PDA

View Full Version : How Long Do I Have to Reply to a Request for Full?



WorkingRachel
10-12-2010, 12:57 AM
A few days ago I got detailed revision suggestions from an agent who had read my full. She didn't offer representation, but said she would like to see it again if I make the revisions, and since I liked her suggestions, I started working on them.

Yesterday I got a full request from another agent. I've already cut out some extraneous plot lines and I'm reluctant to send out my old draft since I think those plot lines were contributing to previous rejects, but the working draft isn't as "polished"--there may be a few references to old plot lines that I haven't caught yet, and some of the MC's motivations for certain actions are now a bit muddled.

I think if I had another week or so I could make it better--I won't finish the revisions in the next week, but I could definitely get further than I am right now. But I'm pretty sure I read (somewhere...) that you shouldn't take longer than a day or two to respond to a request for a full.

Do I:
1. Send out the original draft
2. Send out the current draft, hoping that I haven't left any major holes and that a few stray sentences won't sway the agent too much
3. Sit on the new request until I've made more progress

nicolane
10-12-2010, 01:26 AM
4. Respond to the request stating that you are currently making some revisions and will get the revised work over as soon as they are complete.

Hope that helps

Julie Worth
10-12-2010, 01:32 AM
A week should be fine. As far as they know, you might have been out of town. And it's just going to the bottom of the slush pile anyway.

WorkingRachel
10-12-2010, 01:40 AM
4. Respond to the request stating that you are currently making some revisions and will get the revised work over as soon as they are complete.

Hope that helps

Thanks, nicolane. I was concerned this might make it look like I've queried something incomplete...but I guess it's not uncommon to decide you need to do further revision during the submission process, so maybe it's okay?

WorkingRachel
10-12-2010, 02:12 AM
As far as they know, you might have been out of town. And it's just going to the bottom of the slush pile anyway.

True--I might be overthinking this!

Ryan_Sullivan
10-12-2010, 11:12 AM
Thanks, nicolane. I was concerned this might make it look like I've queried something incomplete...but I guess it's not uncommon to decide you need to do further revision during the submission process, so maybe it's okay?

I wouldn't do that. It WILL make you seem like you queried prematurely which is a bad thing. A week is probably the longest you want to take. It's about professionalism--it's not professional to keep somebody you've asked to look at your manuscript waiting after they said they would. Nor is it professional to ask them to do so before you're ready.

So, send what you've got as soon as you can.

Good luck!

Corinne Duyvis
10-12-2010, 12:46 PM
I think if you indicate that another agent gave you some suggestions that you're incorporating, it wouldn't look like you queried prematurely. Give them the option, maybe. "Would you like to see the current version, or would you be OK waiting for the revised version?"

That's what I'd do, anyhow.

cspradbery
10-12-2010, 03:15 PM
I think if you indicate that another agent gave you some suggestions that you're incorporating, it wouldn't look like you queried prematurely. Give them the option, maybe. "Would you like to see the current version, or would you be OK waiting for the revised version?"

That's what I'd do, anyhow.

This.

I always think honesty is the best policy. As long as you feel you have been doing the right thing, just tell the truth. It was the policy I stuck to while agent hunting and occasionally went against other's advice, but it worked out pretty well for me.

Good luck, and congratulations on your requests!

abctriplets
10-13-2010, 02:08 PM
Or, state it as "I'm making some revisions suggested by another agent who has shown interest in the manuscript..." That way they know it's a hot commodity :)

WorkingRachel
10-13-2010, 05:03 PM
Thanks, everyone! I really appreciate the advice. I think I'm going to clean up what I've got right now and send tonight, and tell her that I'm in the process of making revisions suggested by another agent. Realistically I don't think I'm going to make much progress in the next couple days and I'd rather get this request off so it's not nagging the back of my mind while I'm writing. What I send will still be better than what I had last week.

This is request #5 out of 40 or so queries so I'm getting hopeful that I may be repped by the time I finish my goal of 100 queries.

Jamesaritchie
10-13-2010, 11:15 PM
You have as long as you ask for. It's this simple. If you need a week, or need a month, just let the agent know you need the time. It is NOT a problem.

What, does anyone really believe an agent is going to say, "Damn, that sounded like a novel I could see, one we'd both make money from, but that S.O.B actually had the gall to ask for a few weeks before sendiong me the full. I'll show him. I'll pass and let some other agent make all that money."

Agents are usually very nice, completely understanding people, and no agent is going to get mad because you delay sending in a full. Just let the agent know how much time you need, and you'll get it.

But start looking for excuses, start lying, start trying to find ways around just being open and honest, and you really can screw up a deal.

Honesty really is always the best policy.

N. M. Hayden
10-14-2010, 01:14 AM
Honesty really is always the best policy.

Heresy! Burn the witch!

BrooklynLee
10-14-2010, 02:44 AM
I like the idea of saying that you were making some revisions and offering the opportunity to see the current draft or the revised one. I think most agents would say "send me the revised" and then not judge you for it. Certainly this is a different situation than someone querying a book that isn't finished, so you have nothing to fear from being honest. :)

WorkingRachel
10-14-2010, 03:38 AM
I just emailed her, asked if she'd like to look at current or revised (dunno if anyone would choose current knowing you're working on a revision, but I figure it's usually better to give a choice). Told her I thought I would have the revision ready in about a month. Hope I can do that; these are some pretty extensive revisions, but I better get used to writing to a deadline!

I really appreciate all the opinions--without this "collective brain" I probably would have just sent out the original draft and crossed my fingers (and god help me if she'd offered to rep the original draft after I'd revised).

Okay, must stop thinking about this...start working on revising... :)