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Cyia
11-05-2010, 04:39 AM
Is a stórín comparable to mija or sweetie for an endearment to use with a child? If not, could you tell me what is?

Millicent M'Lady
11-05-2010, 04:42 AM
It is indeed. :) Doesn't even have to be Gaelic though if you'd prefer. Pet and sweetheart are popular enough here. ETA: If you're using a Gaelic name, "ín" is often affectionately added to the end to mean "little". So, for example, Seanín. (Not spelled right --- needs a fada but I can't figure out how to do it.) Depends on your locale though -- I've only really heard it used in Galway and other Gaeltacht adjacent locales.

Cyia
11-05-2010, 04:47 AM
Thanks. I've got an American girl from an Irish household. She only uses a few things (like Da for Dad), and right now I've got her saying "sweetie" for her little sister, but it just looked weird to me. It seemed like there should have been a regional word for it.

(More used to Spanish than Irish around here, so I wasn't sure I had the right one.)

:)

Would the "in" at the end also apply to a girl. Her name is Brigid, so Brigidin?

Millicent M'Lady
11-05-2010, 04:57 AM
What era is your work set in? Depending on the era and region, it all depends. Da would tend to be more North Dublin dialect, though it is used elsewhere and was used more in the past.

I agree with your thoughts on "sweetie". When I read it, it strikes me as more of an American term of endearment. I've never actually heard of anyone being called Brigidín, affectionately or otherwise, but it does work for girls names so it should fit. :) How about "a leanbh"? It's not popular, but it means "child" and could be used affectionately.

ETA: Brídín I have heard if you fancied jigging her name slightly to Bríd.

Millicent M'Lady
11-05-2010, 05:00 AM
Also, if you want to send me a short excerpt for an opinion on whether the vernacular rings true, I'd be more than happy to take a look. :)

Cyia
11-05-2010, 05:03 AM
It's contemporary / fantasy. Her father is quite literally ancient. (And happily fang-free, no vampires here.)

Brigid is 6, and badly scarred from a fire. Her older sister is 14 and treats her like she's made of glass, always babying her, so rather than her given name, she calls her something that should equate to "sweetie" or "baby girl".


I always end up obsessing on details like this :(

Millicent M'Lady
11-05-2010, 05:18 AM
I do too! I'm terrible for it so I sympathise. You can probably get away with Da for it if you're not designating a home-town but it kind of jars with the Gaelic pet name as that tends to be a more rural practice. Hmm... I'm going to be obsessing now too! :D

How about "m'aineagailín beag ban" (My little white angel -- pronounced muh-angle-een be-yug bawn). Long but you could just shorten it to "m'aineagailín"?

Or, if she's talking about her to others, "poor creatur" (cray-tur -- poor creature) or "poor divil" (anglicised spelling of the Gaelic word for "devil") -- they'd be frequently used countrywide.

Xelebes
11-05-2010, 06:47 AM
It is indeed. :) Doesn't even have to be Gaelic though if you'd prefer. Pet and sweetheart are popular enough here. ETA: If you're using a Gaelic name, "ín" is often affectionately added to the end to mean "little". So, for example, Seanín. (Not spelled right --- needs a fada but I can't figure out how to do it.) Depends on your locale though -- I've only really heard it used in Galway and other Gaeltacht adjacent locales.

Is your language setting at UK English or UK Extended?

Millicent M'Lady
11-05-2010, 06:53 PM
Is your language setting at UK English or UK Extended?

English -- Ireland, as far as I can see, at least on Microsoft word anyway.

shaldna
11-06-2010, 03:59 AM
Up here we would use Cuddy to refer to a girl in general


Not everyone says Da either, it's a regional and class thing. I call my father Daddy, always have done, for alot of people it's Dad. Its the same with alot of words, be very careful not to slip into stereotypes, we don't all talk like father jack, some of us are perfectly capable of correctly pronouncing our words thank you very much.

I get really wound up when I see or read about and Irish character and it's all 'Jaysus' and 'ah begorrah' and 'top o' the morning te ya'

I'll tell you a little secret - most of us talk just like everyone else.

In terms of names You could have Beag (little) or Mhín (gentle) Sweet would be Milis

Cyia
11-06-2010, 04:14 AM
LoL, no phoentic writing from me. (I hate when people do that.) The "Da" thing was just an attempt at giving the character a place for his past without having to go overboard on the accents. (It felt wrong not to have some sort of indicator that stuck with him, and that was the mildest one I could think of.) It's the only thing of that sort period, but I wanted an endearment because he's about 500 years old, so some of his words haven't quite shifted to American English. Accent-wise, he sounds like a local.

His wife's dead (back to the fire again), so he's raised the two girls and his verbal quirks have become theirs. "Cuddy" sounds perfect.

Thanks :)