PDA

View Full Version : How much of the ending do you put into the synopsis?



CourtneyAllisonMoulton
09-14-2005, 07:58 AM
Hi :)

I know that you shouldn't leave the reader hanging and that you should describe the ending in brief detail in the synopsis, but how much detail exactly? For example, do you say who dies and who doesn't in the big climactic battle, or do you just say the book ends with a big climactic battle? Of course, not quite that elementary, but you get my meaning :)

I have a good chance of getting an opportunity to speak with a top agent from a top firm, so I want everything to be the best it can.

Thanks so much!
Courtney

Andrew Zack
09-14-2005, 06:36 PM
I want the synopsis to have the ENTIRE story.

maestrowork
09-14-2005, 07:10 PM
Never deprive the agent of the actual ending. If your protagonist dies, say so.

three seven
09-14-2005, 07:12 PM
I actually find that deeply perplexing. We spend all this effort working the twists and surprises into our book, and then, by laying them all out up front, diminish the effect of the entire story on the one person we really want it to impress. Genius!

Cathy C
09-14-2005, 08:41 PM
Not at all, three seven. The goal is to have the agent and/or editor be the equivalent of your co-author. That person MUST know that you've wrapped up the major plot points in the book satisfactorily, so it's a smooth storyline. Then the only question remaining is whether you've written that plot in an intriguing manner that will interest the readers.

maestrowork
09-14-2005, 09:44 PM
A lot of the times the destination is not nearly as interesting and captivating as the journey. True, for some genres (mystery, for example) revealing the ending might zap the enjoyment out of the read.

But agents do not read mss. for pleasure. To them, it's a business document, a product. They want to see if the product is solid enough to represent (and make $$$ on).

three seven
09-14-2005, 09:52 PM
The goal is to have the agent and/or editor be the equivalent of your co-author.Is that my goal or his goal?

fedorable1
09-14-2005, 10:16 PM
Both. It's a mutual, working relationship.

three seven
09-14-2005, 10:18 PM
That was a rhetorical question. I can quite categorically say that I'm not interested in having anything even resembling a co-author.

triceretops
09-14-2005, 10:31 PM
It is also a way to weed out authors who don't have their novel written/completed. How are you to know the precise details of the story's end if you haven't lived it?

Tri

maestrowork
09-14-2005, 10:37 PM
That was a rhetorical question. I can quite categorically say that I'm not interested in having anything even resembling a co-author.

I see an agent as more of a business partner than a co-author. There's going to be only ONE author for my books, and that would be me.

three seven
09-15-2005, 01:31 AM
There's going to be only ONE author for my books, and that would be me.

http://www.geocities.com/thingumybobwotsit/stupid.gif


Wait, we didn't just agree on something, did we? http://www.geocities.com/thingumybobwotsit/shocked.gif

CourtneyAllisonMoulton
09-15-2005, 11:25 PM
Thanks a lot for your replies everyone :) This clears up some confusion I had.