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Perks
11-10-2010, 05:14 PM
ETA - I am reviving a three year old thread, because I'm finally -- after all this time -- actually writing this scene for my new book. It surprised me to see how long ago I was thinking of this. Weird.

(I'm not using programs like Google Translate on purpose. They are too literal-minded for what I'm doing.)

Anyway, anyone got anything new to add to this one? So far we've got: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Greek, Latin, Cantonese, Scots Gaelic, Welsh, Japanese, and Mandarin.

Here's the OP:

I'm trying to develop a thought for a story I'm writing and there's a phrase I'd like to see in several different languages, but I don't exactly trust online translating machines.

For any and all comers, how would you say "freer than me"?

WalkingContradiction
11-10-2010, 05:45 PM
German: "freier als ich"

French: "plus libre que moi"

Perks
11-10-2010, 05:47 PM
Now that's just weird. Not two seconds ago, I hit the send button on a PM lamenting that I did not remember enough of my German to translate that.

(German was the only one I was ever able to get comfortable with.)

Thank you!

Lauretta
11-10-2010, 05:50 PM
In Italian it goes: Piu' libero di me

DamaNegra
11-10-2010, 06:06 PM
Spanish: Ms libre que yo.

Perks
11-10-2010, 06:09 PM
This is great guys. Thank you. More! More!

Sofie
11-10-2010, 08:46 PM
Swedish: "Friare n mig" or "friare n jag" (Freer than me/Freer than I)

Perks
11-10-2010, 09:08 PM
Thank you, Sofie. Very cool.

whimsical rabbit
11-10-2010, 09:17 PM
In Greek:

"Πιο ελεύθερος από μένα" if the person you're referring to is male.

"Πιο ελεύθερη από μένα" if the person is female.

In Latin characters:

"Pio eleftheros apo mena." (male adjective)

"Pio eleftheri apo mena." (female adjective) The 'i' at the end is pronounced as -ee (as in bee), not i (as in aye), if that makes any sort of sense. :e2hammer:

Perks
11-10-2010, 09:21 PM
Hey, rabbit, any way of rendering that Greek with our alphabet? I know that's a fairly stupid question, but I'm wondering what it sounds like.

Danger Jane
11-10-2010, 11:08 PM
Latin:

Liberior quam me

monkey see monkey do
11-10-2010, 11:50 PM
Cantonese:
比我更自由
Bei ngo gang ji yau

Perks
11-11-2010, 12:22 AM
You guys are awesome. Thank you.

Zelenka
11-11-2010, 02:21 AM
In Scots Gaelic it'd be something like 'Nas saoire na mise'.

Carmy
11-13-2010, 07:09 AM
Mwy rhwydd na fi. (Welsh)

Perks
11-13-2010, 07:28 AM
I love Welsh road signs. I drove through Wales last summer. Buy a vowel, dear people. Lol!

Thank you! That's a neat one.

Carmy
11-13-2010, 09:26 PM
But W is a vowel. LOL

Welsh has 28 letters in the alphabet but no J, K, Q, V, X or Z.

whimsical rabbit
11-13-2010, 10:00 PM
Hey, rabbit, any way of rendering that Greek with our alphabet? I know that's a fairly stupid question, but I'm wondering what it sounds like.

Sorry Perks, I didn't mean to confuse you. :e2smack:

The 'Latin' version I referred to would be exactly the same for English. Sorry if I wasn't clear.

So:

"Pio eleftheros apo mena," if "freer" is referring to a male

or

"Pio eleftheri apo mena," if you're talking about a female.

And like I indicated above, the 'i' at the end of 'eleftheri' is pronounced as -ee.

Does that make sense?

Perks
11-13-2010, 11:09 PM
Oooooh! I see. I misread. I thought it was one example of the phrase in Greek and one in Latin. You led me to the water, I just didn't drink.

Sorry about that! This is very helpful. Thank you.

whimsical rabbit
11-13-2010, 11:19 PM
Oooooh! I see. I misread. I thought it was one example of the phrase in Greek and one in Latin. You led me to the water, I just didn't drink.

Sorry about that! This is very helpful. Thank you.

LOL Don't worry. My stupid, probably. :D

kaitie
11-14-2010, 10:54 PM
Um...I'm gonna try this but someone else might come along and correct me cuz this is harder to say than I'd expected. I'm going with:

僕より自由の身にある。 (boku yori jiyuu no mi ni aru.)

That sense of freedom is used in a sense of bondage, almost like you're a slave to something and you're free of that. You could probably just say "Boku yori jiyuu da," but somehow it seems funny to me. I feel like you need a word for freedom that conveys a little more, so I went with this one. Also "boku" is a man's word, so if it's a woman thinking it, you can't really say that. Well, you could but it would sound funny (women are more likely to be atashi).

I have probably not helped at all, but to my credit this was harder than I thought!

not_HarryS
11-15-2010, 06:14 PM
Cantonese:
比我更自由
Bei ngo gang ji yau

I'd argue that the 更 here is a little redundant, but still grammatically correct.

In Mandarin, I'd say it's 比我自由 (bi wo ziyou)... sounds strange without a subject, though.

Perks
12-14-2013, 09:56 PM
Bumping and reviving the OP, because today, after all this time, I'm actually writing this scene.

Zelenka
12-14-2013, 10:27 PM
Got a bit better at Czech since this thread started - svobodnějš než jsem j or just svobodnějš než j or it could also be svobodnějš než mě. (That's 'freer than I am', 'freer than I' or 'freer than me'.)

Perks
12-14-2013, 10:44 PM
Ah, neat! Thank you. Will add it to the list.

CoolBlue
12-15-2013, 07:40 AM
Afrikaans: Vryer as ek.

HTH
CB

Torill
12-19-2013, 12:39 AM
I could give you a literal translation to Norwegian: friere enn meg (yes, it's very similar to the Swedish) - but I can't think of a single situation where anyone would actually say that in Norwegian. It looks completely weird to me. So to really help you, I need to know what you mean by 'freer than me'. Do you mean more liberated, as in having less inhibitions? In that case it would be mer frigjort enn meg. (literally more liberated than me) But if you mean having less restrictions, as in I'm a slave but she is free, it would be: har mer frihet enn meg = has more freedom than me.

MartinV
12-19-2013, 03:07 AM
Slovene: "Svobodnejši od mene." (you pronounce 'j' as 'y'; š sounds like sh)