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JRTurner
10-14-2010, 11:00 PM
Quake is the young adult imprint of Echelon Press. The submission guidelines are here:
http://quakeme.com/submissions/

Catadmin
10-15-2010, 02:58 PM
Wow. This almost sounded interesting until I read this:

"All queries MUST include a detailed Marketing Strategy. This report must be sent as an attachment. Queries that do not include a Marketing Strategy will be deleted without consideration. It is important for authors submitting to Quake to know that a strong marketing strategy is just as important to us as the book itself."

Do you require this of your print authors? If not, why require it of your e-book authors?

Do you even have an in-house marketing department?

Also, neither your post or guidelines say anything about rates. If this is not a paying market, this was a poor place to post this notification. If it is a paying market, please read the guidelines of this forum and post the relevant details.

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 03:26 PM
Yes, the marketing strategy is required of everyone. This is becoming common in the industry. Please research other similar independent, reputable houses. You'll find this is not unusual.

We have an in-house publicist. I'm not sure how many independent publishing houses have marketing departments. I know Quake (an imprint of Echelon) has a better reputation for promoting it's authors than many.

This is a paying market and for e-book the rate is 50%.

Thank you for your questions.

MumblingSage
10-15-2010, 06:42 PM
Yes, the marketing strategy is required of everyone. This is becoming common in the industry. Please research other similar independent, reputable houses. You'll find this is not unusual.

Not unusual, perhaps, but it's not usual either. When it comes up here it's something that makes people notice, especially because, as Catadmin said, it raises questions about what kind of promotion and marketing will be done in-house.

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 06:48 PM
Not unusual, perhaps, but it's not usual either. When it comes up here it's something that makes people notice, especially because, as Catadmin said, it raises questions about what kind of promotion and marketing will be done in-house.

I'ts uncommon to find ANY house that does marketing and promotion for new authors. That's just the harsh reality of the publishing world today. If anything, consider creating a marketing strategy good practice for the career author.

MartinD
10-15-2010, 07:01 PM
Thanks for the post, JRTurner. I haven't found much of a market for YA novels so Quake is interesting to me.

I've not heard of Quake books before. Is the in-house publicist new to the company? What kind of publicizing is the company doing?

KimJo
10-15-2010, 07:12 PM
On the subject of marketing plans (and possibly off-topic, so mods, delete if this isn't appropriate...)

I'm published in the romance genre with Pink Petal Books, and most of my YA stuff is with Jupiter Gardens Press, which are separate imprints of a single company. For my first romance submission to them and my first YA sub, I was asked to include a marketing/promo plan. That didn't mean that the publisher expected me to do all the marketing/promo myself; far from it. They do quite a bit as well, and have just expanded their marketing department. What they wanted from me was an idea of what I was willing to do to *help them* promote my work. Stuff like whether I had a website, whether I planned to do any online or in-person interviews, that sort of thing. I was also given information about the marketing/promo things the publisher does.

I would agree that a company that expects the author to do all the marketing work themselves might be red-flag-worthy, but for me personally, a request for a marketing plan wouldn't necessarily turn me off a publisher unless I see indications that they don't plan on doing any marketing themselves.

However, I respectfully disagree that it's rare to find a publisher that does marketing and promotion for new authors. If publishers don't contribute to marketing for ALL their authors, regardless of whether the author is new or a veteran, how will they make any sales?

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 07:18 PM
Thanks for the post, JRTurner. I haven't found much of a market for YA novels so Quake is interesting to me.

I've not heard of Quake books before. Is the in-house publicist new to the company? What kind of publicizing is the company doing?

The in-house publicist has been there since the beginning of the year. I know she worked with D.M. Anderson and his Killer Cows release (I was his editor, so I'm a bit more familiar with the history of that publication.)

I do know that Echelon works to promote all their authors at many of the trade exhibits such as Printers Row, Love is Murder, and Bouchercon. There are other things they do as well, such as advertisements that are free to the author in targeted catalogs, etc. I recall they recently ran a full page ad for their mystery authors in Crimespree magazine. Things of that nature. This isn't really my department, but I can say without pause that they do at least as much, if not more than, comparable houses.

Hope that answers your question. :)

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 07:22 PM
However, I respectfully disagree that it's rare to find a publisher that does marketing and promotion for new authors. If publishers don't contribute to marketing for ALL their authors, regardless of whether the author is new or a veteran, how will they make any sales?

My apologies if I wasn't clear (and it looks as if I wasn't.) I should have stated that it's rare to find a publisher who doesn't expect an author to do the bulk of their own promotion and marketing.

In other words, the publishing houses no longer set up book signing tours and pay the costs of those tours. Publishing houses no longer create websites for their authors and employ a host of people to filter the mail/email that goes to those authors. Those days are long gone.

I hope that's more clear. Again, I apologize.

hester
10-15-2010, 08:04 PM
Hi JR! Just had a question about the submission guidelines-

Does the marketing plan have to be provided with the initial query? I wasn't sure if it had to be provided initially or later (ie, with a manuscript submission).

Thanks! My brain's already switched to weekend mode :).

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 08:15 PM
Hi JR! Just had a question about the submission guidelines-

Does the marketing plan have to be provided with the initial query? I wasn't sure if it had to be provided initially or later (ie, with a manuscript submission).

Thanks! My brain's already switched to weekend mode :).

Not with the initial query, no. As of this moment, the website is being fixed to reflect that inaccuracy. (It was supposed to say "submissions" not "queries"--we just caught the mix-up because of the exchanges here--so thank you everyone!)

Just a little background history on me:

I worked freelance as an editor for years. When my publisher (Echelon) had an editor quit very abruptly because of a family crisis, I stepped in to help out. Recently, the head of the Quake division stepped aside and I was offered the position. This is my third week as head of the YA line and I'm still ironing out a few minor wrinkles.

So--keep the questions coming and I'll answer as best as I possibly can. ;)

Warmly,
Jenny:)

hester
10-15-2010, 08:23 PM
Thanks, JR! And congrats on your new position! :)

JRTurner
10-15-2010, 08:43 PM
Thanks, hester :D

blu
10-15-2010, 11:16 PM
JRTurner, first allow me to say congrats on the new position. It's wonderful to be working in an area you obviously enjoy. Secondly, when I went to the site and read through the guidelines I was very excited. You're looking for exactly the type of book I am currently writing. How fast do you think your 2011 quota will fill up? I have been published before, but I am very dissatisfied with the publisher and will not be returning to them in the future. My last inquiry, is it as difficult as it sounds to be transferred to a print copy from the e-book? I can see my story working as an e-book with some adjustments but it would be much better suited for hard copy as it has some marketing items that go with it.

KTC
10-15-2010, 11:21 PM
I thought this publisher looked suitable enough for me to submit to. And I did. I see nothing wrong with providing a marketing plan. I have no wishes to sit on my hands once my novel comes out. I DO have a plan...even if I'm not asked for it by every publisher I submit to...so I have no qualms with sending a marketing plan to a publisher. I've been submitting a lot lately, and this really isn't that rare a request. Alas, my book was accepted elsewhere. But I am considering submitting another manuscript here. Just wanted to put my two cents in regarding marketing plan issue.

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 12:12 AM
JRTurner, first allow me to say congrats on the new position. It's wonderful to be working in an area you obviously enjoy. Secondly, when I went to the site and read through the guidelines I was very excited. You're looking for exactly the type of book I am currently writing. How fast do you think your 2011 quota will fill up? I have been published before, but I am very dissatisfied with the publisher and will not be returning to them in the future. My last inquiry, is it as difficult as it sounds to be transferred to a print copy from the e-book? I can see my story working as an e-book with some adjustments but it would be much better suited for hard copy as it has some marketing items that go with it.

Our quota for 2011 is coming along nicely, but we still have some wiggle room. As far as the difficulty in transferring from print to electronic--there is no difficulty. In essence, what is published electronically is as carefully edited and packaged as if it were going to print. We maintain the highest quality possible, no matter what type of publication is used. Therefore when it does come time to transition from ebook to print, there's little that needs to be done.

I hope that answers your questions. :)

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 12:13 AM
I thought this publisher looked suitable enough for me to submit to. And I did. I see nothing wrong with providing a marketing plan. I have no wishes to sit on my hands once my novel comes out. I DO have a plan...even if I'm not asked for it by every publisher I submit to...so I have no qualms with sending a marketing plan to a publisher. I've been submitting a lot lately, and this really isn't that rare a request. Alas, my book was accepted elsewhere. But I am considering submitting another manuscript here. Just wanted to put my two cents in regarding marketing plan issue.

Thanks for the comment :) And we'd be happy to consider another manuscript if you choose to submit.

Warmly,
Jenny:)

KimJo
10-16-2010, 12:40 AM
My apologies if I wasn't clear (and it looks as if I wasn't.) I should have stated that it's rare to find a publisher who doesn't expect an author to do the bulk of their own promotion and marketing.

In other words, the publishing houses no longer set up book signing tours and pay the costs of those tours. Publishing houses no longer create websites for their authors and employ a host of people to filter the mail/email that goes to those authors. Those days are long gone.

I hope that's more clear. Again, I apologize.

No apology needed; I'm sorry I misunderstood your post. (Who were those two cartoon guys who always apologized to each other? Gaston and something? LOL) I now understand what you meant, and I do agree that some publishers have reduced both their marketing budgets and their share of setting up things like tours, etc. Some publishers do still set up websites and signing tours and that sort of thing, some collaborate with the authors on doing so, and some rely on the authors to set up their own stuff. Depends, I would expect, on the size of the publisher and the popularity of the author. However, authors are unquestionably expected to do some promoting.

The difference, which I expect is what sends up red flags for some, is on whether the publisher requires the author to *pay* to promote their book. Yog's Law: Money flows toward the author. If an author *chooses* to pay for promo (for example, I pay for website hosting and occasionally inexpensive postcards, magnets, etc.), so be it, but if the publisher *requires* it, that would definitely be a red flag. A publisher should never tell an author that the author has to pay for anything, be it printing the book or printing a bookmark.

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 01:06 AM
No apology needed; I'm sorry I misunderstood your post. (Who were those two cartoon guys who always apologized to each other? Gaston and something? LOL) I now understand what you meant, and I do agree that some publishers have reduced both their marketing budgets and their share of setting up things like tours, etc. Some publishers do still set up websites and signing tours and that sort of thing, some collaborate with the authors on doing so, and some rely on the authors to set up their own stuff. Depends, I would expect, on the size of the publisher and the popularity of the author. However, authors are unquestionably expected to do some promoting.

Oh, absolutely :) I agree. I'm sure there are things unknown authors do that would make veteran authors (who gained their fame in the 70s-90s) laugh or wince, or both. I guess it's all part of paying our dues in this new technological age. :)


The difference, which I expect is what sends up red flags for some, is on whether the publisher requires the author to *pay* to promote their book. Yog's Law: Money flows toward the author. If an author *chooses* to pay for promo (for example, I pay for website hosting and occasionally inexpensive postcards, magnets, etc.), so be it, but if the publisher *requires* it, that would definitely be a red flag. A publisher should never tell an author that the author has to pay for anything, be it printing the book or printing a bookmark.

Try to look at it from the perspective of the publishing house as well. They find a great story, a wonderfully written book they want to buy because they're passionate about that book. They invest in an editor to polish the work. They hire a cover artist to create an amazing package. They fork out the bucks for an ISBN, for copyright, for e-book conversion, etc. And then once the book comes out--the author disappears.

You wouldn't believe how often that happens.

The marketing plan is just that--a plan. If an author can establish a web presence without spending a dime (and there are thousands of ways to do that) then more power to them. If they can find ways to be paid for public events (and there are many) then that's awesome. If they want to invest in publicity materials, like bookmarks or postcards, to help grow their brand and their name, that's tax deductable--and if it gains them a single sale, then the money is still flowing to them.

Here's something you might find interesting. I contacted James Patterson's son to request some publicity materials. Nothing that would require an autograph, just some fun things for a giveaway promo I was doing. He told me that even James Patterson's publisher doesn't provide those things and because his father is so well known, they don't see any reason to invest in it themselves.

Unfortunately, for first-time authors, or those just establishing their career, these sort of marketing/promotional tools are often effective and necessary. I think it's perfectly reasonable for a publisher, about to invest money, time, and heart into a book and its author--to expect the author to do the same.

Just my opinion of course. I'm sure there are many that differ. Thank you, though, for your understanding :)

Warmly,
Jenny

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 01:12 AM
I should add here that neither Echelon or the imprint Quake expect any sort of payment for any sort of promotional materials. We should probably buy stock in a few of the places we personally use and recommend, but we don't get any kick backs or any perks for doing so. (Such as Vista Print's free business cards :) ) We simply offer opportunities, do our best to help authors find the most cost effective and successful avenues should the author ask as a way of offering our support.

So no--there is no money expected to be paid to Echelon or Quake--at any time--for any reason.

Hope that clarifies a little more ;)

MumblingSage
10-16-2010, 01:51 AM
I should add here that neither Echelon or the imprint Quake expect any sort of payment for any sort of promotional materials. We should probably buy stock in a few of the places we personally use and recommend, but we don't get any kick backs or any perks for doing so. (Such as Vista Print's free business cards :) ) We simply offer opportunities, do our best to help authors find the most cost effective and successful avenues should the author ask as a way of offering our support.

So no--there is no money expected to be paid to Echelon or Quake--at any time--for any reason.

Hope that clarifies a little more ;)

It does. And the fact that you have an in-house publicist shows the writer won't be expected to do all the marketing. Thanks for the clarifications!

PortableHal
10-16-2010, 05:40 AM
My wife and I worked briefly with Jenny (J.R. Turner). We found her to be a very good editor and a very nice person.

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 09:26 PM
Thanks so much for the kind words! :) Your Mars Needs Writers Blog-O-Rama is a great read. Y'all have such a wonderful sense of humor. I enjoyed working with you as well ;)

Warmly,
Jeny:)

Catadmin
10-16-2010, 10:25 PM
Thank you for the clarifications. I appreciate them.

JRTurner
10-16-2010, 10:33 PM
Thank you for the clarifications. I appreciate them.

Your welcome :) I'm glad they helped!

Kensington
10-17-2010, 06:12 AM
Wow, so many rules.

JRTurner
10-17-2010, 06:22 AM
Wow, so many rules.

They're comparable to many other houses:

Wild Rose Publishing (http://thewildrosepress.com/publisher/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=33&Itemid=44)
Samhain (http://samhainpublishing.com/submissions)
Whiskey Creek (http://whiskeycreekpress.com/submissions.shtml)
Medallion (http://www.medallionpress.com/guidlines/index.html)

Just to name a few ;)

thothguard51
10-17-2010, 06:29 AM
JR,

Do you mind if I ask what your professional editing experiences were before hooking up with Quake? I am always interested in where editors got their start...

JRTurner
10-17-2010, 06:45 AM
JR,

Do you mind if I ask what your professional editing experiences were before hooking up with Quake? I am always interested in where editors got their start...

Smooth, Nick :) I've already given them to you, but since you've asked so nicely...

I began as a mentor for Romance Writer's of America through their CLUES program. One of my first paid gigs was editing a newsletter for a non-fiction author. (Milli Thorton, Fear of Writing.) I opened my own critique service and have edited books for Jonathan Miller, a multi-published author and attorney, Killer Cows for D.M. Anderson, and at the moment, Unbinding the Stone by Marc Vun Cannon. There are a host of other books and smaller projects I've worked on--such as short stories and preparing queries and partials for aspiring authors. I'm currently the newsletter (a print publication) editor for Wisconsin Regional Writer's Association--an organization that has been in operation for over 60 years.

Personally, I am an award-winning author with seven published novels, six of them in print. My work has appeared in Woman's Day and in Dr. Phil's magazine. My articles have appeared on the 'net and in other publications as well. I've been at this for over a decade now, and listing all of them would take some time and thought.

Thank you for your interest (again.) :D

thothguard51
10-17-2010, 07:00 AM
I would say you are well qualified...

Thank you...

JRTurner
10-17-2010, 07:06 AM
I would say you are well qualified...

Thank you...

Your welcome, Nick.

I didn't know you were writing YA these days. Were you thinking of submitting? Fantasy does really well in the YA market.

KimJo
10-17-2010, 04:50 PM
JRTurner, thanks for taking time to answer questions here and clarify your posts. That's the sign of a true professional, IMO.

JRTurner
10-17-2010, 05:51 PM
JRTurner, thanks for taking time to answer questions here and clarify your posts. That's the sign of a true professional, IMO.

Thanks for the compliment, KimJo! :) If you think of anything else, just ask.

thothguard51
10-18-2010, 02:00 AM
Your welcome, Nick.

I didn't know you were writing YA these days. Were you thinking of submitting? Fantasy does really well in the YA market.

JR,

My work is more older teen or adult, but thank you for asking. I do admire many YA authors though.

JRTurner
11-01-2010, 05:02 PM
ECHELON:
Echelon is seeking submissions for ALL eBook divisions. Please visit our site for guidelines. http://echelonpress.com

EXPLORATIONS:
Echelon Explorations is seeking submissions for eBook publication. Guidelines at http://echelonexplorations.com

SHORTS:
Echelon Shorts is seeking submissions for eBook publication for all genres. Guidelines at http://echelonshorts.com
Deadline for Echelon Shorts Holiday submissions 11/10/10. Guidelines at http://echelonshorts.com

QUAKE:
Quake is seeking submissions for eBook publication for all genres. Guidelines at http://quakeme.com
Deadline for Quake Holiday Shorts submissions 11/10/10. Guidelines at http://quakeme.com

LMILLER111
11-07-2010, 05:30 PM
Anyone have any experience with Quake? I like to hear about the submissions process - a friend of mine mentioned that she thought you had to submit a bunch of stuff with your manuscript. Before they've even read your work. I'd be especially interested in hearing if anyone has received a revise and resubmit request.

frandavea
11-02-2011, 03:14 AM
My second YA novel, Shaken, is due out by Quake soon. They handled my first novel as well (Killer Cows). For the most part, I have enjoyed the experience for the publication of both books. Both J.R. Turner (Quake acquisitions editor) and Karen Syed (Echelon CEO) have been pretty cool to work with, especially with my second book. They have provided a lot of editorial feedback, while respecting my original vision of both books.

There is also a lot of support from fellow Quake/Echelon authors, all of whom do this because they love it, which has really helped during the promotional process. None of us may ever become rich, but I, for one, feel like my work is in good hands.

They produce great covers for both books and ebook shorts, and, while I’d admittedly like my books to appear in more brick and mortar stores, I have found them available at just about every online all over the place.

writerterri
11-02-2011, 10:33 PM
Why was JRTurner banned?