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seun
11-04-2010, 03:02 PM
After watching a recent BBC documentary on horror which went from the 1930s to the 70s, I'm curious which decade people think is the best for horror films.

So, what is it for you - 1930s to now?

Diana Hignutt
11-04-2010, 03:16 PM
Okay, I went 30/40's, but I'm not convinced that the 2000's horror aren't better. There are some modern horror movies that weren't remakes, etc. It should be noted that the torture porn films aren't for me, however.

But those early Universal films were what i grew up with, so...

(but, I love me some Hammer, too).

Haggis
11-04-2010, 03:24 PM
Klaatu barada nikto.

seun
11-04-2010, 03:25 PM
This is more difficult than I thought it would be. Some of my favourite films (Night of the Living Dead, The Crazies, The Thing) go from late sixties to the early eighties. But then there's Hammer's Dracula from 1958...

I think it has to be seventies for me. The Crazies, Dawn of the Dead, Halloween, Texas Chainsaw, Last House...

seun
11-04-2010, 03:26 PM
Klaatu barada nikto.

The Keanu Reeves version was better.

...legs it from thread...

Haggis
11-04-2010, 03:27 PM
My Dog, man! Think of the Pod People.

Diana Hignutt
11-04-2010, 03:31 PM
Shit, I forgot the 70's had The Exorcist, The Omen, etc... damn this is too hard...

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 03:33 PM
The Keanu Reeves version was better.
*leans over to an intercom*

Kill Them!

seun
11-04-2010, 03:34 PM
Shit, I forgot the 70's had The Exorcist, The Omen, etc... damn this is too hard...

Sorry. :D

Calla Lily
11-04-2010, 03:35 PM
The Keanu Reeves version was better.

...legs it from thread...

*calls the local psychotherapy club to come use seun as a training case*

Of the choices, I had to go with the birth of Hammer, although I lurve giant bugs and Karloff.

Haggis
11-04-2010, 04:37 PM
Of course, Night of the Living Dead (the original) is still my favorite....


Yeah, they're dead. They're all messed up.

seun
11-04-2010, 04:38 PM
Of course, Night of the Living Dead (the original) is still my favorite....

That's because (and this is a scientific fact), it's the greatest film ever made.

Calla Lily
11-04-2010, 04:48 PM
"They're coming to get you, Barbara..."

Haggis
11-04-2010, 04:52 PM
That's because (and this is a scientific fact), it's the greatest film ever made.

QFT


"They're coming to get you, Barbara..."
Possibly one of the two greatest movie lines ever.

brainstorm77
11-04-2010, 05:00 PM
I voted the 80's. That's when I remember renting VHS like Return of the LIving Dead etc, Blood Beach etc...

hester
11-04-2010, 05:25 PM
I voted 70's. John Carpenter's "Halloween" theme music alone is worth the price of admission :).

robeiae
11-04-2010, 05:31 PM
In what decade was Titanic?

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 05:51 PM
That's because (and this is a scientific fact), it's the greatest film ever made.Debbie does Dallas didn't even get a look-in.

I vote 80's. Day of the Dead wins all.

seun
11-04-2010, 06:07 PM
Choke on 'em.

childeroland
11-04-2010, 06:09 PM
2000's, because of Asian horror.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 06:22 PM
Choke on 'em.Best fatal stretching of vocal chords EVER.

seun
11-04-2010, 06:23 PM
Interesting that nobody has (yet) voted 90s. To be honest, nothing much comes to mind when I think of the first half of the decade. Am I forgetting something good?

Diana Hignutt
11-04-2010, 06:28 PM
Interesting that nobody has (yet) voted 90s. To be honest, nothing much comes to mind when I think of the first half of the decade. Am I forgetting something good?

Weren't the early 90's just Friday the 13th 8-15 and Halloween 7-13?

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 06:28 PM
Interesting that nobody has (yet) voted 90s. To be honest, nothing much comes to mind when I think of the first half of the decade. Am I forgetting something good?

Not really. ;)

The 80's (my vote) were the height of the teen slasher horror flick, but the genre swelled and died by the time the 90's rolled around. While "Scream" did reinvigorate the genre when it came out mid-decade, there was very little of note made in the early 90's. At least in the U.S.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 06:34 PM
Weren't the early 90's just Friday the 13th 8-15 and Halloween 7-13?An Psycho 4.

There was the remake of Night of the Living Dead, but that was a bit... well... shit.

Haggis
11-04-2010, 06:39 PM
An Psycho 4.

There was the remake of Night of the Living Dead, but that was a bit... well... shit.
Thank you.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 06:42 PM
You're welcome

seun
11-04-2010, 06:46 PM
I didn't mind the remake of NOTLD. In my so humble opinion, it was better than the remake of Dawn.

Haggis
11-04-2010, 06:48 PM
Oooo. Wicker Man. 70s.

Crap. Apparently I like all of them from the 30s on. At least through the 70s.

robeiae
11-04-2010, 06:49 PM
90s?

Scream, right? That was the best of the lot, by far. Then there was Deep Rising, more of a monster movie really. I like that movie a lot. Great cast.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 06:54 PM
In my so humble opinion, it was better than the remake of Dawn.Well, yes. But then so is a mild case of swine flu.


Wasn't Tremors in the 90s? Would you call Tremors horror?

seun
11-04-2010, 07:08 PM
Well, yes. But then so is a mild case of swine flu.


Wasn't Tremors in the 90s? Would you call Tremors horror?

Tremors was 89 or 90. Can't remember exactly. Great film, but not really horror.

ETA. Just checked. 1990.

Jcomp
11-04-2010, 07:09 PM
Got to go with the 70's. I don't even think it's close. It had some of the best of everything.

Slashers with Halloween and Black Christmas. Awesome psychological horror like Don't Look Now. Ghost stories / haunted house stories like Burnt Offerings. Absolutely outstanding sci-fi horror with Alien and the Invasion of the Body Snatchers remake. Obvious influential horror flicks like The Exorcist and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Even the generally poor, exploitative splatter-punk flicks (Suspiria, Zombi 2, Phantasm) were more creative and / or audacious than the modern equivalents.

Like any other decade, it has its share of (largely forgotten) dreck as well, but the 70's really set the bar for modern horror.

robeiae
11-04-2010, 07:10 PM
Carpenter's The Thing came out in '82.

/discussion

Satori1977
11-04-2010, 07:12 PM
This is hard, because there have been good and bad horror movies in each decade. I love the Halloween and Elm Street (from the 80's) movies probably the best, but Jason? Not so much. I had never seen the Friday the 13th movies, and just started watching them (in honor of Halloween, I always watch a lot of horror movies in October). Watched the first 3 and the Final Friday, and so far, they all suck. Not scary at all. Hubby and I were actually laughing and yelling at the tv, some parts were so stupid.

70's were also great for the Exorcist, Dead and Chainsaw movies. The 60's and earlier were not my type of movies.

But I do think there were some good movies in the 90's as well. Scream, Cape Fear (not monster movie, but still scary IMO), Lord of Illusions, couple of Hellraiser movies, Event Horizon. Probably some more, but that is what I got off the top of my head.

Diana Hignutt
11-04-2010, 07:17 PM
Ah yes, Event Horizon is the shizzle.

robeiae
11-04-2010, 07:18 PM
Yeah, I like that one too.

Jcomp
11-04-2010, 07:33 PM
I like Event Horizon as well. Always felt like it got a bad rap with some fans for being a Paul Anderson flick (the guy who did Mortal Kombat and all those lousy Resident Evil movies).

Haggis
11-04-2010, 07:33 PM
http://www.psdeluxe.com/images/stories/webtuts/horror_brushes/Horror_Sci_Fi_Movie_Posters_by_motion_suggests.png

seun
11-04-2010, 07:37 PM
I had never seen the Friday the 13th movies, and just started watching them (in honor of Halloween, I always watch a lot of horror movies in October). Watched the first 3 and the Final Friday, and so far, they all suck.

The F13th films did little for me, too. The first is just a crappy version of Halloween and the endless sequels are terrible.

shawkins
11-04-2010, 07:42 PM
There's a strong case to be made for the 1970s (Jcomp just made it, actually), but I'm going to have to go with the '80s. Mostly that's because that's when Cronenberg and Carpenter did their best work:

Videodrome, The Thing, The Fly, Prince of Darkness, Dead Ringers

There were a couple of decent franchises:

Evil Dead
Hellraiser (I thought HR2 was OK)
Re-Animator
Return of the Living Dead

There were also quite a few good one-offs:

Nightmare on Elm St. (happily, they resisted the temptation to cash in on this one with inferior sequels)
American Werewolf in London
The Hitcher
Near Dark
The Vanishing (original, of course)


Interesting that nobody has (yet) voted 90s. To be honest, nothing much comes to mind when I think of the first half of the decade. Am I forgetting something good?

I liked In the Mouth of Madness

seun
11-04-2010, 07:47 PM
There were also quite a few good one-offs:

Nightmare on Elm St. (happily, they resisted the temptation to cash in on this one with inferior sequels) :roll:
American Werewolf in London
The Hitcher
Near Dark
The Vanishing (original, of course)


Can't believe I forgot about The Hitcher.

shawkins
11-04-2010, 07:48 PM
I didn't mind the remake of NOTLD. In my so humble opinion, it was better than the remake of Dawn.

Really? I loved the Dawn remake, but I've got a lot higher tolerance for remakes than you do. Out of curiosity, do you think you would have felt any different if they'd set it in something other than a mall?

I thought the NOTLD remake was pretty decent as well. I'm surprised that Tom Savini didn't direct more features.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 07:54 PM
I loved the Dawn remake:ban

seun
11-04-2010, 07:58 PM
Really? I loved the Dawn remake, but I've got a lot higher tolerance for remakes than you do. Out of curiosity, do you think you would have felt any different if they'd set it in something other than a mall?

The Dawn remake was more or less everything I don't like about remakes. I don't think the setting would have helped to change that for me. Mind you, the mall was just about the only issue it had in common with the first - if I remember correctly. Which I probably don't given the complete lack of a lasting impression it made.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:01 PM
I loved the Dawn remake, too. :Shrug:

I also loved the original Dawn.

And I thought the original NOTLD was fabulously boring.

seun
11-04-2010, 08:05 PM
And I thought the original NOTLD was fabulously boring.

Them's fighting words. Outside, now.

Haggis
11-04-2010, 08:05 PM
And I thought the original NOTLD was fabulously boring.
:eek:

*plots against Chaos*

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 08:06 PM
See this is why I could never be a mod.

brainstorm77
11-04-2010, 08:06 PM
I also liked the Dawn and the Night remake... The Day remake however, was horrid.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:08 PM
Them's fighting words. Outside, now.


:eek:

*plots against Chaos*

:D

I do understand the movie's film and cultural legacy, and its contribution to the horror genre. I can't dispute that. It just didn't do it for me.

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 08:08 PM
I've deliberately avoided the Day remake.

Although I did get a nice warm shiver when I hear it was going direct to DVD. :)

seun
11-04-2010, 08:09 PM
I also liked the Dawn and the Night remake... The Day remake however, was horrid.

Never saw it. By all accounts, I missed bog all.

Calla Lily
11-04-2010, 08:09 PM
I detest remakes, both on principle and because they generally suck rocks.

My only exception is Mel Brooks' remake of To Be or Not To Be. (Since the original was a Bob Hope vehicle, that's horror enough for me to inject it into this thread. :tongue)

shawkins
11-04-2010, 08:09 PM
The Dawn remake was more or less everything I don't like about remakes.

Such as? Just curious.


I don't think the setting would have helped to change that for me. Mind you, the mall was just about the only issue it had in common with the first - if I remember correctly.

Pretty much. Ving Rhames and Ken Foree both played badass cops, but that and the mall were pretty much it.

By the way, I met Ken Foree once. I never quite got just how effing HUGE he is from watching DotD. (He's also super nice). I'm not small and when we shook hands my hand got lost. But in the Halloween remake, Tyler Mane dwarfed him in both height and bulk. I can't even imagine. Mane must have his own zip code.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:11 PM
See this is why I could never be a mod.

:ROFL:

If mods had the power to ban everyone we disagreed with, this forum would be a very, very lonely place...

shawkins
11-04-2010, 08:15 PM
I detest remakes, both on principle and because they generally suck rocks.

I agree with the principle, but I've seen enough good ones that I'm prepared to give them a chance.

Occasionally the remake turns out better, IMO. For instance, I like the 1986 Fly a lot better than the Vincent Price one. And I thought The Omega Man was quite a bit better than The Last Man on Earth. The '80s Thing did a lot more for me than the '50s one (though I like it as well).

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 08:15 PM
:ROFL:

If mods had the power to ban everyone we disagreed with, this forum would be a very, very lonely place...I wouldn't ban everyone who disagreed with me. But there would be a set of trigger words.
"I liked the remake of Dawn"
"Fast Zombies are better than Slow"
"I can't wait for the new Ben Stiller film"

That sort of thing.

Jcomp
11-04-2010, 08:15 PM
I didn't hate the Dawn remake, but it didn't really stick with me either. I don't mind remakes so long as there's a purpose behind it. For instance, with The Ring, I don't think the mythology and vibe of the Japanese film would have translated well directly to an American audience who doesn't have at least a casual interest in Japanese culture. So it made sense that they remake it for the States. Something like the shot-for-shot Psycho remake, conversely, is just so utterly unnecessary (and miscast) it's indefensible.

seun
11-04-2010, 08:16 PM
Such as? Just curious.


Forgettable characters, predictable script, very few actual scares, no atmosphere, clumsily directed (great way to end a film - show the credits while stuff is still going on. Yes, I know Romero did similar in Night, but he presented it in still images, not action) and ultimately two hours of style over substance. Not to mention the sex scene thrown in for no good reason.

I didn't like it. ;)

Bmwhtly
11-04-2010, 08:16 PM
I agree with the principle, but I've seen enough good ones that I'm prepared to give them a chance.

Occasionally the remake turns out better, IMO. For instance, I like the 1986 Fly a lot better than the Vincent Price one. And I thought The Omega Man was quite a bit better than The Last Man on Earth. The '80s Thing did a lot more for me than the '50s one (though I like it as well).The Humphrey Bogart 'The Maltese Falcon' was apparently a remake.
They can do good.

seun
11-04-2010, 08:17 PM
The '80s Thing did a lot more for me than the '50s one (though I like it as well).

I can agree with that. Both films are great in their own ways.

Jcomp
11-04-2010, 08:19 PM
"Fast Zombies are better than Slow"


But... but... it's true though.

I know it's practically blasphemy, but I've never found Romero style zombies to be scary. Even in stories that employ slow zombies to great effect (I love the World War Z novel, for instance) the whole "plodding zombie menace" fails to frighten me. You can always just outrun them. Part of it also might be that live in Texas, so I can order a handgun and box of bullets with my combo meal at Whataburger. If a zombie outbreak happened here it'd be squashed in record time. Either that or someone would get the idea to wrangle them up to be released on a private hunting preserve.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:20 PM
"I can't wait for the new Ben Stiller film"



I could get behind banning people for saying that. :evil

brainstorm77
11-04-2010, 08:21 PM
If you want a good chuckle, watch the Day remake. Yup, it really was that bad.

dgrintalis
11-04-2010, 08:23 PM
The 70s, hands down. The Omen, The Exorcist, Halloween. 'Nuff said. :D

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:24 PM
But... but... it's true though.

I know it's practically blasphemy, but I've never found Romero style zombies to be scary. Even in stories that employ slow zombies to great effect (I love the World War Z novel, for instance) the whole "plodding zombie menace" fails to frighten me. You can always just outrun them. Part of it also might be that live in Texas, so I can order a handgun and box of bullets with my combo meal at Whataburger. If a zombie outbreak happened here it'd be squashed in record time. Either that or someone would get the idea to wrangle them up to be released on a private hunting preserve.

Thank you!

Logically, I understand why slow, plodding zombies make more sense. I mean, they are rotting dead people. But if you can outrun them, how are they as scary as the zombie that's hot on your heels (and trying to take a bite out)?

I suppose we all have our own psychological triggers, but being chased by something that's as fast as, or faster than, me is a lot scarier than something trudging along like a drunk snail.

shawkins
11-04-2010, 08:24 PM
Forgettable characters, predictable script, very few actual scares, no atmosphere, clumsily directed (great way to end a film - show the credits while stuff is still going on. Yes, I know Romero did similar in Night, but he presented it in still images, not action) and ultimately two hours of style over substance. Not to mention the sex scene thrown in for no good reason.

I didn't like it. ;)

Fair enough. I've got a thing for Sarah Polley and another thing for nihilism, so I was prepared to overlook a lot. I *loved* the soundtrack in the remake, and I had a good time picking out the in-jokes and nods to the original.

It also turned me on to James Gunn (Slither, Scooby-Doo, the upcoming Super) who I think is hysterical.

seun
11-04-2010, 08:25 PM
I know it's practically blasphemy, but I've never found Romero style zombies to be scary. Even in stories that employ slow zombies to great effect (I love the World War Z novel, for instance) the whole "plodding zombie menace" fails to frighten me. You can always just outrun them. .

They frighten me because you know they'll just keep coming. And with them being so slow, yes, you can outrun them, but you're going to get tired and run out of breath. They won't. They'll just keep coming and coming. And while they're coming, there are more coming at you from another direction.

Plus being in the UK, my most readily available lethal weapon is probably...well, a dvd of Lethal Weapon.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:26 PM
It also turned me on to James Gunn (Slither, Scooby-Doo, the upcoming Super) who I think is hysterical.

It turned me on to Jake Weber. *drool*

:tongue

brainstorm77
11-04-2010, 08:29 PM
As for zombie(huge fan), I'm loving The Walking Dead. :)

Haggis
11-04-2010, 08:30 PM
See this is why I could never be a mod.


:ROFL:

If mods had the power to ban everyone we disagreed with, this forum would be a very, very lonely place...
Chaos will be leaving us now. :e2teeth:










:D

seun
11-04-2010, 08:32 PM
By the way, I met Ken Foree once. I never quite got just how effing HUGE he is from watching DotD. (He's also super nice). I'm not small and when we shook hands my hand got lost.

I love the scene in the original Dawn when Peter and Roger are driving the trucks. Their banter about their difference in height is great.

shawkins
11-04-2010, 08:38 PM
But... but... it's true though.


But if you can outrun them, how are they as scary as the zombie that's hot on your heels (and trying to take a bite out)?

For real. I was just never brave enough to say it in public.

To me that sequence in the remake where Sarah Polley was scrambling out of the bathroom window and escaping the neighborhood was a breath of fresh air. By 2004 the shambling zombie thing was getting a little stale.

It was funny, too--remember when her hubby was chasing the car and he just peeled off and landed on the neigbor guy who was standing around wondering WTF? The first time I saw that I rotflmao.



They frighten me because you know they'll just keep coming. And with them being so slow, yes, you can outrun them, but you're going to get tired and run out of breath. They won't. They'll just keep coming and coming. And while they're coming, there are more coming at you from another direction.

I get the slow but relentless zombie thing as well. They'll just keep coming until they wear you down. That bit in DotD (orignal) where they're hot wiring the truck was amazing. You knew somebody was going to screw up, but Romero kept you waiting on the edge of your seat for, what? 10 minutes? Beautiful.

ETA: cross-posted.

ChaosTitan
11-04-2010, 08:40 PM
Chaos will be leaving us now. :e2teeth:



:e2cry:

shawkins
11-04-2010, 08:47 PM
Mildly off-topic: Anybody seen Dead Set? The BBC thing about the big brother house meets zombies? I tivo'd it on general principles, but I've got no idea if it's worth watching.

seun
11-04-2010, 08:57 PM
Mildly off-topic: Anybody seen Dead Set? The BBC thing about the big brother house meets zombies? I tivo'd it on general principles, but I've got no idea if it's worth watching.

Depends. I was disappointed because the writer (Charlie Brooker) is a genius while Dead Set was basically a lift from a load of zombie films with naff all social commentary. Still, it's always fun seeing Big Brother contestants being killed.

Incidentally, it wasn't a BBC production. Originally, it was broadcast on E4 which is connected to Channel 4.

brainstorm77
11-04-2010, 09:30 PM
Mildly off-topic: Anybody seen Dead Set? The BBC thing about the big brother house meets zombies? I tivo'd it on general principles, but I've got no idea if it's worth watching.

I thought it was worth watching.

Calla Lily
11-04-2010, 09:42 PM
*whaps Haggis on the nose with The New York Times*

*hides Chaos*

Haggis
11-04-2010, 10:22 PM
*adds the Lily to the list*

:mob

Celia Cyanide
11-04-2010, 10:33 PM
I said the 2000's. My second choice would be the 70's. I love foreign and indie horror, though, so I think I will go with the 2000's. What I think is funny is that Asian horror is considered all hip and atmospheric now, but back in the 80's Japan churned out crap that was supergross and weird, and made SAW look the original DRACULA.

Calla Lily
11-04-2010, 10:34 PM
*calls up her army of trained, angry ex-nuns with their Enhanced Rulers*

:mob:mob:mob

EFCollins
11-04-2010, 11:35 PM
The 70s, hands down. The Omen, The Exorcist, Halloween. 'Nuff said. :D

I'm just QFTing here. This truly is 'nuff said.

/lock thread

Haggis
11-05-2010, 12:00 AM
To all you people who don't think the 50s were the best era, let me ask you, did you have Attack of the Slime People in your decade? I think not.

http://roberthood.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/slimepeople-poster.jpg

clockwork
11-05-2010, 02:20 AM
70s for me. The Exorcist, The Omen, Dawn of the Dead, Don't Look Now, Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Add in some firm childhood faves like The Amityville Horror, Asylum, The Crazies, Last House on the Left, Phantasm (yes, Phantasm), cheat in The Shining (1980) and Jaws (because it scared the shit out of me) and the 70s is a lock for me.

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 12:45 PM
I know it's practically blasphemy, but I've never found Romero style zombies to be scary.


I've got no idea if it's worth watching.It is.


I was disappointed because the writer (Charlie Brooker) is a geniusOK, that settles it. I wasn't sure whether to link to this again. But, since the fast/slow debate and Dead Set have come up, I shall.


When Dead Set came out, there was a bit of an argument between Simon, Shaun of the Pegg and Charlie Brooker about the merits of fast and slow zombies.

Shaun of the Pegg started it with a review of Dead Set for the Guardian (http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/nov/04/television-simon-pegg-dead-set).
Charlie Brooker used half of his weekly column to respond (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/nov/10/barack-obama-zombies-running).


Dead Set was basically a lift from a load of zombie films with naff all social commentary.I would say it's a bit more than a straight lift.
I'd also say there are bits of social commentary. And plenty of comment on the merits of Big Brother.

seun
11-05-2010, 02:25 PM
I would say it's a bit more than a straight lift.
I'd also say there are bits of social commentary. And plenty of comment on the merits of Big Brother.

We'll have to agree to disagree, me old fruit. I thought it was a wasted opportunity to really say something about our obsession with reality TV and pointless celebrities, as well an opportunity for some entertaining zombie action. It failed on both counts for me.

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 02:36 PM
I fail to agree.

seun
11-05-2010, 02:50 PM
Have you come here for an argument?

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 02:55 PM
Who? Me? Certainly not. We fail to agree.

But we can agree that this may be the best thread in some considerable time :D

seun
11-05-2010, 02:57 PM
Who? Me? Certainly not. We fail to agree.

But we can agree that this may be the best thread in some considerable time :D

Damn it. I wanted this to turn into a Monty Python sketch.

And yes, this is a good thread.

ETA: I just checked the results. Surprised to see the 80s ahead of the 70s.

Calla Lily
11-05-2010, 03:54 PM
Because of this thread, I re-watched the original Night of the Living Dead last night.

It's better than I remembered.

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 05:04 PM
ETA: I just checked the results. Surprised to see the 80s ahead of the 70s.Day of the Dead + The Thing = Win :P

seun
11-05-2010, 05:22 PM
Day of the Dead + The Thing = Win :P

It's funny. I love those two (and generally prefer Day to Dawn) but I go with Crazies + TCM = Win.

Noah Body
11-05-2010, 05:25 PM
I was caught between the 1970s and 1980s, but went with the latter. Of course, more horror flicks were being routinely released in the 1930s and 1940s, especially by Universal, but it wasn't until the 1970s at the earliest that they became box office winners, most likely due to the hullabaloo surrounding The Exorcist.

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 05:27 PM
It's funny. I love those two (and generally prefer Day to Dawn) but I go with Crazies + TCM = Win.

However, the people have spoken.
The results are rather close, so the people have spoken in a wookie puke-yawn of confusion all over the poll.

By the by, have you (or anyone else) seen the remake of The Crazies? And is it any good?

seun
11-05-2010, 05:33 PM
However, the people have spoken.
The results are rather close, so the people have spoken in a wookie puke-yawn of confusion all over the poll.

By the by, have you (or anyone else) seen the remake of The Crazies? And is it any good?

The remake is OK. I gave it three out of five on Amazon mainly because of an ending we've seen many times before. It's not at all frightening but it's entertaining enough for a Friday night.

While we're on the subject, anyone seen this?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Horde-DVD-Antoine-Oppenheim/dp/B003TFUJPO/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

seun
11-05-2010, 05:34 PM
but it wasn't until the 1970s at the earliest that they became box office winners, most likely due to the hullabaloo surrounding The Exorcist.

Don't forget The Omen.

Bmwhtly
11-05-2010, 05:54 PM
While we're on the subject, anyone seen this?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Horde-DVD-Antoine-Oppenheim/dp/B003TFUJPO/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top
I haven't. It looks rather too style-over-substance to me.

Noah Body
11-05-2010, 05:59 PM
Don't forget The Omen.

The Omen checked in in 1976; The Exorcist in 1973. I doubt it could be proven, but Seltzer probably would have had a tougher time getting The Omen off the deck if The Exorcist hadn't rolled into the top 10 of the era.

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
11-05-2010, 06:02 PM
I said the 1960s.

I love the classic nature of those years. Not only did you have the original NOTLD (which is still difficult for me to watch all the way through!), you also have Vincent PRICE in all the cool Edgar Allan Poe stuff (The Abominable Dr. Phibes and Theater of Blood JUST missed being in the 60s, so it was difficult for me...). Also Roger Corman, by association, with and without Vince.

And don't forget Barbara ("My eyes really ARE on opposite sides of my head") Steele stuff like Black Sunday. When they first put that spiky helmet on her, I squealed.

seun
11-05-2010, 06:18 PM
I haven't. It looks rather too style-over-substance to me.

Yeah, that was my worry although I did wonder if it might be fun in a Shoot Em Up sort of way.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 07:32 PM
I'm surrounded by phillistines.

Just take those old movies off the shelf.
I'll sit and watch Lugosi by myself.
Today's movies ain't got the same chills.
I like those old time horror films.

Don't try to show me Jason, Freddy or Blair.
You'll never get sitting in that chair.
Today's movies ain't got the same chills.
I like those old time horror films.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 07:33 PM
The Keanu Reeves version was better.

...legs it from thread...

Blasphemy!

Calla Lily
11-05-2010, 07:36 PM
Lugosi and Karloff: The Black Cat. Love all of it, especially Karloff's Latin "Satanic chant" that sounds like a recipe, as it begins "with a grain of salt". :D (My Latin has deteriorated over the years, but I do understand some things.)

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 07:40 PM
My only exception is Mel Brooks' remake of To Be or Not To Be. (Since the original was a Bob Hope vehicle, that's horror enough for me to inject it into this thread. :tongue)

Not Bob Hope. Jack Benny. Hope did the 1939 remake of The Cat and the Canary, and the 1940 Ghost Breakers. Both are pretty good horror comedies, although I prefer the silent Cat.

No listing for the 10s/20s? No Phantom, Golem, Caligari, Nosferatu? No Lon Chaney? Phillistines.

shawkins
11-05-2010, 07:45 PM
No listing for the 10s/20s? No Phantom, Golem, Caligari, Nosferatu? No Lon Chaney? Phillistines.

I won't bother denying it. I love the 1932 Mummy though. Does that help?

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 07:45 PM
Occasionally the remake turns out better, IMO. For instance, I like the 1986 Fly a lot better than the Vincent Price one. And I thought The Omega Man was quite a bit better than The Last Man on Earth. The '80s Thing did a lot more for me than the '50s one (though I like it as well).

Can't disagree too much, although The Omega Man wasn't anything to write home about, either. And the second Thing wasn't really a remake, as the first one had so little relation to the source material. The 80s version was much closer to Campbell's yarn.

One more remake I preferred to the original was 13 Ghosts, since the first one was probably William Castle's worst film.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 07:48 PM
The Humphrey Bogart 'The Maltese Falcon' was apparently a remake.
They can do good.

It was the second remake in ten years. The first remake, Satan Met a Lady, is probably Bette Davis' worst film. Avoid it at all costs. The 1931 original isn't too bad, except in comparison to the Bogie version.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:02 PM
To all you people who don't think the 50s were the best era, let me ask you, did you have Attack of the Slime People in your decade? I think not.

Uh, no. But, it DID have Them!, Ray Harryhausen's best work, The Creature From the Black Lagoon (which I've seen twice in its original 3-D, an experience I highly recommend) and the bestest of the bestest, Curse of the Demon (AKA Night of the Demon). But that small number just doesn't stack up against The Old Dark House, The Black Cat, Bride of Frankenstein, Daughter of Dracula, The Invisible Ray, Val Lewton's run at RKO in the early 40s (regardless of Carpenter's opinion of Lewton's ouevre), or all the other great films of that era. Even pathetic little poverty row studio PRC came up with a minor classic in Bluebeard, a better horror film than almost anything made in the last couple of decades by any reasonable objective standard. And leave us not forget, the only actor to win an Oscar for playing a monster was Fredric March in 1932 for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and deservedly so. (Jeff Goldblum should have at least been nominated in '86 for The Fly, BTW) A-list actors haven't stooped to making real horror films in a long time, but it was a fairly regular thing in the 20s and 30s.

Noah Body
11-05-2010, 08:05 PM
The Invisible Ray! Yes, I'd forgotten about that one!

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:09 PM
I was caught between the 1970s and 1980s, but went with the latter. Of course, more horror flicks were being routinely released in the 1930s and 1940s, especially by Universal, but it wasn't until the 1970s at the earliest that they became box office winners, most likely due to the hullabaloo surrounding The Exorcist.

Uh, no, quite a few of the 30s Universals were huge box office smashes, as were RKO's King Kong in 1933, MGM's Jekyll & Hyde, and several others.

Noah Body
11-05-2010, 08:11 PM
Sure they were, but not enough to make the majors commit funds to make them A-list projects. After the 1970s (and certainly the 1980s) horror films could be considered tent poles in some seasons.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:13 PM
I said the 1960s.

I love the classic nature of those years. Not only did you have the original NOTLD (which is still difficult for me to watch all the way through!), you also have Vincent PRICE in all the cool Edgar Allan Poe stuff (The Abominable Dr. Phibes and Theater of Blood JUST missed being in the 60s, so it was difficult for me...). Also Roger Corman, by association, with and without Vince.

And don't forget Barbara ("My eyes really ARE on opposite sides of my head") Steele stuff like Black Sunday. When they first put that spiky helmet on her, I squealed.

You make a good case for your decade, which would be my second choice. Lots of other great films in the 60s - Black Sabbath, Dr. Terror's House of Horrors and the other Amicus portmanteau films, and several Hammer films, before they got too cheesy.

Edited to add Psycho, its poor cousin Homicidal, Les Yieux Sans Visage and Karloff's last great film, Targets.

Still, given the choice of watching zombies in NOTLD or Lewton's I Walked With a Zombie, I'll take the Lewton every time.

BTW, the first zombie movie to be nominated for an Oscar was Monogram's admittedly pretty cheesy King of the Zombies, believe it or not. It got the 1941 nomination for best score.

Haggis
11-05-2010, 08:17 PM
I love the older stuff, SirOtter, but the 50s had the best ever horror flick, and I'll bet it's one you remember. Check it out here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2kdpAGDu8s).

50s horror movies were all about the cold war anyhow. This one was just a little less subtle about it.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:28 PM
I love the older stuff, SirOtter, but the 50s had the best ever horror flick, and I'll bet it's one you remember. Check it out here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2kdpAGDu8s).

50s horror movies were all about the cold war anyhow. This one was just a little less subtle about it.

LOL Yes, I do remember that one, although I saw it in the 60s. The 50s also had the original version of The Blob, and the great French film, Diabolique. Both have been remade, badly. I'd still rather watch Island of Lost Souls or Curse of the Cat People.

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:31 PM
Sure they were, but not enough to make the majors commit funds to make them A-list projects. After the 1970s (and certainly the 1980s) horror films could be considered tent poles in some seasons.

They also didn't have to contend with the Hays Office, or persnickety British censors ready to slap an X certificate on anything scarier than Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. Not that that's an excuse, but I'm just sayin'.
;)

Noah Body
11-05-2010, 08:42 PM
:D

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 08:50 PM
I won't bother denying it. I love the 1932 Mummy though. Does that help?

Plenty. :D

Hip-Hop-a-potamus
11-05-2010, 08:54 PM
You make a good case for your decade, which would be my second choice. Lots of other great films in the 60s - Black Sabbath, Dr. Terror's House of Horrors and the other Amicus portmanteau films, and several Hammer films, before they got too cheesy.

Edited to add Psycho, its poor cousin Homicidal, Les Yieux Sans Visage and Karloff's last great film, Targets.

Still, given the choice of watching zombies in NOTLD or Lewton's I Walked With a Zombie, I'll take the Lewton every time.

BTW, the first zombie movie to be nominated for an Oscar was Monogram's admittedly pretty cheesy King of the Zombies, believe it or not. It got the 1941 nomination for best score.

Point taken. Lewton is creepy.

Ooh! And another in my 60s pantheon, how can I forget the creepily disturbing Eyes Without a Face?

SirOtter
11-05-2010, 09:22 PM
Point taken. Lewton is creepy.

Ooh! And another in my 60s pantheon, how can I forget the creepily disturbing Eyes Without a Face?

Also consider Night of the Eagle, AKA Burn, Witch, Burn. It was a rare improved remake over the original, Weird Woman. Both were based on Fritz Leiber's novel, Conjure Wife, and while both are enjoyable, the remake is a much better film.

Bmwhtly
11-08-2010, 01:32 PM
As if to prove my point about the 80's, the BBC showed Day of the Dead over the weekend.

It's at least as outstanding as I remember.

seun
11-08-2010, 03:11 PM
As if to prove my point about the 80's, the BBC showed Day of the Dead over the weekend.

It's at least as outstanding as I remember.

Why was I not informed this was on TV? OK, I could have watched the dvd but my point still stands.

Bmwhtly
11-08-2010, 03:59 PM
Why was I not informed this was on TV? OK, I could have watched the dvd but my point still stands.Yes, I did wonder if I was an idiot for staying up till 2 in the morning to watch it rather than watch the DVD the next morning.

But perhaps sleep-deprivation heightens the experience?

seun
11-08-2010, 05:00 PM
I'm running this monkey farm now, Frankenstein. :evil

Bmwhtly
11-09-2010, 03:19 PM
In other news, I've found a good 90's horror film!

One film obviously can't redeem that decade, but we forgot about...

...

Candyman!

seun
11-09-2010, 05:21 PM
In other news, I've found a good 90's horror film!

One film obviously can't redeem that decade, but we forgot about...

...

Candyman!

Agreed. A great film.

Dodge
11-10-2010, 11:23 PM
I really enjoyed horror movies, especially the monster movies of the 50's and 60's like Jason and the Argonauts, The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, Invasion of the Body Snatchers... but what scared me was The Exorcist, Alien, and the remake of The Thing.

RayC
07-21-2011, 06:03 PM
Definitely 70's. They were just so gritty and raw. You watch them and you finish feeling dirty. Last House on the left, TCM, Jaws, exorcist. All leave you feeling like you just went through the movie. no doubt that for me its the 70's. A close second though would be 30's...Hitchcock was a genius!

RayC
07-21-2011, 06:04 PM
I meant 60's for hitchcock, not 30's. lol.