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RainyDayNinja
08-29-2010, 05:16 AM
Can anyone give me ideas for famous women in history whose lives were ruined by an affair? The time period and place don't really matter

Cella
08-29-2010, 05:30 AM
Bathsheba? Did I spell that right?

Ken
08-29-2010, 05:36 AM
... maybe a former Queen of England? Kinda recall one being sent to the block for infidelity.

maggi90w1
08-29-2010, 05:37 AM
Anne Boleyn? Does that count?

edit: And Katherine Howard. She definitely counts.

scarletpeaches
08-29-2010, 05:38 AM
There was never any evidence of Anne Boleyn having an affair with anyone.

Katherine Howard, on the other hand, was sent to the block.

RainyDayNinja
08-29-2010, 06:01 AM
Hmm... I think Anne Boleyn is just what I need. Thanks a bunch!

scarletpeaches
08-29-2010, 06:03 AM
But...she didn't have an affair!

Cyia
08-29-2010, 06:09 AM
Nope. Annie got a bad rap. (She was actually executed for treason, IIRC, and even that was a suspect charge.)

scarletpeaches
08-29-2010, 06:12 AM
Nope. Annie got a bad rap. (She was actually executed for treason, IIRC, and even that was a suspect charge.)Wasn't it adultery as well?

Or I could be thinking of the pre-contract with Percy...even though Henry divorced her before she was executed.

Which presents the question - why divorce her if they were never truly married? Covering his bases I should think.

But anyway...I reckon Anne was a virgin up until the time she married Henry (yes, yes, I know...you're thinking how could she keep him interested for seven years? Simple. By saying no). After? She was faithful to him.

The times and dates she was supposed to be banging all these other men were falsified - and proven to be falsified.

Cyia
08-29-2010, 06:19 AM
I was thinking he got jealous and tacked the adultery charge on to say that she'd been sharing secrets in bed or stealing secrets from her "lover" in bed. He couldn't charge her with one without charging her with the other, so he used both. Treason just so happened to be something he could kill her for, which "solved" his problems.

RainyDayNinja
08-29-2010, 06:26 AM
Well, I'm writing a time travel story anyway, so I don't mind invoking a little historical revisionism.

Cyia
08-29-2010, 06:33 AM
Well, I'm writing a time travel story anyway, so I don't mind invoking a little historical revisionism.

GAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

*faints*

scarletpeaches
08-29-2010, 06:37 AM
Revisionism yes, playing with that which is obviously untrue = bleh.

Giant Baby
08-29-2010, 09:33 AM
Please study Anne Boleyn before deciding whether you want to use her. She's a fascinating character in history, IMO. For me, if a writer chose to go back in time and depict her as a character who's actually committed the crimes Henry VIII had her charged with -- charges researchers have since cast grave doubts about the validity of -- I'd want some serious historical theory/evidence to back it up. Otherwise, as a woman, I'd throw the book against the wall and write a scathing letter to the author and his/her publisher.

For a woman to have been brought up on unfounded charges and executed for them back in the sixteenth century is a crying shame, of course, but it was what it was. Historians to have since posited that there is no evidence to support Henry VIII's charges of adultry (or other delightful crimes she was charged with). For a writer in the twenty-first century to go back in time and re-accuse her for the sake of a story is not cool. To women. Today.

Please be careful about going revisionist in this manner, unless you're going to let Anne Boleyn go all ninja on your ass, kill off half your characters (including Cromwell and Hank-8), and run off with the hero of your story with her bad-assed tot, Lizzy-1, in tow. Because then we'd be talking.

Have you considered the woman Jesus saved from stoning for the crime of adultry in the Gospel of John? She wasn't killed, but it's hard to imagine a universe where *that* wasn't a life-changing experience.

JemmaP
08-29-2010, 09:38 AM
I'd just like to chime in with the request that anone who writes a time travel where Anne Boleyn goes ninja and takes out Crommy and Henry VIII, please marry me and let me be your beta.

That's all. :P

waylander
08-29-2010, 01:49 PM
Guinevere?

maggi90w1
08-29-2010, 02:19 PM
When I said Anne Boleyn I did mean her liaison with Henry. After all the whole thing started out with an affair. Altough I'm not sure if they had sex before they were married. If that matters. I would still count it as an affair.

scarletpeaches
08-29-2010, 04:41 PM
Katherine Howard would be a far better bet.

(As for Anne having an affair with Henry? The king says he wants you, you go along with it. Especially when your family are all in on it too).

whimsical rabbit
08-29-2010, 05:19 PM
Emma Hamilton, with Horatio Nelson.

I found her life impressive to say the least, and would think it's certainly worth a read. :)

Kathie Freeman
08-31-2010, 08:12 PM
Emma Hamilton, with Horatio Nelson.

I found her life impressive to say the least, and would think it's certainly worth a read. :)

Lady Hamilton had numerous affairs including artist George Romney. I rember seeing 3 prtraits of her by 3 different artists at the Huntington Art Museum, but I don't recall who the others were. She died in poverty, in Naples, I believe.

katiemac
08-31-2010, 09:21 PM
I was thinking he got jealous and tacked the adultery charge on to say that she'd been sharing secrets in bed or stealing secrets from her "lover" in bed. He couldn't charge her with one without charging her with the other, so he used both. Treason just so happened to be something he could kill her for, which "solved" his problems.I think Henry considered adultery against the king treason in of itself. But yes, her charges included high treason, adultery and incest.

I like waylander's suggestion: Guinevere.

DeleyanLee
08-31-2010, 09:52 PM
The problem I have with Guinevere is that the whole Lancelot thing was added on by French poets to make the stories appeal to their patrons. That wasn't in the original stories at all. Guinevere was pretty much a non-entity. French poets knew that sex sold, after all.

There's some belief that Lucrezia Borgia had lovers, I believe one was her brother-in-law. There's also tons of rumors about Eleanor of Aquataine (though I don't buy into those) having an affair with her uncle while on Crusade with her husband.

Queen Charlotte of England (married to George IV) was tried for adultry before the House of Lords (IIRC). I believe she got off, but it was a HUGE scandal in the day. She's the closest thing I can think of as "ruined" by the scandal, as opposed to put to death.

mscelina
08-31-2010, 10:12 PM
Anne Boleyn's life was ruined by her husband's affair--his overwhelming desire to marry Jane Seymour and get a son. Most pre-eminent Tudor historians after the Victorian era agree that all the charges against her were unfounded--cooked up between Henry's goal of switching out wives, anti-Boleyn sentiment, Cromwell's growing anomosity to Boleyn power, Jane Rochford's jealousy and hatred of her husband, and a political atmosphere torn between the Reformist views of the Queen and her supporters and the more conservative appeal of the Seymours and their power base. Anne was a shrew, not an unfaithful wife.

It occurs to me, however, that you're missing an obvious candidate--Helen of Troy.

waylander
08-31-2010, 10:19 PM
The problem I have with Guinevere is that the whole Lancelot thing was added on by French poets to make the stories appeal to their patrons. That wasn't in the original stories at all. Guinevere was pretty much a non-entity. French poets knew that sex sold, after all.

True, but that is the best known version of the story and I took it that the OP wanted an example that a lot of people would be familiar with

DeleyanLee
08-31-2010, 10:29 PM
It occurs to me, however, that you're missing an obvious candidate--Helen of Troy.

I second Helen of Troy. I'm ashamed of myself that I forgot her.


True, but that is the best known version of the story and I took it that the OP wanted an example that a lot of people would be familiar with

Just pointing out that "common knowledge" isn't right in that regard either, as it isn't about Anne Boleyn.

One of the best and easiest slams against a woman you don't like is to brand her a whore or an adultress. It sells well and tends to stick into history books because it's great scandal. I'd wager that at least 90% of all historical women so labeled were just making somone really uncomfortable with how powerful or positioned they were. Anytime I read about a powerful woman labeled as sexually indiscriminate, I doubt it. It's just too easy and too obvious, especially when it's all hindsight.

For this, though, it totally depends on what the OP wants to do with it and whether they want to be historically accurate or go with "common knowledge".

RainyDayNinja
09-01-2010, 12:03 AM
I'm really just using it as a throwaway gag, as one character is bragging about his time-traveling sexual exploits.