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profen4
11-10-2010, 11:27 PM
Hi guys,

I'm wondering if anyone knows if there is a symbol associated with King Arthur (or the knights of the round table) or Merlin. I've scoured the net to no avail.

If there isn't anything, you guys have any thoughts as to what symbol might be good for this? Obviously I thought of a circle for the round table, but it's too boring. But I don't want it to be overly complex either.

In a related question, do you know of a symbol that is related to 'sacrifice' but not "the cross." preferably something that would have been taken from the same time period (or earlier).

Thanks for your help guys, I really appreciate it.

regdog
11-10-2010, 11:41 PM
Well there's the red dragon which was the symbol of the Pendragons.
You could use a sword for Excalibur.
A staff could be used to symbolize Merlin

Kenn
11-10-2010, 11:47 PM
If I think of King Arthur, I think of Excalibur, although it is not really a symbol. He was a Pendragon (which means head dragon) and I think that a red dragon was his battle standard. I seem to recall Merlin prophecising about a battle of two dragons (Celts and Saxons) also.

A lamb is sometimes used to symbolise sacrifice (as in sacrificial lamb), but I don't know about the period you are interested in.

dclary
11-10-2010, 11:48 PM
He was Arthur Pendragon (last dragon) -- so I imagine a Dragon Rampant would be a good symbol. You could go with whatever you can make work in context of the story, though.

Merlin was a druid or sorceror depending on your source. He would have no outward symbol I would think.

PeterL
11-11-2010, 12:18 AM
Arthur's symbol was a red dragon.

profen4
11-11-2010, 01:33 AM
Thanks guys. That actually helps a lot!

DavidZahir
11-12-2010, 05:11 AM
Arthur pretty much means "bear."

hammerklavier
11-13-2010, 02:37 AM
In "the sword and the stone," Merlin always had an owl companion.

Carmy
11-13-2010, 07:06 AM
Merlin was reputedly a Druid. Try a triskele.

Medievalist
11-13-2010, 10:00 AM
Merlin was reputedly a Druid. Try a triskele.

Err, only on modern texts.

Now, there is a case for making him a swine-herd, via the Suibne tradition.

Also a bad poet driven mad by love, who loses his wits and subsists on acorns he wrests from pigs, whilst living as a mad poet hermit under an oak tree.

shaldna
11-13-2010, 04:14 PM
Merlin was supposed to be able to turn into some sort of hawk (a merlin?) IIRC so I would have associated the bird with him.

Carmy
11-13-2010, 09:17 PM
Okay, I'll accept that.

Merlin was still a Celt so a triskele would be apt.

Rufus Coppertop
11-14-2010, 04:25 AM
Merlin was supposed to be able to turn into some sort of hawk (a merlin?)

In which particular tradition?

It would surely have to be pre-Galfridian as there is nothing about this in Monmouth or the Prose Vulgate Cycle.

Xelebes
11-14-2010, 05:03 AM
Lady-in-the-Lake? In know it's a plot element but it is an English archetype because of it. Where in Slavic cultures a lady-in-the-lake is a bad omen, it is a good omen in English world. Or go with the Rampant Red Dragon.

Medievalist
11-14-2010, 05:22 AM
Merlin was supposed to be able to turn into some sort of hawk (a merlin?) IIRC so I would have associated the bird with him.

That's also modern, and not derived from medieval tradition or texts.