make a series of articles out of it instead. I would think there is a wide market for the subject. ALSO letting it sit longer is going to hurt not help. The further you build your life away from the subject, the less steam you are going to have writing against it.

Ok...that actually helps a lot. All of the comments help a lot and really reinforce what I was obviously thinking already, but SC...since you have read for me, you get what I am going after.

This is good. This is workable. I honestly hadn't thought about writing articles and then following them with a book. And yes, SC, you are aware of the timeframe issue with this, so I totally agree with you. It has had to sit on the back burner with my move and everything for long enough.

Wow. So now I have more questions. Is there a standard amount of time that you have to wait before resubmitting to other publications? I can't use the article I sold to Llewellyn for 3 years. Is that pretty much the norm?

Is it different finding a home for a series rather than a single article?

Sheesh. I am such a noob.

scfirenice
09-29-2005, 05:22 AM
Good Questions. DOn't have any answers. Maybe JDK or Rg can help us out. They're article writers...isn't that the techincal term?

Carole
09-29-2005, 05:26 AM
beats me

Zoe King
09-29-2005, 07:36 AM
I don't think there is a standard amount of time, it varies with the magazine, but the way to get around the problem is to rewrite the piece, approaching it from a slightly different angle, then give it a different title.

I suspect it's harder to place a series, but if the subject matter is strong enough, an editor somewhere will bite.

PattiTheWicked
09-29-2005, 04:38 PM
I'm in the opposite boat. I sat down to write a series of articles and realized I had a potential book on my hands. I hadn't planned to spend this much time on it, but I realize now it's got some serious potential.

aka eraser
09-29-2005, 05:09 PM
If all you've sold is first rights, unless your contract specifies otherwise, you can resell the piece anytime after the first hits print. Many contracts specify that reprints credit the first publication ie: This article first appeared in the June 2005 issue of Writers Rule.