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Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 04:58 AM
I'm so sick of the 100% ambiguous ending! Can someone tell me the point of it? Is it supposed to MAKE ME THINK? I don't need to think! I spent the whole book thinking! To be clear, I don't mind an ending left partly ambiguous, you know, like, they defeated the vampires, but will they make their rocky relationship work? Or something. But to spend the entire book going WILL SHE??? WON'T SHE???, keeping the reader on edge, and then just saying, screw it, I'm not telling you! feels like nothing but a cheap played out gimmick.

I just finished a book about whether or not a girl will commit suicide. And...I'll never know. What is the point of a book like that??? This is a book by an author I like, but grrrrrr! Another book that enraged me hinged entirely upon whether a murder would take place or not, and the ending never revealed it. IMNSHO, the only excuse for leaving a story unfinished like that is the author's untimely death. :Soapbox:

Wayne K
10-01-2010, 05:03 AM
I'm so sick of the 100% ambiguous ending! Can someone tell me the point of it? Is it supposed to MAKE ME THINK? I don't need to think! I spent the whole book thinking! To be clear, I don't mind an ending left partly ambiguous, you know, like, they defeated the vampires, but will they make their rocky relationship work? Or something. But to spend the entire book going WILL SHE??? WON'T SHE???, keeping the reader on edge, and then just saying, screw it, I'm not telling you! feels like nothing but a cheap played out gimmick.

I just finished a book about whether or not a girl will commit suicide. And...I'll never know. What is the point of a book like that??? This is a book by an author I like, but grrrrrr! Another book that enraged me hinged entirely upon whether a murder would take place or not, and the ending never revealed it. IMNSHO, the only excuse for leaving a story unfinished like that is the author's untimely death. :Soapbox:

Which sounds likely :D

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 05:13 AM
Ambiguous =/= unsatisfactory.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 05:13 AM
No, these are books published by major houses. The suicide one is like the author's 10th book. The murder one was a debut novel.

Cyia
10-01-2010, 05:14 AM
I just finished a book about whether or not a girl will commit suicide. And...I'll never know. What is the point of a book like that??? This is a book by an author I like, but grrrrrr! Another book that enraged me hinged entirely upon whether a murder would take place or not, and the ending never revealed it. IMNSHO, the only excuse for leaving a story unfinished like that is the author's untimely death. :Soapbox:

I don't buy the value in an ambiguous ending or the "it's to make you think" excuse. If anything, it's a cop out because the author doesn't want to "offend" or "disappoint" anyone by giving a concrete answer they might not like. With the open ending, it's supposed to be open to the interpretation of the reader, but I don't read a book to see how I would end it. I read a book to see how THE AUTHOR would end it. I may like it; I may hate it, but it's not my story, nor is it my responsibility to finish it.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 05:14 AM
Ambiguous =/= unsatisfactory.

Fair enough. But leaving the main question of the plot 100% ambiguous = 100% enraging and unsatisfying.

MissMacchiato
10-01-2010, 05:16 AM
I hate ambiguity. I read for mindless pleasure. SPOON FEED ME, DAMN IT!

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 05:16 AM
I'd love to know what books you're referring to.

Yep. I haz a nosy. :D

ccarver30
10-01-2010, 05:20 AM
I don't buy the value in an ambiguous ending or the "it's to make you think" excuse. If anything, it's a cop out because the author doesn't want to "offend" or "disappoint" anyone by giving a concrete answer they might not like. With the open ending, it's supposed to be open to the interpretation of the reader, but I don't read a book to see how I would end it. I read a book to see how THE AUTHOR would end it. I may like it; I may hate it, but it's not my story, nor is it my responsibility to finish it.


While this is true, I don't think I could live with myself.

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 05:21 AM
I like ambiguous endings because they show the characters have a life beyond the last page turn.

Well, unless they bump themselves off of course...

Although their story - or this story, this section of their life - is complete, they carry on and have other stories to tell.

Susan Littlefield
10-01-2010, 05:29 AM
Yeah. What books?

Maybe the author is writing a series, thus you will find out in number two or whatever is next.

Soccer Mom
10-01-2010, 05:32 AM
I'm in the "hates ambiguous endings" camp. Tell me a story, including the end, please.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 05:39 AM
Yeah. What books?

Maybe the author is writing a series, thus you will find out in number two or whatever is next.

I'll rep you. The murder one--yeah, it actually is part of a series. The other book takes place simultaneously but in another town, so as to not reveal whether the murder took place or not! Sigh. The suicide one isn't really a series book.

Calla Lily
10-01-2010, 05:40 AM
I'm in the "hates ambiguous endings" camp. Tell me a story, including the end, please.

*jumps on Soccer Mom's bandwagon*

HelloKiddo
10-01-2010, 06:26 AM
Are you sure it wasn't "I'll give you a hint what happened, but I'm not gonna spell it out"? That's different from "Choose your own ending."

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 06:32 AM
Nope, both books were 100% ambiguous--Will he or won't he? HAHAHA YOU'LL NEVER KNOW!

Monkey
10-01-2010, 06:58 AM
In general, it sounds like a terrible way to end a book.

And yet, I always liked the particular story you refer to. I came up with the ending I wanted almost immediately, and just assume that because the author didn't say how it ended, my ending is just as valid as anyone else's.

......... II Tiger Door .......
......x Hero...................Both doors' hinges are toward the hero.
..........II Lady Door.......

The hero opens both doors at the same time, creating a zone of safety, like this:

....................Doorway
Tiger............/..|
................< x.|
Lady............\..|
....................Doorway

And the Tiger eats the Lady!!

:D A happy ending. :D

kaitie
10-01-2010, 07:00 AM
Rep me, too. I wanna know. :D

leahzero
10-01-2010, 07:10 AM
There was a particularly hyped blockbuster movie this summer that ended ambiguously, too. My entire theater burst out laughing at the final scene. (It was not funny.)

The open-ended ending is hard to do well, IMO. And most I've read come across like cop-outs. A book can end ambiguously but still give you a sense of resolution, like a character pondering suicide who has faced his or her demons.

If there's no sense of resolution, however small or slight, I feel cheated. If I wanted a complicated story with no resolution that will someday end in media res, I have my real life.

poetinahat
10-01-2010, 07:17 AM
I'm in the "don't want all books written by the same formula" camp. I'm quite all right with being made to think. But yeah, if a sunset ending appears on the cards, I don't want a fricken Monty Python foot. Unless it's Monty Python.

It depends for me on whether I've got expectations at the outset - is it a crime novel, for example, and do I expect the mystery to be solved, and to have the solution explained at the end? Do I expect for all of the relevant information to have been included along the way? Am I angry if the whole thing hinges upon some fact that I was never told? Well, if so: yes, yes, yes, yes.

But does a novel need a Disneyesque, ride-into-the-sunset, all-questions-answered ending? No, not all the time. Sometimes, for me, no ending is an ending.

Sometimes I can enjoy a book where there's no point to the middle -- in three tries, I haven't yet been able to finish Ulysses, but in parts, it's a wondrous thing. Soul Mountain, on the other hand, I got all the way through and felt no satisfaction; I wished I hadn't.

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 07:26 AM
Satisfying resolution, yes.

Patronising author spoonfeeding me every last detail, HELL to the fuck no.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 07:57 AM
But isn't it just the height of authorial crappery to ask one question for the entire novel, hold us in breathless page-turning suspense all the way through, and then not even hint at what might happen?

kuwisdelu
10-01-2010, 08:17 AM
But isn't it just the height of authorial crappery to ask one question for the entire novel, hold us in breathless page-turning suspense all the way through, and then not even hint at what might happen?

I'd say it depends on the nature of the question.

poetinahat
10-01-2010, 08:22 AM
But isn't it just the height of authorial crappery to ask one question for the entire novel, hold us in breathless page-turning suspense all the way through, and then not even hint at what might happen?
:yessmiley

Susan Littlefield
10-01-2010, 08:45 AM
Well, if the book was not meant to be serialized, then it should have had a complete ending, or at least given some type of indication what the ending was.

That's it, I'm rep'in ya'all!!:D

MissMacchiato
10-01-2010, 09:35 AM
Satisfying resolution, yes.

Patronising author spoonfeeding me every last detail, HELL to the fuck no.

Lol, absolutely. I'm just being facetious.

Mr Flibble
10-01-2010, 11:24 AM
Originally Posted by scarletpeaches http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=5379847#post5379847)
Satisfying resolution, yes.

Patronising author spoonfeeding me every last detail, HELL to the fuck no.


Satisfying ending that actually gives you at least part of the answer to the whole story question that you read the chuffing book for =/= patronising spoonfeeding by author.


Well it might sometimes, but it's not a given.

Ms Hollands
10-01-2010, 12:26 PM
I want closure when I close the book. That doesn't mean I stop thinking, but it does leave me satisfied while thinking. Spoon feed me as well!

gothicangel
10-01-2010, 01:32 PM
Well my WIP has an open ending. The bad guy gets caught etc, but . . .

I'm not a fricken soap writer so my crime victims don't just wake up the next day and shrug off the psychological damage quite so easily.

shaldna
10-01-2010, 06:03 PM
I feel cheated if I don't get answers.

Jamesaritchie
10-01-2010, 06:58 PM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.

frolzagain
10-01-2010, 07:40 PM
I agree that books should give some sort of answer, closure etc. It's a bit like the dissaointment of reading an entire book only to find out the entire things has been a dream or imagination of the MC. So lame.

Soccer Mom
10-01-2010, 08:23 PM
I don't think every story thread needs to be tied up with a bow, especially for multi-book story arcs in a series. But I hate cop outs. I love Jodi Picoult, but the ending to My Sister's Keeper? Grr! You spend the whole book with a gut wrenching dilemma and then end it with a big "Oh. Never mind." Gah! And to pose a question like whether a character will kill herself and then end it with a sly "I'll let you decide" truly pisses me off. It's a cop out.

willietheshakes
10-01-2010, 08:24 PM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.

Nah, fuck that.

Some endings need to be ambiguous, to a greater or lesser degree. There are some questions that an author absolutely shouldn't answer.

Both Before I Wake and The World More Full of Weeping have pretty ambiguous endings. They don't tie everything up in a bow. They don't answer significant (perhaps THE) questions.

And they work.

So take your dead bunnies and your patronizing stereotypes elsewhere.

Shadow_Ferret
10-01-2010, 08:27 PM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.

I agree. If I read a book like that I'd take it back to the bookstore and demand my money back because the ending was missing.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 08:28 PM
OK, so what is the purpose (fiction-wise) of presenting one question for the entire book, keeping the reader turning pages to get the answer, and then ending the book moments before that question is answered?

brainstorm77
10-01-2010, 08:28 PM
I'm so sick of the 100% ambiguous ending! Can someone tell me the point of it? Is it supposed to MAKE ME THINK? I don't need to think! I spent the whole book thinking! To be clear, I don't mind an ending left partly ambiguous, you know, like, they defeated the vampires, but will they make their rocky relationship work? Or something. But to spend the entire book going WILL SHE??? WON'T SHE???, keeping the reader on edge, and then just saying, screw it, I'm not telling you! feels like nothing but a cheap played out gimmick.

I just finished a book about whether or not a girl will commit suicide. And...I'll never know. What is the point of a book like that??? This is a book by an author I like, but grrrrrr! Another book that enraged me hinged entirely upon whether a murder would take place or not, and the ending never revealed it. IMNSHO, the only excuse for leaving a story unfinished like that is the author's untimely death. :Soapbox:

I had this happen recently with a horror novel. It really didn't have an ending. It was like the author decided in one page, he had enough of telling the story.

CaroGirl
10-01-2010, 08:29 PM
If you want a guarantee of neatly tied bows and ducks in a row, read romance. Ambiguous endings can be satisfying if they're the right ending for the story, and sometimes they are.

willietheshakes
10-01-2010, 08:54 PM
OK, so what is the purpose (fiction-wise) of presenting one question for the entire book, keeping the reader turning pages to get the answer, and then ending the book moments before that question is answered?

Because sometimes the question you're asking only seems important...

Take TWMFoW -- much of it hinges on who Carly, the mysterious girl who seems to live in the woods, actually is. Is she a real girl? A vision? A phantom? A ghost? A faerie? A nature spirit?

The story hinges on her. But ultimately? Who or what she is not only doesn't matter, but answering the question would limit the magic and break the spell...

There's not enough mystery in the world. I like to do my part to add to it.

veinglory
10-01-2010, 08:57 PM
I think they simply suck dead bunnies.

I so didn't need that image in my head....

CaroGirl
10-01-2010, 09:05 PM
Because sometimes the question you're asking only seems important...

Take TWMFoW -- much of it hinges on who Carly, the mysterious girl who seems to live in the woods, actually is. Is she a real girl? A vision? A phantom? A ghost? A faerie? A nature spirit?

The story hinges on her. But ultimately? Who or what she is not only doesn't matter, but answering the question would limit the magic and break the spell...

There's not enough mystery in the world. I like to do my part to add to it.
If you'd provided a "definition" of Carly, it would've ruined the story.

willietheshakes
10-01-2010, 09:14 PM
If you'd provided a "definition" of Carly, it would've ruined the story.

Precisely!

(And thanks.)

Shadow_Ferret
10-01-2010, 09:18 PM
Take TWMFoW --

Please.

:D

(sorry, felt a little Henny Youngmanish there)

Toothpaste
10-01-2010, 09:26 PM
OK, so what is the purpose (fiction-wise) of presenting one question for the entire book, keeping the reader turning pages to get the answer, and then ending the book moments before that question is answered?

Maybe the moral of the story is that, in the end, the answer to the question isn't as important as the journey that happened in seeking it out. Sounds a bit cheesy, but I can totally see that as being a valid reason not to wrap everything up. Now there are books out there where clearly an ambiguous ending can be a cop out, but there are times it is on purpose, the author wanted it from the beginning. The ambiguous ending itself can be the point of the story.

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 09:28 PM
Nah, fuck that.

Some endings need to be ambiguous, to a greater or lesser degree. There are some questions that an author absolutely shouldn't answer.

Both Before I Wake and The World More Full of Weeping have pretty ambiguous endings. They don't tie everything up in a bow. They don't answer significant (perhaps THE) questions.

And they work.

So take your dead bunnies and your patronizing stereotypes elsewhere.You're just not mature enough to understand.
OK, so what is the purpose (fiction-wise) of presenting one question for the entire book, keeping the reader turning pages to get the answer, and then ending the book moments before that question is answered?I'm going to have to read that book before I answer the question.
If you want a guarantee of neatly tied bows and ducks in a row, read romance. Ambiguous endings can be satisfying if they're the right ending for the story, and sometimes they are.Um...no. Just no. Romance doesn't always have a 'spoonfeedy' ending, hence the acronym 'HFN'.

CaroGirl
10-01-2010, 09:31 PM
Um...no. Just no. Romance doesn't always have a 'spoonfeedy' ending, hence the acronym 'HFN'.
Ah. I thought that was why many people read romance. Because of the guaranteed HEA and lack of loose ends. I'm not trying to bash romance. I don't read it myself, as a rule, but I know others love it because of the security it offers, is my point.

Dang it, why don't I know what HFN is?

Shadow_Ferret
10-01-2010, 09:35 PM
Can I guess? Happy For Now?

scarletpeaches
10-01-2010, 09:37 PM
Congrats to Fuzzface! C'mere, gimme a hug. :D

Phaeal
10-01-2010, 09:39 PM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.

I disagree. They suck putrid green moose members. Joint US and Canadian research has proven this.

Kitty Pryde
10-01-2010, 09:57 PM
Because sometimes the question you're asking only seems important...

Take TWMFoW -- much of it hinges on who Carly, the mysterious girl who seems to live in the woods, actually is. Is she a real girl? A vision? A phantom? A ghost? A faerie? A nature spirit?

The story hinges on her. But ultimately? Who or what she is not only doesn't matter, but answering the question would limit the magic and break the spell...

There's not enough mystery in the world. I like to do my part to add to it.

Cheers. It sounds sort of like a magical realism type thing, ish. And the answer to the question is that she is an unknowable entity to the others. I'll have to read it I suppose :)


Maybe the moral of the story is that, in the end, the answer to the question isn't as important as the journey that happened in seeking it out. Sounds a bit cheesy, but I can totally see that as being a valid reason not to wrap everything up. Now there are books out there where clearly an ambiguous ending can be a cop out, but there are times it is on purpose, the author wanted it from the beginning. The ambiguous ending itself can be the point of the story.

When you put it that way...I dunno, it seems like maybe the ending is left ambiguous to encourage the reader to go out in the world and complete the happy ending? Like, was the friend reaching out to the suicidal character enough to prevent her death? You don't know so you'll have to finish the story within your own life. I don't know. If she killed her off, it would have been a total downer, and the message would be that the outreach was too little too late.

If she had decided to live, I don't know, I think that's still an interesting ending--certainly not a straight HEA or even a HFN. Her road to mental and physical recovery will still be difficult, she still faces mental health problems that might be lifelong. She still has very limited resources, emotionally and socially. Another important character is still in danger of dying. Parents are still clueless. High school is still savage and unrelenting. If she lived it validates the importance of human outreach and empathy towards people who may be unpleasant and unfriendly because they are hurting so much.

kuwisdelu
10-01-2010, 10:00 PM
I like a good ambiguous ending if it's the most appropriate one. It certainly can be. I like endings that make me think. I especially love endings that can be interpreted differently depending on your own reading — they're much more interesting to discuss.

If it's just to screw with the reader, though, that's different.

Sevvy
10-02-2010, 12:57 AM
I think in some cases, these books aren't about what happens next. Perhaps it doesn't matter whether the person was murdered, or committed suicide, but the point of the book were the events leading up to that choice. Though if that was the point, I guess it didn't come through in the writing anyway.

Stlight
10-02-2010, 01:11 AM
KittyP, please rep me the none series author. I know what to expect with series, don't buy them until I can buy all of them.

This is my view if an author starts a book, that author should finish it in the world s/he created. That's his/her job, not mine. If I want to finish writing a book, I'll write the beginning and the middle.

Ambiguous endings for any genre except the I've-got-to-make-you-crazy-existentialist stuff, puts the author on my Do not buy list. Did you notice I'm not talking about just romances here? I don't care whether it's a HEA or not. I want the ending spelled out and the loose ends tied up.

But I'm still bitter after reading a triology fantasy, and EVERYONE was dead at the end. Not a HEA not an unhappy ending, just a nothing ending. Just a flippin' existential ending.

This is my opinion and I'm sticking with it.

Xelebes
10-02-2010, 02:53 AM
I'm a fan of the ambiguous ending myself, so I'm willing to bet there are other readers out there who dig the ambiguous endings just as much as I do. However, the successful execution of it will have tone and theme lay out the unwritten ending.

Eddyz Aquila
10-02-2010, 04:21 AM
Ambiguous endings are good because it leaves me with a feeling of suspense, excitement and lots and lots of FOOD FOR THOUGHT. :D
Seriously now, I can think of so many things after I put down a book, if the ending is somewhat vague it will only make me ask myself what could happen and in many cases look up the sequel on B&N and Amazon.

Polenth
10-02-2010, 04:59 AM
I don't mind ambiguous as long as some of the questions are answered. One short I disliked had a mysterious event going to happen. One question was whether the event really was going to happen or not. The other was whether it was good or bad.

The story cuts off before either of those is answered. It's like the author decided to stop writing before finishing. It wasn't satisfying at all.

If it'd carried on to the event starting, but cut out at that point, it would have been satisfying and ambiguous. I still wouldn't know if the event was good or bad, but it would have answered the question about whether it was real.

gothicangel
10-02-2010, 12:43 PM
But I'm still bitter after reading a triology fantasy, and EVERYONE was dead at the end. Not a HEA not an unhappy ending, just a nothing ending. Just a flippin' existential ending.

This is my opinion and I'm sticking with it.

Now, that would really piss me off.

DancingMaenid
10-02-2010, 01:05 PM
For me, it depends on what you mean by ambiguous, and the story. I want the ending to give me something, but I don't necessarily need everything tied up with a bow, either. I like endings that are open to interpretation, sometimes, and I like stories that make me think.

I also think that sometimes, a story can answer the important questions while leaving other things open.

But it depends on the story somewhat. If I'm reading a mystery novel, for example, I expect a tight conclusion at the end that will explain everything.

Darzian
10-03-2010, 04:12 AM
I agree that some ambiguous endings can be good and work (eg. Inception) but they often don't. Kitty's example suggests that the primarily plotline of the story was left unanswered. Seriously, what's the point of that? I don't think "letting the reader think of an answer" is a reasonable response. The writer wrote the story and saying "I'm stopping here now. YOU think of the rest" is just unfair.

(Note: I'm talking about critical plotlines remaining unsolved with no sense of direction. eg. ending LOTR as Frodo stares at Mt Doom, ending HP when Harry meets Voldy etc etc)

JoNightshade
10-03-2010, 04:21 AM
I like a good ambiguous ending if it's the most appropriate one. It certainly can be. I like endings that make me think. I especially love endings that can be interpreted differently depending on your own reading they're much more interesting to discuss.

If it's just to screw with the reader, though, that's different.

100% agreed with this.

And as to the thread title - I HATE the Lady or the Tiger SO MUCH. I had never read the story, and then I went to the theatre one night for a show that was like three mini plays. One of them was The Lady or the Tiger. I WAS SO PISSED OFF when it just ENDED. It drives me insane. There was no, "Oooh, think about it" moment. It was just the author thumbing his nose at the audience. Jerk.

Devil Ledbetter
10-03-2010, 04:57 AM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.Yes.

One that come to mind is the ending of How to be Good by Nick Hornby. He didn't know how to end it, apparently, and thought mindless surrealism would do the job.

willietheshakes
10-03-2010, 06:05 AM
Yes.

One that come to mind is the ending of How to be Good by Nick Hornby. He didn't know how to end it, apparently, and thought mindless surrealism would do the job.

Ah, fuck it.

I have prologues and ambiguous endings, and my books are neither "literary" nor self-consciously "sophisticated".

Like everything else, they're either well done, or they're not. They either work, or they don't. Nothing else matters.

Ms Hollands
10-03-2010, 11:44 AM
Maybe the moral of the story is that, in the end, the answer to the question isn't as important as the journey that happened in seeking it out. Sounds a bit cheesy, but I can totally see that as being a valid reason not to wrap everything up. Now there are books out there where clearly an ambiguous ending can be a cop out, but there are times it is on purpose, the author wanted it from the beginning. The ambiguous ending itself can be the point of the story.

In which case it has closure in a less literal way, but it still has closure. It's the books that leave me with nothing to go on that annoy me. For instance, The Reluctant Fundamentalist. Okay, the book is probably meant to make me think about who do you trust and who is really the 'bad' nation/person or maybe it's just all perspective blah blah blah. But I already think those things. The book didn't make me question anything new. It just gave me a story and then finished it without telling me what happened. Something happened. I'll never know who it happened to. That just sucks a big fat one.

Devil Ledbetter
10-03-2010, 06:28 PM
Ah, fuck it.

I have prologues and ambiguous endings, and my books are neither "literary" nor self-consciously "sophisticated".

Like everything else, they're either well done, or they're not. They either work, or they don't. Nothing else matters.Fair enough. Hornby's didn't work for me. But I should have thrown that book at the wall the minute I saw his protag's name was "Katie." My bad.

scarletpeaches
10-03-2010, 06:30 PM
Such endings are supposed to be "literary" and "sophisticated". I think they simply suck dead bunnies.I would have thought someone as intelligent as you could work out what those ambiguous endings mean.

ElsaM
10-04-2010, 06:05 AM
Maybe the moral of the story is that, in the end, the answer to the question isn't as important as the journey that happened in seeking it out. Sounds a bit cheesy, but I can totally see that as being a valid reason not to wrap everything up. Now there are books out there where clearly an ambiguous ending can be a cop out, but there are times it is on purpose, the author wanted it from the beginning. The ambiguous ending itself can be the point of the story.

I agree with the above, although I'll qualify that by admitting that I love a good, well executed ambigous ending.

I think I may have read the suicide book, and my take on it was that the main character's story was pretty much wrapped up. She'd come to some peace within herself, and whether or not she actually went through with the suicide was less important. I reread the ending a couple of times and felt that there were some hints as to which way she would have gone, but maybe that was just my interpretation.

Toothpaste
10-04-2010, 05:48 PM
I didn't see the play, but I did see the film version of DOUBT. Considering the title of the movie it would hardly have made sense to do an un-ambiguous ending. I thought not knowing (though everyone I know who has seen it has their theory - though mine is the correct one :) ) was just as important as the journey we took with the characters.