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Ray1942
08-18-2010, 03:29 PM
Does anyone have any experience with story development software such as StoryWeaver and/or Dramatica?

I recently purchased StoryWeaver and am having a devil of a time trying to develop a story using the product.

I'd like to hear from anyone who has successfully used the product to develop a story.

BlueWolf
08-18-2010, 03:53 PM
I actually use 'Myself v.1.02' (1.0 and 1.01 both crashed after too much beer), with the add-on package 'Suggestions from the missus v.1.0' (the definitive program).

regdog
08-18-2010, 04:41 PM
Ray, I'm going to check what Forum to move your question so you get the best answer

Moving to Tech Help

flyingtart
08-18-2010, 06:58 PM
I've recently been trying Contour (http://www.marinersoftware.com/products/contour/). It's really for screenwriting but you can use it for novels too. It's user friendly and not too jargon-laden unlike Dramatica. I've read Blake Snyder's Save the Cat and wondered if his software would be better but haven't tried it so far.

RJK
08-18-2010, 07:10 PM
You will probably get more out of Storyweaver if you first read The Hero's Journey (http://www.amazon.com/Heros-Journey-Joseph-Campbell-Works/dp/1577314042/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1282144070&sr=1-1) by Joseph Campbell. The methodology behind the software is based on his theories.

Margarita Skies
08-18-2010, 10:35 PM
I don't use story-writing software, but I've heard wonderful things about yWriter. It's especially for novels I think.

Tirjasdyn
08-19-2010, 12:02 AM
I don't use story-writing software, but I've heard wonderful things about yWriter. It's especially for novels I think.

That's what I use. It organizes chapters into scenes and keeps track of stuff you put in. It's free and written by a novelist.

Storyweaver encourages you to writer along the lines of a formula, in this case the hero's journey (though I think it has some other ones, could be wrong). It's basically a help file with instructions, an electronic version of a how to write a novel book and workbook.

The question cards have a panel you can write the answers to the questions in. At the end of each section you put it all together. Keep answering the questions until you go through the entire process.

Jamesaritchie
08-19-2010, 02:12 AM
I've yet to find anyone who has successfully used story developing software for novels or short stories.

Drice
08-19-2010, 03:00 AM
I actually use 'Myself v.1.02' (1.0 and 1.01 both crashed after too much beer), with the add-on package 'Suggestions from the missus v.1.0' (the definitive program).

I actually use the original version... Myself v1.0... I have no idea where you found the updates... Yes, there are bugs but I find it so rewarding to write around them.

The use of software that prompts one to write to a formula send shudders down my something... Oh yeah... my spine... the very thought creeps me out...

On the other hand if anybody comes across a Gizmo and some Software that lets me scan some of the great scenery up here in Algonquin Park and outputs using an Oil-Paint-Jet-Printer Thingy that lets my visions become works of art like the Group of Seven... then... maybe...


I dunno... sorry for the rant...

cbenoi1
08-19-2010, 03:35 AM
> Does anyone have any experience with story development
> software such as StoryWeaver and/or Dramatica?

I use Dramatica to build characters. If you follow the StoryGuide process, it will create characters at odds with each other. This creates a lot of tension and conflict opportunities and you should never run out of tension and/or conflict in a story. Dramatica has its own terminology, which becomes clear once you read "A New Theory Of Story" from M-A Philips and C Huntley (it's on the Dramatica web site as a big PDF file).

-cb

GothamGal
04-29-2011, 03:36 AM
> Does anyone have any experience with story development
> software such as StoryWeaver and/or Dramatica?

I use Dramatica to build characters. If you follow the StoryGuide process, it will create characters at odds with each other. This creates a lot of tension and conflict opportunities and you should never run out of tension and/or conflict in a story. Dramatica has its own terminology, which becomes clear once you read "A New Theory Of Story" from M-A Philips and C Huntley (it's on the Dramatica web site as a big PDF file).

-cb

I get so bogged down with the amount of questions, I feel like i have to have the story already written before I can answer the questions in Dramatica, which I'm very sad about because I just got it and really wanted to use it more.

FOTSGreg
04-29-2011, 07:06 AM
I've tried using Dramatica and several other pieces of software that supposedly are designed to help the writer develop and write their story.

Sadly, the only useful one I've found is iCard Sort for the iPad which emulates a 3x5 card outline system.

There is no substitute for placing the seat of your pants against the seat of the chair and just writing.

I know that seems harsh, but the only thing all that software does is cause money to flow away from the author.

There is no easy way.

If you have a computer and a copy of Notepad you already have everything you need to write (except maybe for a dictionary and a copy of Strunck & White).

Medievalist
04-29-2011, 07:26 AM
See also:

Story Mill and Scrivener and Y-Writer and others.

ejket
04-30-2011, 09:48 PM
I use creative writing software
What software in particular?

entropic island
04-30-2011, 09:52 PM
Liquid Binder helps if your organized.

But organization is key. That's why I use Word. :P

bglashbrooks
05-06-2011, 05:28 AM
I really like the yWriter program. I don't use it for regular draft writing, though I definitely could. I use it more for later revisions; it allows you to analyze things like who has the most POV scenes, automatically counts the words in each chapter, lets you name the scenes for easy outlining and provides a tool to facilitate synopsis writing.
AND....it's absolutely free.

I have focus issues and this helps me really polish my works. I usually load all my work into the program once I've finished the first draft. I do most of my editing in the yWriter.

But like was mentioned before, the best way to write a book is to just sit down and write. The only software you need for that is a word processing one.

graceangela9
05-31-2011, 01:12 PM
I use Power structure and This is an all-in-one writing environment with built-in word processor that helps you organize and cross-reference your story development materials.Power Structure is designed to help me use my existing skills as a writer to tell these stories better, and to give me tools to help me discover my own weaknesses as a writer and overcome them myself.

darnzen
11-12-2011, 03:49 AM
yWriter is good if you want to outline and write and keep notes on characters and such all in the same place.

Personally, I prefer something like WriteMonkey (http://writemonkey.com). It's minimalist, but not quite as minimalist as darkroom (http://they.misled.us/dark-room). Both of these try to recreate the psychological atmosphere that made writing on a typewriter so productive (for those of use that remember).

uncommonspirit
01-18-2012, 01:27 AM
Does anyone have any experience with story development software such as StoryWeaver and/or Dramatica?

I recently purchased StoryWeaver and am having a devil of a time trying to develop a story using the product.

I'd like to hear from anyone who has successfully used the product to develop a story.

I've used Dramatica, but in the end I discarded it. I bought their book to try and learn all the terminology, listened to their writing podcasts (which I did enjoy) and in the end found it to hamper my writing instead of encourage it. The program I now use is Scrivener and I absolutely love it.

robjvargas
01-18-2012, 03:41 AM
FYI, there's been some discussion of this before.

<LINK> (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=229696&highlight=Scrivener)

punahougirl84
05-24-2012, 02:00 AM
I love yWriter, and not just because it is free! It is an excellent organizational tool and for those doing NaNoWriMo, it has an option to export as obsfucated text for the upload. But its usefulness goes well beyond that.

I have recently gotten a copy of Scrivener which I plan to try out as well, after hearing rave reviews. I liked the idea that I could use it to corral my research as well as to plan and organize my story.

Esper
05-30-2012, 06:40 AM
Final Draft is more or less an industry standard for film/tv and comes equipped with a handy layout for novel writing, too. In regards to outlines - mind node is a pretty cool app on mac for making web diagrams of your plot points / mapping character arcs.

Working Spy
05-31-2012, 04:38 PM
I actually use 'Myself v.1.02' (1.0 and 1.01 both crashed after too much beer), with the add-on package 'Suggestions from the missus v.1.0' (the definitive program).

Lucky you who has someone who cares enough TO suggest. But I definately use 'Myself v.1.02'. It even reboots itself!

Laer Carroll
10-11-2012, 11:03 PM
Keep in mind that every writer is unique and has unique needs. What works for one may not for another, and vice versa.

I've tried all the software help tools and in the end returned to using Word and a fact organizer I created. (I'm a software engineer of long experience. It was actually easier for me to whip up a customized version in the Java computer language rather than use one someone else had created.)