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seun
08-27-2010, 04:28 PM
When writing, how closed off are you? Are we talking door shut, phone off while you're focused on what you're writing? Or are you still OK to talk to the outside world?

I ask because while writing last night, a friend I haven't seen in a while phoned me. My mobile was switched off so he left a message and while he didn't ask why my phone was off, he was obviously surprised that it was. If I'm writing, then my mobile is off and if anyone calls the house phone, my wife will tell them I'll call them back. It's been like this for a long time and I've never really considered it. Experiencing this last night made me wonder how others see it.

brainstorm77
08-27-2010, 04:32 PM
The ringer is often off on my phone anyway. Work was steady calling for overtime on my days off, and it was annoying. I don't do anything special to write TBH.

amlptj
08-27-2010, 04:36 PM
i can manage to write in many different sisuations, i have too with the life i have. One thing i have to do while writing though is either have music blasting! No music no writing.

The internet is my downfall when writing, so i'm thinking that i really need to turn off my wifi when i'm writing.

Margarita Skies
08-27-2010, 04:37 PM
The only thing that disturbs me is a really good movie or show on TV and when it's on, instead of stopping writing to watch it, I turn it off and write, even if I know there are no reruns of said show in sight. The music could be blasting in my house, my cousins could be screaming their lungs out, no problem. Actually, music gets me deeper into my writing.

seun
08-27-2010, 04:50 PM
I've been thinking about this phone issue most of the day - maybe it's on my mind because just about everyone has a mobile and is therefore reachable almost all of the time. Seeing myself from someone else's POV, maybe it does seem odd that I'm willingly unreachable.

Still not turning my phone on when I'm writing, though.

Said The Sun
08-27-2010, 04:58 PM
I totally zone-out when I'm writing, whether at home or at work. At home it's fine, I simply shut off my phone and my cat doesn't mind, at work I get extra annoyed with the phones ringing and people trying to tell me what they saw on the news last night while I'm trying to finish a chapter. By now everyone knows that if I'm working the keys like a maniac you better not disturb me because I'll just roll my eyes and stare at you in hatred.

Namatu
08-27-2010, 05:33 PM
I've been thinking about this phone issue most of the day - maybe it's on my mind because just about everyone has a mobile and is therefore reachable almost all of the time. Seeing myself from someone else's POV, maybe it does seem odd that I'm willingly unreachable.

Still not turning my phone on when I'm writing, though.I have difficultly ignoring the phone when it rings so I will shut mine off or silence the ringer. Besides, once I answer the phone, people will talk to me, and then I won't be writing. I'm also not fond of constant communication connectedness. I'll shut my phone off even when I'm not writing. :D

KTC
08-27-2010, 05:36 PM
hell, i have the tv on...and answer calls. sometimes alt/tab between writing and internet. i'm a multi-tasker in every aspect of my life.

CheyElizabeth
08-27-2010, 05:51 PM
I literally write sitting on the couch while my fiance plays very loud xbox games of Modern warfare or watches TV. I also text back and answer phone calls as they come in. For some reason, I work best this way. I'm very social. I've tried locking myself in a quet room, but I can't get any work done that way.

Jamesaritchie
08-27-2010, 06:16 PM
What's unusual about being unavailable? Most people have jobs where they can't answer the phone.

I do keep the phone turned on, but I don't answer it unless I can tell it's an important call. Very important.

It isn't amatter of time, or of needing silence, or of anything else except I'm writing, so leave me the hell alone."

scarletpeaches
08-27-2010, 06:21 PM
I've been thinking about this phone issue most of the day - maybe it's on my mind because just about everyone has a mobile and is therefore reachable almost all of the time. Seeing myself from someone else's POV, maybe it does seem odd that I'm willingly unreachable.

Still not turning my phone on when I'm writing, though.Phones are supposed to serve you, not summon you.

As a friend of mine said, "There's no law in this country that says if your door goes you've got to answer it."

People are often surprised when I switch my phone off, but I don't understand why they would think I want to be contactable 24 hours a day, or why I would be happy to answer the door whenever they call round.

All these widgets and gadgets are supposed to make life easier for us, not more stressful.

Bbut to answer your original question, I live on my own so it's pretty easy to ignore the phone, television, door, what have you. It's annoying when the intercom goes late at night but I ignore it. I've no need to answer because I know it's not for anyone else in this household.

spike
08-27-2010, 06:27 PM
I can write almost anywhere, as long as no one talks directly to me (I will type what they are saying, so I have to stop), or as long as there isn't anything interesting going on around me (not too often, as I am easily bored).

What is odd is the way people think that you should be available by phone whenever they want you. I frequently do not answer my phone, and sometimes even turn it off. If it is important they will call back.

I bought my first cell phone about 20 years ago, that means I've lived 30 years without one. We survived without being constantly contactable, why do we need to be now?

Susan Littlefield
08-27-2010, 06:28 PM
When writing, how closed off are you? Are we talking door shut, phone off while you're focused on what you're writing? Or are you still OK to talk to the outside world?

I ask because while writing last night, a friend I haven't seen in a while phoned me. My mobile was switched off so he left a message and while he didn't ask why my phone was off, he was obviously surprised that it was. If I'm writing, then my mobile is off and if anyone calls the house phone, my wife will tell them I'll call them back. It's been like this for a long time and I've never really considered it. Experiencing this last night made me wonder how others see it.

I like it quiet when I'm writing. If it's writing at the law office, I have to take the calls and interact with other people. If it's home-I will answer the phone once in awhile, but not often. I like to devote my time to writing, because otherwise I would not get anything done.

Shakesbear
08-27-2010, 06:32 PM
I have my land line phone unplugged almost all the time. I have the mobile on but usually in another room so I don't hear it if it does ring. I need silence to write in as I see in my mind the scene I am writing about and noise dissipates the image. I also don't answer the door if any one knocks - I live alone and cold callers are ignored.

seun
08-27-2010, 07:56 PM
People are often surprised when I switch my phone off, but I don't understand why they would think I want to be contactable 24 hours a day, or why I would be happy to answer the door whenever they call round.


You're me. Only with, you know, hair and lady parts.

KTC
08-27-2010, 08:08 PM
unwritingrelatedly, i only answer the door or phone when i want to. i do not feel compelled to do so. i could be standing in my front foyer (we have glass in our double front doors and those at the door can see in) and still not answer the door. i do that if someone is selling door to door. they sometimes say something loud enough for me to hear..."aren't you going to answer your door?" "No." "That's rude." "NO...rude is when someone you don't want on your doorstep is on your doorstep. Ruder is when they don't take the hint and leave." conversations of the like are quite common. they really cannot believe that people won't answer their door. i love the comment, "You mean you don't want to save money..." "that's exactly what i mean, yes."

Cyia
08-27-2010, 08:19 PM
The ideas of rude behavior have flipped somewhat, and continue to do so as things become more "convenient".

Convenience is a selfish pursuit, and usually no one thinks of how convenient things are on the receiving end.

Phone calls and knocking on doors are ALWAYS intrusions on the part of the person initiating contact. That doesn't mean they're unwanted or unwelcome, just that they are unanticipated points of entry into the routine of someone else which will alter that routine. They should be treated accordingly.

If the intrusion is welcome, then the person on the receiving end has the right to accept the connection. If the intrusion is unwelcome, then the person on the receiving end is not rude for refusing to alter their routine to accommodate someone else. Rude is believing that whatever you have to say is automatically more important than the activities or business already being conducted.

(And that doesn't even take into consideration the people who send an e-mail, then call five minutes later to see if you've gotten it and ask why you haven't answered yet.)

Phaeal
08-27-2010, 09:21 PM
I put on my big noice-blocking headphones and play the writing music of the moment (currently Trombone Shorty, Backatown.) While I'm writing, I'll only answer the phone if the area code is 212. ;)

Namatu
08-27-2010, 09:40 PM
i do that if someone is selling door to door. they sometimes say something loud enough for me to hear..."aren't you going to answer your door?" "No." "That's rude." "NO...rude is when someone you don't want on your doorstep is on your doorstep. Ruder is when they don't take the hint and leave." conversations of the like are quite common. they really cannot believe that people won't answer their door. i love the comment, "You mean you don't want to save money..." "that's exactly what i mean, yes."I have these conversations with telemarketers or with the companies that send me catalogs in the mail. They're always so very surprised that I don't want their junk, even if it includes a free subscription. Ooh, free! :rolleyes:

scarletpeaches
08-27-2010, 09:43 PM
I've stopped answering my phone unless it's a number already in my phone book. A week or two back I was waiting on the call saying my ereader had been repaired, so picked up. Bah. Salesman from my mobile phone company trying to get me to agree to a FREE landline, FREE for 3 months, then NEARLY FREE MUCH CHEAPNESS.

It took nearly twenty minutes of me saying "No, I wouldn't use it," to get rid.

Of course, then they try the "What about other people in your household?" thing. "I live on my own."

"What about talking to your friends?"

"My friends email."

"Would you like a faster broadband connec-"

"No."

Happens again, I'm just hanging up.

kuwisdelu
08-27-2010, 09:49 PM
Happens again, I'm just hanging up.

I generally do that as soon as I can tell what it is. Which is usually in the middle of the first couple words.

katiemac
08-27-2010, 10:01 PM
I've been thinking about this phone issue most of the day - maybe it's on my mind because just about everyone has a mobile and is therefore reachable almost all of the time. Seeing myself from someone else's POV, maybe it does seem odd that I'm willingly unreachable.

Still not turning my phone on when I'm writing, though.

Just because you can be always reachable doesn't mean you have to be. My friends know there's always an excellent chance I'm not going to answer the phone, to the point they're surprised when I answer. They also know not to leave voicemails because I won't listen to them. Text messages are the way to go, unless it's urgent so the phone call is warranted.

Rhoda Nightingale
08-27-2010, 10:40 PM
I generally do that as soon as I can tell what it is. Which is usually in the middle of the first couple words.
Yeah, that's how I am too. They don't get to the arguing stages with me. Perhaps a curt, "No thank you," but that's all. That has nothing to do with my writing, though.

I tend to get into a "zone" when I'm writing. It doesn't matter what else is going on around me--I can't see or hear anything in the outside world. However, if someone tries to break into that zone, I get angry. A couple of times I've had my laptop with me on my break at work, and people have tried to come "hang out" with me during that time. I can handle a compulsory, "Hey, how's it goin" no problem. But if they try to engage me in conversation, all that goes through my head is, "I'm losing it, I'm losing it! I had that word a second ago! WHY'D YOU HAVE TO INTERRUPT ME!!?" One girl, I actually had to say, "Look, I'm trying to edit a novel here. This is NOT a good time to talk to me. Please go away." She got all huffy and offended, but that ain't my problem.

I'm antisocial at the best of times. When writing, a thousand times more so.

Cyia
08-27-2010, 10:58 PM
I generally do that as soon as I can tell what it is. Which is usually in the middle of the first couple words.

Ditto.

Them: Hi, I'd like to take a few moments-
Me: No, thanks. *click*


Yeah, that's how I am too. They don't get to the arguing stages with me. Perhaps a curt, "No thank you," but that's all. That has nothing to do with my writing, though.

I tend to get into a "zone" when I'm writing. It doesn't matter what else is going on around me--I can't see or hear anything in the outside world. However, if someone tries to break into that zone, I get angry. A couple of times I've had my laptop with me on my break at work, and people have tried to come "hang out" with me during that time. I can handle a compulsory, "Hey, how's it goin" no problem. But if they try to engage me in conversation, all that goes through my head is, "I'm losing it, I'm losing it! I had that word a second ago! WHY'D YOU HAVE TO INTERRUPT ME!!?" One girl, I actually had to say, "Look, I'm trying to edit a novel here. This is NOT a good time to talk to me. Please go away." She got all huffy and offended, but that ain't my problem.

I'm antisocial at the best of times. When writing, a thousand times more so.

Double ditto.

This is exactly how I am, and I can't stand it when people come up and act like they're doing you a favor by engaging you in conversation - or worse, they keep ASKING YOU THINGS.

The other day, I was on my laptop and one person kept asking me to spell things for them. I wanted to pull their hair out by the roots. My brain would get pleasantly settled, then "How do you spell burrito?"

I spelled burrito.

Then, I'd get to the edge of the zone. "How do you spell tortilla?"

I spelled tortilla.

Almost there...

"How do you spell nachos? Plural."

I spelled nachos, plural, and growled a bit.

"I'm sorry! *wait for it* How do you spell queso?"

"AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!"

This was not a child, and was, in fact, someone who teaches them. She was making a poster to sign-up for a first of the year taco party. And there was a dictionary in the house.

I thought it was over, then:

"Is it queso or queso cheese?"

I lost it. I started in on a rant about how queso was cheese and you don't go around saying you're bringing cheese cheese.

In fact, if I'd had access to sufficient quantities of queso, said person would have been plunked head first into a vat of it.

Shadow_Ferret
08-27-2010, 11:01 PM
My laptop is on a TV table in the living room while my wife and/or son is watching TV. She's on her laptop,sometimes, playing her Bejeweled Blitz, from which she can't be disturbed (at least during the minute she's actively playing). So even if I'm writing, she's no help, so I end up having to let the dogs out, let the dogs back in, attend to the children's needs, answer the phone, and everything else.

Between that, I write.

Rhoda Nightingale
08-27-2010, 11:07 PM
@Cyia: LOL--fantastic. I've had the following conversation more times than I care to remember:

"Hey, watcha workin' on?"

...Writing.

"Is that for school?"

No, it's a novel.

"Neat! What's it about?"

*grits teeth* Vampires.

"Oh, so it's like Twilight?"

NO IT'S NOT LIKE FRAKKING TWILIGHT!!!!

And then, not as often, but still:

"I had an idea for a book once, do you think maybe if you wrote it--"

NO.

scarletpeaches
08-27-2010, 11:10 PM
"Whatcha doing?"

"Working."

"What on?"

"A book."

"Can I-?"

"No you can't be in it. No you can't read it. No you can't have a free copy when it's published. Yes, I'm pissed off. LEAVE. ME. ALONE."

GRARGH!

All of the above was worse when I was blonde for some reason. Maybe now I'm a brunette again I'm less attractive. Or maybe when I had highlights I just looked too vacant to be able to operate a netbook without some well-meaning twunt interrupting me to 'help'.

AlexPiper
08-27-2010, 11:17 PM
Phones are supposed to serve you, not summon you.

My roommate has observed that I have an almost pavlovian response to my phone when away from my desk; it rings and I curse before I answer it, without even realizing I'm doing so. (*ringring* "Oh, for the love of... hello?")

That said, although I usually am available via phone or IM (as background, my day job involves writing mobile messaging tools), there are two times I really 'unplug.' One is when I'm at the stables. If I'm with my horse, the phone will be in the car; my time with Debutanté is sacrosanct and will not be disrupted. The other is when I'm writing. I just silence the phone and go to work.

scarletpeaches
08-27-2010, 11:21 PM
A friend asked me, "But what if I need to get in touch with you?"

What are you supposed to say to that? "Send an email."

"I don't have a computer."

"Leave a voicemail."

"What if you don't pick it up for hours?"

"Then I don't pick it up for hours."

Sheesh.

If it's not death or fire, it can wait.

DancingMaenid
08-27-2010, 11:50 PM
I've been thinking about this phone issue most of the day - maybe it's on my mind because just about everyone has a mobile and is therefore reachable almost all of the time. Seeing myself from someone else's POV, maybe it does seem odd that I'm willingly unreachable.

Still not turning my phone on when I'm writing, though.

I don't turn my mobile on at all unless I need to use it or think someone may try to reach me on it. It's just for emergencies or situations where it might come in handy. I have a land line people can leave messages to, and I really don't want to be constantly reachable by phone.

BrooklynLee
08-28-2010, 12:15 AM
I have a young daughter, so I'm used to writing in loud places (you'd be amazed at how much writing I've gotten done sitting on benches in playgrounds). At home, given the choice, I'd prefer to be alone but as my desk is in our main living area that doesn't happen as much as I'd like. Still, I try to block out distractions as much as I can. I spent years working as a journalist though, and I feel like if you can write in a newsroom you can write almost anywhere.

Tepelus
08-28-2010, 05:52 AM
Nobody calls me so the phone is never a problem.

Jessianodel
08-28-2010, 06:13 AM
I have no personal writing area in my house, so I'm constantly interrupted for various questions/orders. It's annoying. Really annoying. But then of course everyone gets all affronted when I act frustrated because they don't get it.

I can zone if it's an interesting part. If not, it tends to take a lot longer.

StandJustSo
08-28-2010, 11:04 AM
I can focus on what I'm doing to the point the rest of the world goes away. If I'm the only one home, I almost never have the TV on, so the house is quiet. I don't listen to music hardly at all, and I don't get a lot of phone calls, so I tend to not have a lot of those distractions.

Now, my Basset hound will tend to interrupt my train of thought. She will need to go out, then come back in, or she wants to play, or she wants some attention, etc., and that can get annoying, but for the most part, if I just dedicate myself to writing, I get lost in it, and all is right and happy with my life.

shaldna
08-28-2010, 12:10 PM
if i write during the day then it's usualyl in a busy place, at home though I only write then the kiddies are in bed, so silence isn't realyl an issue. although I do need some noise in teh background

not_HarryS
08-28-2010, 01:43 PM
I need activity and conversation around me to be able to focus on my work, but I don't want ANY of that activity/conversation to be directed at me or involve me in any way whatsoever.

I have this coworker who loves to come into my cubicle, look at my screen, and then sit at a chair in front of my desk waiting for me to engage him in conversation. His sitting there NOT talking is more distracting than talking, so I usually bite and try to be polite for like... 30 seconds. But if it lasts longer than that and he still doesn't leave, I get rude. Sometimes yell. Sometimes stand up, point at his chest and scream for him to get the fuck away from my desk when I'm working. And he always comes back in spite of how much of a prickly asshole I am when I'm trying to concentrate on something.

Haha. As for phones, my ringer is always off and I never turn on vibrate. In China, though, because there are no answering machines, it's like a mortal fucking sin to not answer your phone. If you don't answer, the person will keep on calling and calling until you do, even if it's not an important call.

An interesting phenomenon: because they have this stigma against not answering phones, if you're in a fight with someone and they get so angry that they hang up on you, you can immediately call them back and they will ANSWER AGAIN. It blows my mind. Haha. Seen it happen a ton of times and it's still hilarious.

seun
08-28-2010, 02:17 PM
I've stopped answering my phone unless it's a number already in my phone book. A week or two back I was waiting on the call saying my ereader had been repaired, so picked up. Bah. Salesman from my mobile phone company trying to get me to agree to a FREE landline, FREE for 3 months, then NEARLY FREE MUCH CHEAPNESS.

It took nearly twenty minutes of me saying "No, I wouldn't use it," to get rid.


I had a similar conversation with a rep for a well known cable TV supplier. They phoned to see if I wanted to take out their Sports and Films package. I declined on the basis I don't care about sports (true) and I don't watch films. (A lie, but I get my films from work or buy them). The rep acted as if I was a complete idiot for not being into sports or films. I let him talk for another ten seconds, told him I didn't appreciate being spoken to like that and hung up.

Mr Flibble
08-28-2010, 03:38 PM
It took nearly twenty minutes of me saying "No, I wouldn't use it," to get rid.

We're ex-directory, how did you get this number? You shouldn't be using it. Please remove me from your database before I...Hello?? Oh they've gone :D


I can't write with the kids about or someone else watching tv in the room. I need no interruptions. I regularly tell my husband to 'sod off down the pub will you?'

KyraDune
08-28-2010, 05:50 PM
In my house it goes like this . . .

I turn the music up to drown loud tv and louder arguments. I sit down, the words start to flow.

Knock on the door.

"Come in." Silence. I grit my teeth. "Come in." More silence. I sigh, I get up, I open my door. "What?"

"Where's the parmesan cheese?"

I don't eat parmesan cheese, but I find it anyway. Back to writing. Ten minutes later someone calls my name. Up I get again. "What?"

"Bring me my phone." I stare at the phone, which sits about a foot away from the person on the couch. I get the phone. I go back to writing.

Knock on the door. I growl. "Come in."

"What are you doing?"

"Writing."

"Oh. So you're not doing anything important, then. Come look at (insert something I have no interest in)."

Isn't family great?

scarletpeaches
08-28-2010, 06:56 PM
We're ex-directory, how did you get this number? You shouldn't be using it. Please remove me from your database before I...Hello?? Oh they've gone :D


I can't write with the kids about or someone else watching tv in the room. I need no interruptions. I regularly tell my husband to 'sod off down the pub will you?'It was my mobile phone/cable TV/broadband supplier. The one company guaranteed to have my phone number.

A_Napp
08-28-2010, 07:01 PM
Hm... I write everywhere and always...train, bus, during meetings, restaurants, toilets...I wrote at school, when I still was, and when I could not write literally, I laid the sentences out in my head for later. But I prefer silence around, when it gets to difficult scenes.
If there's an idea which has to come out, it has to ;) no matter where I am.

Mr Flibble
08-28-2010, 07:04 PM
It was my mobile phone/cable TV/broadband supplier. The one company guaranteed to have my phone number.

/derail

Ah. In that case I sympathise. I always get the Old Man to tell them a short, pithy phrase ending in 'off'. Seems to work quite well. Man the Red Cross though...they keep ringing (because I'm a subscriber) asking for more money. I keep telling them I have an allocated amount for charity. If I give them more, I deny other charities. Red Cross? 'Give more money or 'Insert guilt trip here'' and they won't take no for an answer. Well for about half an hour anyway. I don't like to swear at charities...But they do it one more time I'm going to find a different charity to donate to.

/end derail

I have been known to swear at people interrupting my writing too.

ishtar'sgate
08-28-2010, 07:10 PM
When writing, how closed off are you? Are we talking door shut, phone off while you're focused on what you're writing? Or are you still OK to talk to the outside world?


I don't like to lose focus when I'm deeply into my writing so yes, I ignore the phone and let it go to voicemail. The only time I'll answer it is if I'm thrashing around not getting anywhere with a sentence or scene. Then the break is welcome. I also usually close the door so I don't hear the television or people talking. It's too distracting for me because I always want to know what's going on if I hear voices.

seun
08-28-2010, 07:39 PM
A wonderful example of an interruption today: my sister turned up with two of her kids. I've been working on an idea for a short story for the last couple of days and she arrived literally thirty seconds after I worked out how to start this short.

Not chuffed.

shaldna
08-28-2010, 08:35 PM
You guys are all more polite than I am when it comes to cold callers. I just put the phone down. Rude I know, but 9 times out of ten the person on teh other end misprounces my name, and it's just downhill from there

Bekah
08-28-2010, 08:40 PM
I answer the phone for one person, and only if I'm not working. Everyone else hates the phone as much as I do, and sends an email. If one of them called, I'd answer, as it would be an emergency.

E. S. Lark
08-31-2010, 12:55 AM
During the day, I only answer the phone if it's immediate family. I got a cold call once from comcast who does our internet so I answered. It was a sales pitch.

A few weeks ago, someone came knocking at our door, really light knocks. I waited 5 minutes, and the person was still knocking. Thinking it was my other half's family, I opened it. A woman stood there asking if she could talk to me about family values. I gave a quick "no thanks" and shut the door.

At night, if the phone rings, Jamie will get it. I pretty much stop writing at this point as it's usually for me. I can generally drown everything out, but if anyone tries to have a conversation with me .... I lose it, especially during edits. I can answer maybe 3-4 short questions before I start ranting.

quicklime
08-31-2010, 12:58 AM
I'm lucky in that I can do a fair amount of writing during work...less lucky in that anytime the phone rings I can't play "sorry, do not disturb" or I will join the ranks of the unemployed. My door is stuck semi-open then.....

Cella
08-31-2010, 01:00 AM
I can't have any distractions if I want to get any writing done. No phone, people in the background...nothin'.

Terzi McJoy
08-31-2010, 02:46 AM
Because I live alone, when I write, I generally don't have many distractions. Empty stomach and calls are the only thing that can get me out of my typing trance.

Then there's visits from me social worker. :Shrug:

Ruth2
08-31-2010, 03:09 AM
I used to write in an upstairs bedroom. My office, I called it. Hubby got upset because I was up there so much. So I moved it down to the bedroom. But.. hubby couldn't go to sleep because I wasn't in bed next to him. Soooo.. I moved it out to the dining room table. Hubby sits across from me, stares at me. Natters at me. Sighs. I look at him. "What?" Nothing. I smile. "I'm trying to write." Hubby pouts. Goes to watch tv. Sulks because I don't want to watch tv. I keep on writing.

Mr Flibble
08-31-2010, 03:19 AM
. Hubby sits across from me, stares at me. Natters at me. Sighs. I look at him. "What?" Nothing. I smile. "I'm trying to write." Hubby pouts. Goes to watch tv. Sulks because I don't want to watch tv. I keep on writing.

This is why I tell him to sod off to the pub (or buy him a new computer game)


Men, bless their little hearts. They act so tough....