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Snappy
11-11-2010, 02:04 AM
For all of the authors on the boards, how long did it take you to get that YES? Whether the yes be from an agent, ebook editor, or editor? Can you share submission stats?

This is purely out of curiousity. Thanks! :)

Phaeal
11-11-2010, 05:05 PM
Generally long enough to write a second book, and a third, and a fourth... ;)

scarletpeaches
11-11-2010, 05:08 PM
It averages out at around three months from submission to contract offer.

Emily Winslow
11-11-2010, 05:24 PM
It took me years (decades!) to get the idea/experience/skills for the right book. Once I did:

Started it summer 2006
Finished it summer 2007; started querying
Signed with Donald Maass Agency in Sept, I think. Maybe October.
Pre-empt from Random House in January or February 2008

There are many routes to success. I look forward to seeing others' stats!

Amarie
11-11-2010, 05:40 PM
It took me years (decades!) to get the idea/experience/skills for the right book. Once I did:


There are many routes to success. I look forward to seeing others' stats!


This. It took me twelve years to finally get the right combination of writing skills and ideas to get a publishable book.

Once I had that, it took 2 months to get an agent, five more months after I signed before it went on submission, 2 months to get a firm offer from a publisher, then a pub date scheduled 16 months after that.

Miss Plum
11-11-2010, 05:53 PM
Countless years to write something publishable. Five months of querying to get an agent. (We supposedly go out on sub in a few weeks.)

scarletpeaches
11-11-2010, 05:57 PM
If we're counting 'years until you write something publishable', then dear God...I win so far.

32.

ghost
11-11-2010, 06:02 PM
Hmmm agent signed me in less than 24 hours.
Signed in March.
Sent out in June.
UK market - 4 weeks before an offer.
Sent out in July.
American market - 2 weeks and went into auction.

Adam
11-11-2010, 06:32 PM
A Reaper's Tale (subbed to e-pub) - 6 days
Strand (subbed direct to editor of above e-pub) - 6 days
Solus (querying agents) - Coming up to 2 months so far. :D

maestrowork
11-11-2010, 07:11 PM
10 months from query to contract. I assume you're talking about novels, of course. Short stories tend to be pretty quick.

ChaosTitan
11-11-2010, 07:13 PM
Three books, about 90 queries, over 3-4 years. Sometimes it takes more than one, and for me the third book was the charm. Queried 9 agents with it, and received 4 requests. One request became a referral to an agent who read it and offered three days later. A month and a half later, it went on sub to publishers; within a month, we had three offers and it sold at auction.

Carlene
11-11-2010, 07:21 PM
The longest was six months, the shortest, three days. I'd say on average it takes about two months.

Carlene

Sunnyside
11-11-2010, 07:24 PM
It took me three months to land an agent, based on 30 queries. Once I had an agent, it took 10 months to land a publisher.

That was nonfiction, biography, though, and the market is much quirkier now.

aruna
11-11-2010, 07:35 PM
If we're counting 'years until you write something publishable', then dear God...I win so far.

32.

Well, if we go that route... I beat ya! I wrote my first books when I was 8, so that makes it 39 years till I got published.

However, in my efforts to seriously pursue publishing it took about 3 years to practice on one book. The next one I wrote got an agent within days, and went to auction within 2 weeks of agent acceptance, got a publisher next day. Published a year later.

CheekyWench
11-11-2010, 07:39 PM
Wrote the 1st one... a year to write, a year to query & land the 1st one.
Wrote the 2nd one... 19 days for 1st draft, 2 months to edit & 6 weeks after querying to land 2nd one.
No agent though. I went straight to publishers. YMMV

scarletpeaches
11-11-2010, 07:39 PM
Well, if we go that route... I beat ya! I wrote my first books when I was 8, so that makes it 39 years till I got published.

However, in my efforts to seriously pursue publishing it took about 3 years to practice on one book. The next one I wrote got an agent within days, and went to auction within 2 weeks of agent acceptance, got a publisher next day. Published a year later.Experiences like yours give me hope.

I started writing stories (bad ones) when I was big enough to hold a pencil, so that would have been round about four or five. Learned to type a couple of years after that.

Always wrote. Always. It's my default setting. Didn't write anything of publishable standard 'til I was 32, though. I subbed LTC to an agent, they said no thanks. I was going to continue the agent route, then thought, "No. Build a name for yourself in the epub market first," and sold it to the first publisher I contacted.

When it comes to agents...I haven't subbed to one in a year. I've decided to keep my erotica for epubs and my agent-bait novel will be in a completely different genre. Here's to 2011!

Maybe this time next year I'll be able to quote your post and say "Me too," aruna!

MsGneiss
11-11-2010, 07:47 PM
It took me about three weeks of querying before I got a yes from an agent. Unfortunately, she wasn't able to sell it (through no fault of hers - it was just a really weird book, and difficult to sell) and the "yes" from the publisher never came. I just started querying my second book. I sent out my query to only two agents, who are essentially my dream agents working at my dream agencies. I got two yes-es literally right away - these yes-es were for a full manuscript, which is probably quite insignificant in the grand scheme of things, but I'm easily excitable, so this is very much a big deal to me. :)

Irysangel
11-11-2010, 08:11 PM
2 years of querying to get an agent, a year for the agent to sell the book, and 3 years before it hit shelves. Whew.

aruna
11-11-2010, 08:33 PM
When it comes to agents...I haven't subbed to one in a year. I've decided to keep my erotica for epubs and my agent-bait novel will be in a completely different genre. Here's to 2011!

Maybe this time next year I'll be able to quote your post and say "Me too," aruna!

I raise my glass to that!

cwfgal
11-11-2010, 09:18 PM
Well, I sent my first piece of fiction out with a query at the age of 17 and that was 39 years ago.

I didn't write a novel length work until I was 38. I queried it, but it (rightly) never went anywhere. Wrote the second novel at the age of 39, found an agent for it a few days after turning 40 and about three months into my querying process, and she sold it at auction three weeks after she first sent it out. So based on that you could say it took me 23 years from first send-out to published (for fiction--I had a lot of nonfiction stuff published starting at age 38). But for novel length works alone, it was two years and two novels.

I never have gotten any of my short fiction published, so for that it's been 39 years and counting, though I haven't submitted anything in years. I guess I do better writing long.

Beth

Ryan David Jahn
11-11-2010, 09:23 PM
First novel (written seventeen years ago): didn't sell.

Second novel (written fifteen years ago): didn't sell.

Third novel (written ten years ago): didn't sell.

Fourth novel (written eight years ago): didn't sell.

(There may or may not be a fifth novel in there somewhere; I'm not sure.)

Then I focused on screenplays for about seven years. Optioned one script three times, did a (non-WGA) work-for-hire gig, optioned another script. Then got tired of screenplays, started hating the business, felt creatively stifled, decided to get back to novels before I started to hate writing and not just the industry I was trying to work in.

Fifth novel (written between August and November 2008): submitted 9 December 2008; contracted 8 January 2009. So about a month.

Sixth novel (written between October 2008 and May 2009): submitted 22 May 2009; contracted on 19 June 2009. So, again, about a month.

Seventh novel was already contracted as part of a two-book deal: submitted on 2 April this year; accepted on 13 April.

Snappy
11-11-2010, 09:26 PM
I love hearing about everyone's stories and it gives me hope. Thanks! And please continue to share. :)

Jamesaritchie
11-11-2010, 11:05 PM
About a week for the agent. About the same time from the editor. I sold three short stories and a novel within a couple of months after I started writing. It would have been faster, but I had to write the novel after the agent said yes.

blacbird
11-11-2010, 11:28 PM
Eternity.

Which is another way of saying it never happened.

BrooklynLee
11-11-2010, 11:58 PM
It's hard to say how long it took me to write the first novel I queried with. It was an old idea that I tore up and redid over the course of about a year. It only took me two and a half weeks of querying to get an agent, we went on submission about three months after that, and I am still waiting for that 'yes' from a publisher... more than ten months later. Feels a lot longer, though.

Tasmin21
11-12-2010, 12:06 AM
Six months of querying to get the agent. Six weeks of being on sub to sell the book(s).

happywritermom
11-12-2010, 12:19 AM
I was a journalist for 11 years before I decided to stay home with the kids and focus on fiction/freelance.

The first novel took me two kids, multiple part-time jobs/contracts and four years to write. I queried a few agents and got nowhere, but I did get pregnant with twins. Over the next two years, the twin pregnancy, the newborn stage and the Amazon Break Through Novel Award competition gave me the perspective I needed to do a serious rewrite.

After about six more months of querying with the new version, I signed with my agent. It's been on sub for a year now, but it's a hard sell. It doesn't fit solidly into a particular genre. I'm halfway done with novel number 2, which is suspense/mystery with a literary edge. That should be an easier sell. I started number 2 about a year ago and hope to be finished by spring.

But ... everyone's path is different. We all learn differently and lead different lives with varying levels of responsibilty for others and lots of other passions pulling on us. It's best not to compare yourself with others.

Susan Littlefield
11-12-2010, 12:54 AM
About a week for the agent. About the same time from the editor. I sold three short stories and a novel within a couple of months after I started writing. It would have been faster, but I had to write the novel after the agent said yes.

Are you serious, James? You queried a novel before you wrote it?

The big question- did you tell the agent this?

MsGneiss
11-12-2010, 01:09 AM
About a week for the agent. About the same time from the editor. I sold three short stories and a novel within a couple of months after I started writing. It would have been faster, but I had to write the novel after the agent said yes.

You wrote the novel AFTER the agent said yes? How does that work???

Jamesaritchie
11-12-2010, 04:03 AM
Are you serious, James? You queried a novel before you wrote it?

The big question- did you tell the agent this?

I thought that's how you were supposed to do it. I simply didn't know any better. I never wanted to be a writer, and I knew nothing about writing, the submission process, or anything else. And there was no Internet to help me out. Besides, I thought it would take months to hear from her.

And, no, I didn't tell the agent. It never occurred to me to say anything about it in the query letter, and when she called a week after I mailed the query, I sort of figured out she thought I had a finished novel.

Instead of owning up, I asked for just a little time make some improvements, and she said fine, but that she had to have the novel by the first of the next month so an editor she knew would have time to fit it into a slot he had open.

I didn't lie to her. I did need make some improvements, the biggest one being to actually write the novel. I managed to write it in three weeks, and she sold it to the editor she had in mind.

I don;t recommend anyone else do the same, but it did teach me that what matters is the writing, not the procedure.

MsGneiss
11-12-2010, 04:50 AM
I thought that's how you were supposed to do it. I simply didn't know any better. I never wanted to be a writer, and I knew nothing about writing, the submission process, or anything else. And there was no Internet to help me out. Besides, I thought it would take months to hear from her.

And, no, I didn't tell the agent. It never occurred to me to say anything about it in the query letter, and when she called a week after I mailed the query, I sort of figured out she thought I had a finished novel.

Instead of owning up, I asked for just a little time make some improvements, and she said fine, but that she had to have the novel by the first of the next month so an editor she knew would have time to fit it into a slot he had open.

I didn't lie to her. I did need make some improvements, the biggest one being to actually write the novel. I managed to write it in three weeks, and she sold it to the editor she had in mind.

I don;t recommend anyone else do the same, but it did teach me that what matters is the writing, not the procedure.

But how can you query something that hasn't been written yet? I don't mean this in a rhetorical way, but a practical one. How did you know what to put in a query letter about a nonexistent book? (And I'm sorry about pressing the point, but this is one of the craziest things I've ever heard!)

KTC
11-12-2010, 05:08 AM
Eternity.

Which is another way of saying it never happened.

you are the sparkle in my life. i swear to god.

KTC
11-12-2010, 05:12 AM
For all of the authors on the boards, how long did it take you to get that YES? Whether the yes be from an agent, ebook editor, or editor? Can you share submission stats?

This is purely out of curiousity. Thanks! :)

-I wrote half of mine in 2003. (then I said fuck it...lets do something else.)
-I wrote the other half of mine in 2007. (then I chucked it aside.)
-I edited it in 2008.
-I queried a few (13) agents...had a few requests for (4)partials/(2)fulls. -The one who wanted to take me on quite being an agent. Then I chucked it aside.
-I submitted to a couple publishers and 3 agents in 2010. 3 weeks after my last submission, I was accepted.
-2 weeks after it was accepted I had an agent ask if it was still available. I had to tell her no, but when telling her no I told her I did happen to have another one ready. She is now reviewing it.

K1P1
11-12-2010, 05:30 AM
Don't know yet. I haven't finished a novel yet (they've all died) and none of them have been good enough that I'd show them to anyone.

Nonfiction is different though. I was approached and asked to write my first book, so it was handed to me. Still took ages to get a contract in place after that, though. Seems to me I got the offer in February and didn't have a signed contract until October of the same year.

Susan Littlefield
11-12-2010, 07:11 AM
I thought that's how you were supposed to do it. I simply didn't know any better. I never wanted to be a writer, and I knew nothing about writing, the submission process, or anything else. And there was no Internet to help me out. Besides, I thought it would take months to hear from her.

And, no, I didn't tell the agent. It never occurred to me to say anything about it in the query letter, and when she called a week after I mailed the query, I sort of figured out she thought I had a finished novel.

Instead of owning up, I asked for just a little time make some improvements, and she said fine, but that she had to have the novel by the first of the next month so an editor she knew would have time to fit it into a slot he had open.

I didn't lie to her. I did need make some improvements, the biggest one being to actually write the novel. I managed to write it in three weeks, and she sold it to the editor she had in mind.

I don;t recommend anyone else do the same, but it did teach me that what matters is the writing, not the procedure.

James, that is wild! You must have had a pretty concrete idea of what you wanted to write.

This was even before your westerns, correct?

We all have our process. :D

aruna
11-12-2010, 11:47 AM
Nonfiction is different though. I was approached and asked to write my first book, so it was handed to me. Still took ages to get a contract in place after that, though. Seems to me I got the offer in February and didn't have a signed contract until October of the same year.

Quite so. An agent has requested a proposal for a non-fiction book and I'm just finishing off the proposal; I told him it would take three weeks and I'm right on schedule. It will go off to him on Monday. Let's see what happens then! It's my first non-fiction and I think I'm going to stick with that.

blacbird
11-12-2010, 12:08 PM
We all have our process.

Nope.

Emily Winslow
11-12-2010, 01:09 PM
-I queried a few (13) agents...had a few requests for (4)partials/(2)fulls. -The one who wanted to take me on quite being an agent. Then I chucked it aside.


If you had such interest, why did you "chuck it aside"?

KTC
11-12-2010, 02:13 PM
If you had such interest, why did you "chuck it aside"?

I'm a self-saboteur. I'm actually quite brilliant at it.

Broadswordbabe
11-12-2010, 02:14 PM
I've always written. Poetry, short stories etc. since I learned to write, pretty much. I've sold poetry here and there since my 20's, short stories since my 30's. Started and failed to finish several novels. First novel I finished I started in the mid 80's - finished in the mid 90's - sent it a few places, got a couple of 'nice' rejections but eventually realised it was pretty much unpublishable. Had a few abortive novel attempts in between. Second novel started in 03, went on sub in 06, got me an agent within a few months, but still hasn't found a publisher. Third novel started in 06 and finished in 09, still on sub. Fourth novel started in 07, finished in March 10 and yes, finally, SOLD in October.
So it's taken me about 15 years from when I started the first novel I actually managed to finish, or about 38 years (if you count from when I started writing).

scarletpeaches
11-12-2010, 02:18 PM
Nope.Oh shut up.
I'm a self-saboteur. I'm actually quite brilliant at it.And you're an idiot. You're too fucking talented to do this to yourself. I'd be pissed if someone stole a book from my house; you're potentially doing the same by stopping me reading yours.

Shara
11-12-2010, 02:24 PM
The first novel I started sending to publishers, I finished when I was 17.

First novel published this year as e-book - I was 40.

So, 23 years, I guess!

SUFFER THE CHILDREN starting doing the sub rounds in 2004 and was accepted in 2009, so it took five years to get picked up, and I've finished another novel and started two others since then.

The clear lesson from everyone's stories is, don't give up. Usually you have to be at it for years!

Shara

KTC
11-12-2010, 02:25 PM
And you're an idiot. You're too fucking talented to do this to yourself. I'd be pissed if someone stole a book from my house; you're potentially doing the same by stopping me reading yours.


but. but. but. in the end it got accepted. it WILL be published. i'm a tree sloth, fucking with the odds. it's bloody hard to get out of the tree when you're a tree sloth. i know i'm an idiot. it's a curse...but i fulfill the role quite brilliantly, actually.

oh. and thank you, my queen. i know that was hard to toss such a compliment onto such a douche bag. (yes...i did find the compliment in there. i did.) #silkwoodshower

scarletpeaches
11-12-2010, 02:27 PM
#silkwoodcompliment

Jamesaritchie
11-12-2010, 06:37 PM
James, that is wild! You must have had a pretty concrete idea of what you wanted to write.

This was even before your westerns, correct?

We all have our process. :D

I had no idea what I wanted to write. And, yes, it was before the five westerns you know about, though it was sort of a western novel.

I think there's something about having a real, professional, honest to golly agent or editor saying they want something that would make anyone, especially a spanking new writer, sit down and finish something in record time.

A big part of the problem with being a new writer is that no one has asked for anything, and you can't be sure they ever will.

Jamesaritchie
11-12-2010, 06:44 PM
But how can you query something that hasn't been written yet? I don't mean this in a rhetorical way, but a practical one. How did you know what to put in a query letter about a nonexistent book? (And I'm sorry about pressing the point, but this is one of the craziest things I've ever heard!)

It's no more difficult than querying something that has been written. You just make up an exciting little plot, put it down on paper in an exciting way, and send it in.

Once you start selling novels, this usually becomes the procedure. Only now my queries say, "The novel will be." Not that I follow the plot I put in a query. I never do, except in the loosest possible manner. The novel I deliver will be in the same genre, of course, but it usually doesn't read anything like the query letter said it would. How could it, since it hasn't been written, and story changes constantly when you don't outline.

After the first novel or two, a query letter is more a letter of intent, and an excuse for a publisher to give the writer a contract, than it is a synopsis of the actual novel.

And nonfiction writers constantly query books that haven't been written. It's standard there. The same is true for freelance writers. I never write an article until after the editor gives me the go ahead.

ether
11-12-2010, 07:06 PM
Love reading all these stories. It's inspiring for those of us still in the querying process. :)

I guess if I want to share my current stats...

First book, wrote in about 4 months. I didn't know a thing about how publishing worked or revision/editing, and I was under the impression "the longer the book, the better!" So I had a YA paranormal at 92k.

First agent I queried at a big-name agency asked for the full. She passed it to another agent who worked with me for awhile on revisions, gave me some line-by-line notes on my first chapter. From February 2010 to July 2010, I worked my butt off on those revisions and came out with a squeaky-clean 72k version. The agent ended up passing but had a lot of praise of how much I'd improved in a short period of time and that my MS was strong. She asked me if I wasn't agented when I finished my next project to please send it to her. It was encouraging but I was devastated. Kept querying, but no luck.

So total query stats were about 45 rejections, 4 full requests and 2 partials. I still have a full out with an agent, but I don't imagine it'll go anywhere and I'm not so sure it should. I've set that novel aside to be rewritten.


My current MS I've only sent out one query for because I still want my current beta and a new beta to go over it. But that one query I sent out got a full request. :)

Saskatoonistan
11-12-2010, 07:07 PM
For my first novel it took about a six months from submitting to my publisher to acceptance. It then took another year for the book to hit bookstores.

For an agent, it was much harder. I started querying in 2006. I finally landed an agent in August 2010.

It was worth it, by the way. Having an agent is awesome!

KyraDune
11-12-2010, 07:11 PM
I started writing Flight of Dragons in April of 2009, finished it in February of 2010. I started submitting it in February and got the yes in October.

Susan Littlefield
11-12-2010, 07:26 PM
Nope.

Yep.

We have a path we have traveled to get to where we are today. So, you misunderstood my posting?

blacbird
11-13-2010, 11:47 AM
We have a path we have traveled to get to where we are today. So, you misunderstood my posting?

No misunderstanding, just that my personal experience has differed. I have tried to travel a path, many times, in many variations, and like the people in Blair Witch Project find myself right where I started, having gone nowhere, time after time. You want to call that a result of a "process"? If I have such a thing, I don't have clue one what it is.

Phaeal
11-13-2010, 05:14 PM
So a path leads nowhere. It's still a path. My only advice to you is: Don't go in that basement.

Margarita Skies
11-13-2010, 06:33 PM
Still waiting for it. :ROFL:

jscribbles
11-14-2010, 07:01 PM
2 weeks of querying, 3 weeks on submission.

I should add, however, that this is the second book I queried after three years of serious writing. I put the first away after about 100 passes. Took a break to have a kid before I wrote the second.

AngelaA
11-14-2010, 09:39 PM
One year to get agent #1 - 2nd ms I finished.
One month to get agent #2 - fourth ms I finished.

Still working on rewrites.

Shorts were a little faster - a few days to write it - a couple weeks to get contract.

san_remo_ave
11-14-2010, 09:59 PM
Slush pile submission was 10 mos to get a response which was a request to revise & resubmit, 2 rounds of R&R before offer. Total 13 mos.

erinbee
11-15-2010, 06:21 AM
In theory, four years since the first book my agent repped for me died in marketing and didn't sell.

My debut book: two months from idea to proposal, three days on submission before my first offer, and the deal closed within the week. Things felt very different with the second proposal; snappier response times, more excitement in the editor calls, offers on the table. I must say it was worth the wait!

happywritermom
11-15-2010, 06:26 AM
erinbee, no wonder it sold so fast. What a great idea for a book!!!!

Susan Littlefield
11-15-2010, 06:52 AM
No misunderstanding, just that my personal experience has differed. I have tried to travel a path, many times, in many variations, and like the people in Blair Witch Project find myself right where I started, having gone nowhere, time after time. You want to call that a result of a "process"? If I have such a thing, I don't have clue one what it is.

Blacbird,

For me, the process is the footwork involved in trying to sell our work and ourselves as writers, even if one has not yet reached the goal. But, for everyone it is different. No two people ever have the exact same experience.

Susan Littlefield
11-15-2010, 06:53 AM
So a path leads nowhere. It's still a path. My only advice to you is: Don't go in that basement.

Excellent advice!

blacbird
11-15-2010, 09:21 AM
Don't go in that basement.

It's cool and peaceful in here.

Except for the roaches.

triceretops
11-15-2010, 10:27 AM
My story is a bit similar to Aruna's, since we're about the same age and our success came a bit earlier.

I came out of the gate really fast in 1987 with a slew of shorts that sold to some nice slick magazines--got me right into the SFWA. I wanted to try a novel but a great fiction mentor told me to write non-fiction books if I wanted to break in fast, 'cause non-fiction outsold fiction 3-1. I wrote two non-fiction books, one right on top of the other, with loads of platform. They both sold within two weeks of querying to nice commercial publishers--real nice advances and all that. TV, radio and newspaper interviews followed. Books earned out and are still on Amazon to this day.

A year later I wrote three novels in a row and sent out hard-mail queries. Picked up a huge A-list agent that wanted two books, and this happened within two months. Both books were repped for 18 months before they were dropped. One was sent to a huge producer and director, and they got ready to sign for the rights. Three weeks later, Crichton's Jurassic Park nixed my deal because my book was too similar to his. Go frickin figure.

Discouraged, I quit writing in 1992, believing that the fella who told me novels were a beotch was telling the truth.

I picked back up on writing in Jan of 2005 (13-year hiatus), right around the time I joined AW. I'm on my third agent now and I've written twelve novels and one non-fiction book during this time period. None of these agents has been able to sell any of my books, and I've had about five out there under agent rep, with about three more to go with this last agent. Fingers are currently broken in the crossed pose.

I've always gotten an agent within three months. In fact, I've had so many agent offers I could afford to give several contracts away. That's never been the problem with me. Agents, although they've praised my work up one side and down the other, have never sold anything for me. I've sold the last six novels directly to the small/indie press print publishers.

Although I've had semi-major deals and ended up in all the bookstores and libraries during my earlier career, I've never seemed to kick-start it back into that high gear again. That white-hot spotlight, she eludes me, and has for the past five years. I yearn for the major NY deal for a novel. All told, including the first novels I ever wrote in pencil and on an IBM typewriter starting in 1978, I've penned about 17 novels and three non-fiction books. Every time I send any of my books to small press, I'm offered contracts. I've torn up more agent and small press contracts than any writer on this board, I'm pretty damn certain of that. Oh, my novels sell within 30-50 days to small press. And it's the Canadian publishers who love me--can't figure that one out.

I landed my last agent in 2 1/2 months, after four other agent offers. My current agent wants every book in my inventory, including some of the books I've already published. My thriller has been on agent sub for about five months and just went to second rounds. She's currently sending out another YA fantasy on top of the thriller.

I don't have that wide-eyed wanderlust anymore. Something inside of me has died through all this, and yet I know I should be grateful. I'll let my agent run through my inventory. If nothing sells, I'm prepared to hang up novel writing forever -- just getting too old for it.

Tri