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Diana Hignutt
10-06-2010, 04:57 PM
I love me some H.P. Lovecraft. I'm a big fan of his books and stories. I've only seen a couple of movies based on his work, and most of those kind of suck, with a few exceptions. From Beyond wasn't too bad. It's been a long time since I saw The Dunwich Horror, but I don't remember that being too good. Vincent Price in The Haunted Palace is fine, but not spectacular in that adaptation of The Strange Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

So, what should I be on the lookout for, as far as good Lovecraft adapations? I appreciate your input in advance. Thank you.

Shadow_Ferret
10-06-2010, 05:09 PM
My favorite is "The Call of Cthulhu" which came out in 2005. It's a SILENT black and white film. I think it's just a wonderful adaptation.

Calla Lily
10-06-2010, 05:14 PM
There aren't any. Srsly. HP's atmospheric psychological horror doesn't adapt well to the screen.

Dunwich Horror was a joke. I swear, it was only filmed so Sandra Dee could do a nude scene.

Corman convinced American International to let him film a Lovecraft as a reward for all his successful (read: money-earning) Poe films. But when push came to shove, AI wouldn't take the risk, slapped the Poe poem over the credits, and marketed Haunted Palace as a Poe film. :mad: (We won't get into the adaptation errors, although I enjoy the FX, and Price + Chaney Jr. is a winning combination any time.)

The more recent adaptations--From Beyond, its sequel, and Reanimator --just make me angry. HP was never, ever about sex! And comedy doesn't mesh with HP's weirdness. IMNSHO.

The only one I enjoy is Die, Monster, Die. But that's because I love Karloff, and laugh at Nick Adams trying to act (he was his generation's Keanu Reeves, as far as range goes.) However, "The Colour Out of Space" is my favorite HP story, and DMD is more like a loosely based adaptation. Real loose.

My opinionated opinion.

Diana Hignutt
10-06-2010, 09:44 PM
My favorite is "The Call of Cthulhu" which came out in 2005. It's a SILENT black and white film. I think it's just a wonderful adaptation.

I shall obtain it. Thanks!

Diana Hignutt
10-06-2010, 09:46 PM
There aren't any. Srsly. HP's atmospheric psychological horror doesn't adapt well to the screen.

Dunwich Horror was a joke. I swear, it was only filmed so Sandra Dee could do a nude scene.

Corman convinced American International to let him film a Lovecraft as a reward for all his successful (read: money-earning) Poe films. But when push came to shove, AI wouldn't take the risk, slapped the Poe poem over the credits, and marketed Haunted Palace as a Poe film. :mad: (We won't get into the adaptation errors, although I enjoy the FX, and Price + Chaney Jr. is a winning combination any time.)

The more recent adaptations--From Beyond, its sequel, and Reanimator --just make me angry. HP was never, ever about sex! And comedy doesn't mesh with HP's weirdness. IMNSHO.

The only one I enjoy is Die, Monster, Die. But that's because I love Karloff, and laugh at Nick Adams trying to act (he was his generation's Keanu Reeves, as far as range goes.) However, "The Colour Out of Space" is my favorite HP story, and DMD is more like a loosely based adaptation. Real loose.

My opinionated opinion.

I will also check out DMD. I love "The Colour Out of Space". Thanks!

Anyone else?

Shadow_Ferret
10-06-2010, 09:49 PM
I shall obtain it. Thanks!

If you have Netflix, you can watch it instantly.

SirOtter
10-06-2010, 09:54 PM
My favorite is "The Call of Cthulhu" which came out in 2005. It's a SILENT black and white film. I think it's just a wonderful adaptation.

I agree wholeheartedly. It was a bit on the short side, though. I was enjoying it so much I was disappointed when it ended much too soon.

SirOtter
10-06-2010, 09:59 PM
But that's because I love Karloff, and laugh at Nick Adams trying to act (he was his generation's Keanu Reeves, as far as range goes.)

LOL! True, much too true. Nick was not a great thespian.

Karloff was the best.

shawkins
10-06-2010, 11:29 PM
Probably Guillermo del Toro's At The Mountains of Madness (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1118070/) (2013). :)

If you were OK with From Beyond and Reanimator, you might try Dagon. Ignore the title. Dagon is kinda-sorta The Shadow Over Innsmouth. It was by the same director and I thought it was the most effective of the three by a wide margin. There was a gratuitous last minute nude scene, IIRC, but the tone of Dagon isn't salacious to nearly the same extent that Stuart Gordon's previous two Lovecraft outings were.

I thought it was actually pretty damn good, considering the budget. I may watch it again tonight.

Jcomp
10-06-2010, 11:32 PM
Probably Guillermo del Toro's At The Mountains of Madness (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1118070/) (2013). :)


Beat me to it...

Calla Lily
10-06-2010, 11:36 PM
I forgot Dagon. Meh. Hardly any points of connection to the short story. Why change the location? Why why why the obsession with rewriting HP creatures as inter-species rapists? :rant:

At least the Dagon in Conan 2 just wanted to kill and eat everyone, like a good HP creature. :) (Ah-nuld, how we miss you on the screen.)

robeiae
10-06-2010, 11:55 PM
Titanic?

Calla Lily
10-07-2010, 01:38 AM
If Titanic had climaxed with Cthulhu rising from R'yleh to crush the ship and OM NOM NOM all the passengers, I would've been at the cinema opening night. With bells on. :tongue

shawkins
10-07-2010, 02:31 AM
I forgot Dagon. Meh. Hardly any points of connection to the short story.

No argument, but if we're calling Reanimator and From Beyond Lovecraft adaptations this one counts too. Anyway, I thought Dagon was surprisingly effective in its own way, much more so than the other two. I quite liked the (highlight for major spoiler) way the MC turned out to be a secret fish-guy and swam off into the happy-ever-after with the tentacle princess. I'm a sucker for dark love stories.


Why change the location?

Oooh! Oooh! I know this one! I read somewhere (or maybe saw on the DVD extras?) that it was dirt cheap to shoot in Spain. And the name of the town was innsmouth in Spanish. (inna morta?) I'm inclined to him a pass on this change, if not others.


Why why why the obsession with rewriting HP creatures as inter-species rapists? :rant:

I'm totally with you. I remember wincing the first time I saw that particular scene. "Stuart! WTF? You were doing so well!"


At least the Dagon in Conan 2 just wanted to kill and eat everyone, like a good HP creature. :) (Ah-nuld, how we miss you on the screen.)

Yeah, but Conan killed him by ripping out that big rhino horn he sprouted. I call subtext.

shawkins
10-07-2010, 02:44 AM
Oh, and also try John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness. It wasn't directly based on any Lovecraft story, but it's definitely Lovecraftian. PoD is my #1 favorite horror movie of all time, period.

robeiae
10-07-2010, 02:48 AM
Oh, and also try John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness. It wasn't directly based on any Lovecraft story, but it's definitely Lovecraftian. PoD is my #1 favorite horror movie of all time, period.
Crap. It's one of my favs, too. Double crap.

robeiae
10-07-2010, 02:49 AM
If Titanic had climaxed with Cthulhu rising from R'yleh to crush the ship and OM NOM NOM all the passengers, I would've been at the cinema opening night. With bells on. :tongue
When I watch Titanic, it ends with me picking up the TV and tossing it in a trash compactor...

Calla Lily
10-07-2010, 03:36 AM
Oh, and also try John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness. It wasn't directly based on any Lovecraft story, but it's definitely Lovecraftian. PoD is my #1 favorite horror movie of all time, period.


Crap. It's one of my favs, too. Double crap.

You mean there are other people who love this movie?! I've found my home at last! I've seen it so many times I've lost count. My favorite effect is the "dreams that are really messages from the future" sequences, but I love so much of the movie it's hard to choose my second favorite.

Camilla Delvalle
10-07-2010, 04:14 AM
Dagon, I just love that movie, and my friends love it too. It doesn't follow the short story exactly but there are some things with a good Lovecraft feeling, a happy end and good music. Setting it in Spain with spanish actors was a brilliant move.

The Call of Cthulu follows the short story but it didn't give me the same happy feelings.

Stephen King is very much inspired by Lovecraft. There is even a tv series called Nightmares and Dreamscapes (from Kings short stories I think) where Lovecraft deities are mentioned.

Diana Hignutt
10-07-2010, 02:21 PM
When I watch Titanic, it ends with me picking up the TV and tossing it in a trash compactor...

It ends with me shouting for Kate Winslet to scoot her fat ass over so Leo could climg up on the damn floating thing she was hoarding. And then I cry.

Diana Hignutt
10-07-2010, 02:22 PM
Awesome, I shall also check out Dagon and Prince of Darkness. Thanks guys!

shawkins
10-07-2010, 04:22 PM
You mean there are other people who love this movie?! I've found my home at last! I've seen it so many times I've lost count. My favorite effect is the "dreams that are really messages from the future" sequences, but I love so much of the movie it's hard to choose my second favorite.

It is the genius of John Carpenter that he can make a glass trash can filled with Palmolive seem scary.

robeiae
10-07-2010, 09:11 PM
I think, though, that I prefer Carpenter's The Thing (just barely). Nothing like watching that movie with the lights out and nobody around at two in the morning...

Calla Lily
10-08-2010, 01:10 AM
Carpenter's The Thing was very good and at least faithful to the original story. Although the delightful 50s version is full of WIN because Howard Hawks was a frickin' brilliant director (and the author did the screenplay, so ot can't be all bad. :)).

DavidZahir
10-08-2010, 02:10 AM
Dagon and Prince of Darkness are indeed good Lovecraftian films. Like others, I agree that the best is the silent Call of Cthulhu. The same group that did that one, btw, is now in post-production for The Whisperer in Darkness.

Haggis
10-08-2010, 02:24 AM
Wait. Sandra Dee did a nude scene?

shawkins
10-08-2010, 03:48 AM
I think, though, that I prefer Carpenter's The Thing (just barely). Nothing like watching that movie with the lights out and nobody around at two in the morning...

Ha! I knew if we kept this up long enough you would be WRONG!!! about something.

Nah, kidding. The Thing is awesome too. And, arguably, vaguely Lovecratftian. Did you hear some Swedish guy is making a prequel? Something about the Norwegian guys in the helicopter, IIRC. It's out next year. I'm not super optimistic, but it's gotten some good buzz.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-08-2010, 05:26 AM
Man, I loved Dagon, altho I admit to a slight crush on Ezra Godden, which might have helped (dweeby guys are Johnny's weakness).

And since this entry is skewing gay, let me point out one of the worst Lovecraft adaptions: http://www.fatally-yours.com/horror-reviews/cthulhu-2007/

Calla Lily
10-08-2010, 05:57 AM
Wait. Sandra Dee did a nude scene?

She did. Perhaps she was trying to break out of type. (It didn't work.) They closed the set and only let the director, cameraman, and Dean Stockwell in the room where she Bared All. Or most of All. I haven't watched the movie in awhile because it's dreck.

I never understood the reasoning: Tens of tousands of people will see her boobies 50X life-size on a screen, so why is that so different than having the cast and crew see 'em regular-size IRL?

(Lily's solution: Keep your clothes on. This movie was not improved by Ms. Dee's mammaires.)


Man, I loved Dagon, altho I admit to a slight crush on Ezra Godden, which might have helped (dweeby guys are Johnny's weakness).

And since this entry is skewing gay, let me point out one of the worst Lovecraft adaptions: http://www.fatally-yours.com/horror-reviews/cthulhu-2007/

:roll: Funny review! I'll pass on that movie, thank you for warning me.

Also, to those who've seen the silent Call of Cthulhu--the trailer seems to be playing it for camp. Is that the case or just a vibe I'm getting?

SirOtter
10-08-2010, 06:47 AM
Also, to those who've seen the silent Call of Cthulhu--the trailer seems to be playing it for camp. Is that the case or just a vibe I'm getting?

It's an attempt to recreate the style of silent movies of roughly the early 1920s, so it will seem a tad campy to modern viewers due to the acting style replicated therein. If you're comfortable with silent movies, it won't offend by its campiness.

blacbird
10-08-2010, 10:33 AM
I've never seen a dramatic adaptation of any Lovecraft tale that was worth sloth spit in a strong north wind. I've always thought that a really good director could do something with At the Mountains of Madness, but nobody has.

Haggis
10-08-2010, 03:04 PM
Darn that Dean Stockwell to Heck.

Calla Lily
10-08-2010, 05:21 PM
Sam Neill did a pseudo-Lovecraft movie back in 1995: In the Mouth of Madness. Enjoyable, mostly because they went for the HP feel rather than trying to adapt any one particular story. Plus, yanno, Sam Neill. Om nom nom.

Diana Hignutt
10-08-2010, 05:33 PM
Sam Neill did a pseudo-Lovecraft movie back in 1995: In the Mouth of Madness. Enjoyable, mostly because they went for the HP feel rather than trying to adapt any one particular story. Plus, yanno, Sam Neill. Om nom nom.

My thoughts exactly. Esp. the bolded.

robeiae
10-08-2010, 06:12 PM
Wait. Sandra Dee did a nude scene?

She covered her *you know* by holding a chihuahua over it...

robeiae
10-08-2010, 06:20 PM
Sam Neill did a pseudo-Lovecraft movie back in 1995: In the Mouth of Madness. Enjoyable, mostly because they went for the HP feel rather than trying to adapt any one particular story. Plus, yanno, Sam Neill. Om nom nom.

Well, that's more John Carpenter. Really, if you look at Halloween from Dr. Loomis' perspective, it could easily be "Lovecraftian."

There's also Lord of Illusions--which I guess owes more to Barker's tendencies--but it's the right kind of story, too.

Diana Hignutt
10-08-2010, 06:55 PM
Darn that Dean Stockwell to Heck.

Hey, watch that language!

Haggis
10-08-2010, 06:55 PM
She covered her *you know* by holding a chihuahua over it...
:e2thud:

Calla Lily
10-08-2010, 07:22 PM
Lord of Illusions didn't do it for me. Perhaps because I don't care for Barker. I read the original story and he just makes me feel icky. Not as much as Harlan Ellison, tho. I give him props as a brilliant writer, yet he makes me dive for the brain bleach. After "I have No Mouth and I Must Scream" I swore off him for life. My brain thanked me.

Wrenching thread sort of back on topic:

Has anyone read the antho Shadows over Baker Street? This book is absolutely brilliant. The premise is: Holmes meets Lovecraft's world. The opening story is Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald." :Hail:

(Note: I'm leaving in a few for the House of Love, and won't be back online till Sunday night. Make sure y'all howl the rites at the appropriate times. :))

Diana Hignutt
10-08-2010, 07:27 PM
Wrenching thread sort of back on topic:

Has anyone read the antho Shadows over Baker Street? This book is absolutely brilliant. The premise is: Holmes meets Lovecraft's world. The opening story is Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald." :Hail:

()

No, but, I'm ordering now for a birthday present for myself...

DavidZahir
10-08-2010, 07:49 PM
Oh, I love that story! Must look for it now!

As I understand it, Call of Cthulhu was intended to be the silent movie that someone might have made of Lovecraft's story. Personally, I thought it worked very well.

Here's the teaser (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQkos7WTHjg) for their next production, which looks great! And this is the longer trailer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pd5gWGfnK5M).

Just mentioning--the Whedonverse is essentially Lovecraftian at least in some aspects.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-09-2010, 02:01 AM
Doesn't The Mist have Lovecraftian aspects (monsterwise, anyway)? Oh, and then there's Thomas Jane.

Diana Hignutt
10-10-2010, 12:19 AM
Doesn't The Mist have Lovecraftian aspects (monsterwise, anyway)? Oh, and then there's Thomas Jane.

Yeah, but...the ending...is unnecessarily...you know....

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-11-2010, 11:30 AM
Yeah, but...the ending...is unnecessarily...you know....

Yeah if you could lop off everything after the Dead Can Dance song, The Mist would be a much better movie.

Has anyone seen the 2009 Dunwich Horror? I caught a few minutes of the middle on SyFy and it didn't look terrible, but I didn't want to watch without seeing the beginning. The fact that it was on SyFy on a Saturday night doesn't give me much confidence.

Calla Lily
10-11-2010, 06:37 PM
SyFy tried Lovecraft? :Headbang:

Ferret
10-11-2010, 08:12 PM
Dreams in the Witch House, a short that's part of the Masters of Horror series, is probably the best H P Lovecraft adaptation I've seen.

Diana Hignutt
10-11-2010, 08:48 PM
Dreams in the Witch House, a short that's part of the Masters of Horror series, is probably the best H P Lovecraft adaptation I've seen.

One of my favorite stories...I'll be on the lookout for this one too.

Calla Lily
10-11-2010, 08:51 PM
I forgot about that one. I agree, not too bad.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-12-2010, 01:14 AM
Dreams in the Witch House, a short that's part of the Masters of Horror series, is probably the best H P Lovecraft adaptation I've seen.

That's a triple whammy: Ezra Goddin (from Dagon), Lovecraft, and a mouse with a human face. I remember seeing that when it originally aired.

It's available on Netflix Instant Streaming.

BeatrixKiddo
10-12-2010, 07:41 AM
Not sure if you'd be interested in comic adaptations, but there was a comic series that came out in 2009 I believe called The Fall Of Cthulhu. Not sure how close it follows the stories but its artwork is described as "Lovecraftian". I know there have been other comic adaptations of his stories over the years.

Diana Hignutt
10-13-2010, 02:41 PM
My birthday copy of Call of Cthulhu came yesterday (a day early) so we watched it. I loved it. Masterful adaptation. Not for everyone, due to it's mythoscope, silent movie treatment, but...wow. My Lizzie was very doubtful at the beginning, but she became enraptured with it too.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-13-2010, 02:56 PM
My birthday copy of Call of Cthulhu came yesterday (a day early) so we watched it. I loved it. Masterful adaptation. Not for everyone, due to it's mythoscope, silent movie treatment, but...wow.

It's also on Netflix Instant Streaming BTW. And no I don't own stock in Netflix...

Diana Hignutt
10-13-2010, 03:00 PM
It's also on Netflix Instant Streaming BTW. And no I don't own stock in Netflix...

Yeah, I've got this stupid collection thing going with DVD's...

I don't have a Playstation or a Wii, so I can't get Netflix streaming...

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-13-2010, 03:17 PM
I get Netflix Streaming on my computer (also on my PS3), but my computer monitor is rocking. I just started watching it (Call of Cthulhu); so far so good. I wonder why they made it silent.

Diana Hignutt
10-13-2010, 03:42 PM
I get Netflix Streaming on my computer (also on my PS3), but my computer monitor is rocking. I just started watching it (Call of Cthulhu); so far so good. I wonder why they made it silent.

My guess...budget...cheapish effects, but fine by classic silent B&W standards. Also, I think they were trying to make a movie that seemed to be made right after Lovecraft's story was published. That's my guess.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
10-13-2010, 03:58 PM
See, as an amateur filmmaker myself, I would think silent would be more expensive. But that's probably cos I never had to mix and edit sound. I could imagine that would bump up a budget.

Calla Lily
10-13-2010, 04:12 PM
My son mixes and edits for his college performing arts center. (He's getting better each year, but still far from pro.) For movies, it appears to be one of those situations where the equipment won't break the bank, but paying someone with the experience to do it right will.

Cynical comment follows:

I wonder if silent is the only way to go because any actor trying to pronounce the melange of letters in a Cthulhu chant just sounds silly. And that ruins the whole OMG CTHULHU'S COMING AAAAAGGGHHH!!! atmosphere.

Dean Stockwell, as serious as he was while chanting "Yog-Sothoth" over a nekkid Sandra Dee--made me laugh. And that kinda defeated the whole interspecies sex-horror-impregnation dynamic there. :tongue

SirOtter
10-15-2010, 01:34 AM
I wonder if silent is the only way to go because any actor trying to pronounce the melange of letters in a Cthulhu chant just sounds silly. And that ruins the whole OMG CTHULHU'S COMING AAAAAGGGHHH!!! atmosphere.

Forry Ackerman (who was Lovecraft's literary agent, among many other things) told me in 1980 that Lovecraft pronounced Cthulhu as k'TULL-uh.

There were a couple of Cthulhu Mythos related segments of Night Gallery, and if you're in the mood for a spoof, there's a short film called Late Bloomer, which applies a Lovecraftian flavor to a junior high sex ed class. Very funny stuff. A snippet of the first minute and a half or so is available on YouTube.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
11-14-2010, 07:32 PM
Southpark. This season. Best Lovecraft Adaption Ever.


“Passengers waiting for flight 73 to New Orleans, we thank you for your patience, but the conditions in the Gulf are still delaying our departure. Unfortunately we’ve just been informed that the dark lord Cthulhu has shat on the runway at the New Orleans airport, and we’ll be delayed at least another hour.”
“I’m so freaking stoked that Cthulhu’s gonna squash all the happy-go-lucky conformists.”

“Yeah. I just hope he puts an end to the fucking Disney Channel.”
“Hey Cthulhu. ‘Sup.”

“No! Dude! Colorado’s that way! Goddammit why don’t dark lords fucking listen?!”

Calla Lily
11-14-2010, 08:14 PM
My college-age son has been giving me detailed synopses of those episodes when he comes home on Sundays to watch football.