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sunaynaprasad
08-24-2010, 11:31 PM
I want to get my book in major chains. But on the other hand, I don't want movie rights sold to my book. What publishers distribute to major chains, accept unagented manuscripts, and similtaneous submissions? Also my book's genre is a contemporary fantasy aimed for middle and high school readers. It's short, only 30, 500 words (approximately, but I think it's a little more). I'm worried that if I get an agent, and my book is good enough for a major publishing house (i.e Simon & Schuster), it may turn into a movie at some point. I'm okay with my book being translated into a foreign language or turned into an audiobook. But a movie will spoil my imagination in a huge way. I'd love to get famous, but not too famous. Can anyone think of publishers that accept what I said above, and are not scam publishers? Tate, American Book, and PublishAmerica say they distribute books to major chains, but are no good. What else is there? I need a bunch of ideas because I know I will get rejected several times (like all authors; even the best ones).

ether
08-24-2010, 11:36 PM
I'm no expert on this, so others can offer a better insight, I'm sure.

Agents work on negotiating contracts. It's part of what they do for the author. If you're querying to agents, don't mention something like this right away because it's kind of jumping the gun. Worry about it after your agented. This, I would think, is something your agent would work out with anyone interested in the movie rights.

Submitting directly to publishers and getting accepted is possible, but much more difficult than landing an agent. Your MS is also incredibly short for Young Adult, so it's going to be a hard sell.

jennontheisland
08-24-2010, 11:44 PM
I want to get my book in major chains. But on the other hand, I don't want movie rights sold to my book. What publishers distribute to major chains, accept unagented manuscripts, and similtaneous submissions?

Whoa. Um, hi.

What you're asking is for other people to do your research and tell you what they find. It's not likely to happen.

Go to the bookstore and find books like yours. Same genre, same length, same target audience. THose are the publishers you want to target. If they require agents, well, you're just going to have to get one, aren't you.



I'm worried that if I get an agent, and my book is good enough for a major publishing house (i.e Simon & Schuster), it may turn into a movie at some point. I'm okay with my book being translated into a foreign language or turned into an audiobook. But a movie will spoil my imagination in a huge way. I'd love to get famous, but not too famous.
Oh look, there's a cart in front of that horse.

You don't have to sell any rights you don't want to, but I don't see how a movie will kill *your* imagination. No one's going to strap you to a chair and force you to watch it.

Worry about finding a publisher or agent and then worry about how "famous" you plan on getting.

ResearchGuy
08-25-2010, 12:00 AM
I want to get my book in major chains. . . . .
See www.umbachconsulting.com/pursuit.pdf (http://www.umbachconsulting.com/pursuit.pdf) -- read it, do the homework in it (pretty much what jennontheisland advised), and consult the references cited. The booklet is short and will help you know what questions to ask and where to find answers.

--Ken

quicklime
08-25-2010, 12:02 AM
I want to get my book in major chains. But on the other hand, I don't want movie rights sold to my book. What publishers distribute to major chains, accept unagented manuscripts, and similtaneous submissions? Also my book's genre is a contemporary fantasy aimed for middle and high school readers. It's short, only 30, 500 words (approximately, but I think it's a little more). I'm worried that if I get an agent, and my book is good enough for a major publishing house (i.e Simon & Schuster), it may turn into a movie at some point. I'm okay with my book being translated into a foreign language or turned into an audiobook. But a movie will spoil my imagination in a huge way. I'd love to get famous, but not too famous. Can anyone think of publishers that accept what I said above, and are not scam publishers? Tate, American Book, and PublishAmerica say they distribute books to major chains, but are no good. What else is there? I need a bunch of ideas because I know I will get rejected several times (like all authors; even the best ones).



Hi, and welcome to the board.

That being said, you're getting WAY ahead of yourself.....like, buying dentures for a four-year-old ahead. You've got a lot of research to do to get a feel for what you're even asking here, and what you SHOULD be asking.

I'll start with a brief outline:
First, you try to get an agent. Or you sub without an agent. That's a whole pissing match of it's own here, but in general, major houses do not look at unagented subs or if they do your wait is very, very long. Want distribution? You need a major house. Getting an agent is it's own issue, and agent or no, you need to work on a query letter.

Once you have a query that will get you an agent, or that you are subbing to publishers, nobody I am aware of REQUIRES you sell movie rights. And if they want, you negotiate. as far a s a movie spoiling your imagination, I think that might be a stretch, but it's your book. First you need to get it someplace though.

As far as getting it someplace, and all authors being rejected a time or two, here's a very brief reality check:

gone with the wind was rejected by several dozen publishers. DOZEN.

john saul published his seventh book.

the average agent gets several thousand queries a year and takes on maybe a couple dozen scripts...generally less. Houses get even more subs, and take very few titles.



I do not mean to rain on your parade, but I think you are going to find out writing a book is barely the beginning. Best of luck to you, but I highly recommend you check the site out in detail; there's lots of info here to help you get your footing.

Quick

quicklime
08-25-2010, 12:03 AM
jenna beat me :-(

Sheryl Nantus
08-25-2010, 12:40 AM
I'm assuming you mean 30,000 words or 50,000 words, not just 30 and 500.

Go do your research and keep writing.

jvc
08-25-2010, 03:41 AM
Greetings and welcome to the watercooler :welcome:

Take a wander around the various forums, there's lots to see and lots to learn, and even some fun threads too. Come along and pop on over to the Traditional Irish Pub (at the top of the Newbie forum) and say hi, there's plenty of friendly faces that you can chat with and lots of banter. There's also the Question of the Day threads at the top of the Newbie forum where you can answer random questions.

Don't forget to read the newbie guide (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66315), and if you want to know what all the buttons mean check out this thread. (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=28185)

CACTUSWENDY
08-25-2010, 05:10 AM
Welcome to AW. Hope you enjoy your stay with us.
How do you like your popcorn?

If you go to the bottom of the page to the ‘forum jump’ you can scroll down and find all the areas of this place. Most of the SYW areas require the password of ….vista. Good luck.

Silver King
08-25-2010, 06:23 AM
I want to get my book in major chains. But on the other hand, I don't want movie rights sold to my book...
If that's the case, then negotiate with your agent to withhold film rights to your work.

It's that simple. And be sure to tell potential agents right off the bat, in your query letter preferably, that you deny your work to be ever denigrated to film.

They'll understand your position and move forward accordingly.

regdog
08-25-2010, 02:16 PM
sunayn, I'm going to move your post to FAQ's.

This is your third post about finding a publisher. Several AWers have given you sound advice about the steps it takes to become published.

sunaynaprasad
11-05-2010, 05:27 AM
Somebody told me that authors can have control over their books being turned into movies (ie. controling casting and script writing) if arranged properly. I never wanted my book (which is in the publishing process) into a movie because of all the changes made. However, if I got control over what's done for the movie, I may change my mind. Is that really possible?

suki
11-05-2010, 05:29 AM
Somebody told me that authors can have control over their books being turned into movies (ie. controling casting and script writing) if arranged properly. I never wanted my book (which is in the publishing process) into a movie because of all the changes made. However, if I got control over what's done for the movie, I may change my mind. Is that really possible?

Actually, very unlikely unless you are a very powerful author.

But, you can discuss with your agent trying to draft such a clause, but, to be honest, it's unlikely for movie rights to sell if you require such control - so, you won't have to worry about it being changed ;)

What you do need to do is retain movie rights, instead of selling them to the publisher, so that you can decide whether to sell them later.

~suki

BenPanced
11-05-2010, 05:37 AM
Especially if it's your first novel.

Mac H.
11-05-2010, 01:12 PM
However, if I got control over what's done for the movie, I may change my mind. Is that really possible?Unless you finance the movie yourself you will never get final control.

That's just the reality of handling a multi-million dollar investment.

Mac

MissMacchiato
11-05-2010, 01:20 PM
I think JK Rowling had quite a bit of control over the first HP movie.
.
.
.
.
But she's JKR.

rainsmom
11-05-2010, 09:55 PM
Highly unlikely you'd have any control. You can always attempt to negotiate, but once Hollywood buys something, they own it. They can put in green clows , UFO, and purple dinosaurs if they want.

BUT... look at it this way. You wrote the book, and it's on shelves. If the movie sucks, you say, "Hollywood. They screwed it up. Read my fabulous novel. I had nothing to do with the movie." If the movie is awesome, you take full credit! Regardless, you make more money than you EVER made from the novel.

Jamesaritchie
11-05-2010, 11:53 PM
I want to get my book in major chains. But on the other hand, I don't want movie rights sold to my book. What publishers distribute to major chains, accept unagented manuscripts, and similtaneous submissions? Also my book's genre is a contemporary fantasy aimed for middle and high school readers. It's short, only 30, 500 words (approximately, but I think it's a little more). I'm worried that if I get an agent, and my book is good enough for a major publishing house (i.e Simon & Schuster), it may turn into a movie at some point. I'm okay with my book being translated into a foreign language or turned into an audiobook. But a movie will spoil my imagination in a huge way. I'd love to get famous, but not too famous. Can anyone think of publishers that accept what I said above, and are not scam publishers? Tate, American Book, and PublishAmerica say they distribute books to major chains, but are no good. What else is there? I need a bunch of ideas because I know I will get rejected several times (like all authors; even the best ones).

Your book doesn't have to be published by a major publisher to be turned into a movie. And how would a movie spoil your imagination? The book comes first, and will certainly be out for a long while before any movie is made. If one ever is.

Movies and books are very different things, and no matter what is done with or to the movie, your book will remain unchanged.

And, no, you won't get control over the movie unless you pay for the movie, but why would you want it? It's just a movie, and really has nothing at all to do with the book.

You can certainly sell a novel without an agent, but forget the simultaneous submissions, except at the query stage.

Get an agent and stop worrying abut movie rights, something that will probably never, ever happen to your book. And if someone does want movie rights, sell them. Not a word in your book will be changed.

I understand not wanting to be too famous, but life doesn't really work this way. Either you write books good enough to make millions of readers beg for them, or you don't.

Cathy C
11-06-2010, 12:05 AM
I write fantasy for Tor Books, who accepted unagented manuscripts and have kept all my movie rights. So it's entirely possible . . . but I highly recommend a good agent even though it's not required to be bought by Tor or some others. There a hundred more rights you don't even know exist right now and you may or may not want to keep those too.

Trust me--the agent is the way to go.

As the others have said, concentrate on THAT first and the rest will follow. :)

marlonpierreantoine
11-06-2010, 03:33 AM
I have to slightly, but not really, disagree with the majority opinion on this thread. I think that envisioning yourself as a successful author is important - critical, even, in the hurdle to getting your first novel written and edited, then wading through the nearly-inevitable rejections until you hear that magic word "yes."

However, I don't know of a single major publisher with great placement AND accepting of unagented subs AND takes simul-subs. There are a few big pubs that take unagented subs - for you, in YA, I know of Flux, Penguin Razorbill, and possibly Random House UK.

But you are getting ahead of yourself. I think setting a cap on how famous you want to get is premature at this point. Is there any way you can lengthen your book? Don't pad it, I mean, I've read books with obvious filler and skipping big swaths of pages is not what you want your readers to do if you ever intend to write a second book, but that word-count seems awfully low.

Cathy C
11-07-2010, 03:29 AM
Um... whoa, whoa! Before anyone takes any more swipes at the OP for thinking about this stuff, this is EXACTLY the stuff people should be thinking about. Yes, it's all about the book. Great, fine. But it's also about the myriad of other rights that accompany the books. My current contract with Macmillan (Tor is one of the imprints), which is one of the six major publishers in the world (and yes, DOES still accepted sim-sub, unagented slush), is 36 pages long and has taken the full past year to negotiate.

If the OP wants to think about the movie because that's how s/he thinks in terms of writing a book (and I know, because I write "visually" in the form of a movie) then nifty.

It's all part of the business, and a very important part of the business. So we all need to be careful not to poo-poo a person's concerns. They're valid and should be encouraged so we can have a serious discussion about stuff like this.

In other words, ignore the sub rights at your own peril. Even during the writing process.

ResearchGuy
11-07-2010, 03:48 AM
. . .this is EXACTLY the stuff people should be thinking about. . . . .
IMHO, it is grossly premature. First interest an agent. Then let the agent interest a publisher. Then discuss contract details with the agent. If contract is first offered by a publisher that takes direct queries/proposals, fine -- THEN sign with an agent to negotiate the contract. But obsessing about details of movie rights when the book has not yet drawn any interest from a publisher seems . . . self-defeating.

--Ken

Cathy C
11-08-2010, 12:02 AM
But if the worry about an issue is distracting . . . keeping the author from writing, then it's a reasonable question to pose. It's a simple answer and has been answered. I thought about all sorts of weird stuff while I was writing my first one. Stuff that wouldn't come up until much later. I even hired an entertainment attorney to get some of the questions answered so I could focus. It's all about focus and when that's at stake, there's no question that's too premature to ask, IMHO. :)

ResearchGuy
11-08-2010, 02:50 AM
. . . there's no question that's too premature to ask, IMHO. :)
Well, with all due respect, I think that asking however one will manage to invest the six- or seven-figure advance and the cash that will cascade in from subsidiary rights is premature, as is obsessing over subsidiary rights for an unsold manuscript. Just concentrate on writing.

--Ken

Anne Lyle
12-02-2010, 07:40 PM
At the risk of muddying the waters: IIRC, movie rights are generally acquired on an "option" basis, i.e. for a set number of years, after which the rights return to the author (and can potentially be sold again). Many, many novels get optioned for movie adaptations that never get made - the author gets a fat check, without all the hassle of fame :)

Of course if the rights are optioned, you then risk the movie being produced and you have little or no say in how good or bad it is going to be. But as said above, no-one can force you to hand over those rights, so really it's not worth stressing over. Write a great book, research the process of submitting to agents here and elsewhere on this fine thing we call the Internet, and most of all - good luck!

8thSamurai
12-03-2010, 12:05 AM
Many options never lead to fruit, and you certainly don't have to take them.

Most books don't get that kind of attention at all, so there's two reasons not to worry about it.

shaldna
12-03-2010, 03:00 PM
As everyone else said, you#re getting a little ahead of yourself here. Even if your book is finished and ready to query now, it's still likely to be at least two years before you see your book on a shelf, and that's if you are lucky. Many first (and second and twenty third) books never.

Don't write with the notion of being famous, that's a road that's gonna end in disapointment. There are literally millions of published writers out there, and I could pick out maybe a dozen in the street, and I could name a couple of hundred that I like, but I can virtually guarentee that the ones I like are not the same as the next bloke.

Writers don't generally become 'famous' what most of us want as a writer is to be respected.

Lavinia
12-04-2010, 01:25 AM
Visualize yourself being successful in every way - but be willing to work very hard.

Become a student of anything you need to learn.

Write because it is a story that must be told.

Pray for sunshine but bring an umbrella.

Writing is work. There aren't any shortcuts.

And it's not just about the writing. Immerse yourself in all things publishing.

Keep your passion AND work hard. ~Karen