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quicklime
08-17-2010, 07:51 PM
By the time someone is roofing a house, my wife suggested all framing was likely to be done.

What else might they be working on at the same time as roofing?

Thanks,
Mark


P.S. are uncut 2x4s referred to as studs, or only when cut?

Thanks,
Quick

Don Allen
08-17-2010, 09:31 PM
Studs are already up and framed. A stud is referred to as the inside vertical pieces of a frame, most common are 2x4 but metal studs are available as well. If your wife is as beautiful as she is smart, you are a lucky man. Most framing will be done, though there are always exceptions, most notably that an owner or designer is un-happy with the space and wants a redo...

On occasion a new construction will build a shell with a design to be added later depending on the model a buyer wants.. The problem with this is cost. It's more efficient and cheaper to frame structure at the beginning of a project. Especially tru when designing load bearing walls.


Hope it helps...

PeterL
08-17-2010, 09:37 PM
Around the time when roofing is going on the rough wiring is going in. The rough plumbing probably is already in; if it isn't, then someone screwed up.

A 2x4 becomes a stud when it is installed as a stud.

quicklime
08-17-2010, 09:37 PM
Studs are already up and framed. A stud is referred to as the inside vertical pieces of a frame, most common are 2x4 but metal studs are available as well. If your wife is as beautiful as she is smart, you are a lucky man. Most framing will be done, though there are always exceptions, most notably that an owner or designer is un-happy with the space and wants a redo...

On occasion a new construction will build a shell with a design to be added later depending on the model a buyer wants.. The problem with this is cost. It's more efficient and cheaper to frame structure at the beginning of a project. Especially tru when designing load bearing walls.


Hope it helps...


she's pretty cute.....she's also an insurance adjuster, so she has a leg up on construction.

Thanks for the input; what else would they be working on at the same time as the roof then? Drywalling and finish carpentry?

thewakingself
08-18-2010, 12:49 AM
Thanks for the input; what else would they be working on at the same time as the roof then? Drywalling and finish carpentry?

Actually, no. You want the roof finished before you start doing that. Drywall can mildew if it gets wet (and stays wet), and you'll want a lock on the door when you're installing millwork and doing things like sanding / painting trim or installing finished floors.

Windows can be installed in the framework while they're laying shingles. Insulation and vapor barriers in the walls, floors, and roof get installed before drywall, and so will the HVAC / mechanical units and ducts. If the house is brick, they may start laying it after the vapor barrier gets installed since mortar takes a while to cure.

You'd be surprised how quick houses can go up since several trades tend to work at the same time in various stages of completion. Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions--my u-grad degree was in architecture, and I worked an architect before getting on the finance side of things.

jennontheisland
08-18-2010, 01:00 AM
Before you do any of the interior finishing work, you're going to get to a stage called "Lock Up". This means there are exterior walls, interior framing, a finished roof, and windows and doors have been installed. The place is lockable.

Interior framing will likely be 2x4. I've seen some construction that uses 2x6s on interior but usually only higher end homes. They are a little more commonly used as studs on exterior walls. You get more room for insulation that way which is handy in more extreme climates.

The house we built had a load bearing 30' front wall of windows. It required nine 2x6 studs secured together to created the main post, and seven 2x6s for the stud-posts on either side.

While the roof is going up, you may get trades in there to rough in the plumbing and electrical, or to install the exterior doors and windows.

GeorgeK
08-25-2010, 10:24 PM
All load bearing walls will need to be in place prior to setting rafters. For most common mid priced homes in America, all the exterior walls will be load bearing and depending upon the plans, there may be some interior load walls too, typically around chimneys and stairs, but a lot of the interior walls are things that could be relatively simple for a planner to say, "Move this wall one foot to the left!" The carpenters won't like it unless they are getting paid for revisions too.

On our house the Tyvek (trademarked brand of vapor barrier) was being placed by the carpenters while the roofers were finishing the roof underlayment, and the mason was starting to lay exterior facing bricks.