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triceretops
09-11-2005, 01:01 PM
I thought that I would compile a list of non-responsive agents and publishers who haven't answered email/snailmail queries for over 85 days. I don't do followups on these types and put them in my backfile. For whatever the reason they have not peeped back. Many of them were solictied with a prior book with the same results--nada. You might see some familiar faces here, then again, you might have gotten answers from some of those listed.
(These are Novel queries)

Donald Maass Lit Agency
Trident Media Group LLC.
Peter Rubie Lit Agency STD
Jane Chelius Lit Agency
Don Congdon Assoc. Inc
AIO Publishing
Willian Morris Agency
Timberwolf Press
Big Score Productions
Ethan Ellenberg Agency
Farber Lit Agency
John Hawkins Lit
Susan Ann Protter Lit
Writers House
Permuted Press
Baen Books
Black Death Books
Helm Publishing
About Words Agency
Ralph M. vianaza, LTD
Scovil Chichak Galen
Sternig & Byrne Lit
Coscom Entertainment
Phobos Books
Tyrannosaurus Press (I think Katrina got this one)
Richard Curtis Assoc. (this is heartbreaking since he's my old agent)

This is kind of a disturbing trend that we have been discussing on the boards recently. I'm not saying these are bad or discourteous agents. I simply cannot touch bases with them for whatever reason. Perhaps their websites are too old and they have gone the way of the dodo. I DO NOT have a current Writers Market--therein might be some of the problem.

Here's the real kicker--One third of these agents responed to my non-fiction book query six months ago! Are we in the midst of an industry fiction glut?

Tri

Pencilone
09-11-2005, 01:58 PM
Thanks Triceretops!

Most of these are exactly the names I intend to submit too... (only when I'm ready that is ).



It's pretty discouraging to see that they do not respond, or they take an awful long time to do it. Life is so short! This is what makes me want to submit my query even if the whole manuscript is not ready yet. But then I stop thinking that Iíll sabotage myself if they ask for it right away.



I completely understand your grief and I just hope that perseverance and hard work will make us win eventually! And, of course, a bit of luck if I dare ask for itÖ


Best,
Pencilone

triceretops
09-11-2005, 02:30 PM
Pencilone--thanks for the words. I thought that in all fairness I should list the one's who DID respond promplty. Many of them gave personal comments. A "*" represents especially thoughful responses or advice. A few replys came back with delivery failure or "closed to submission" notices, but I still counted those as responding.

John Hawkins
Sturart Krichevsky Lit
Behhler Publications
Kristen Nelson Agency
W Clark Assoc.
Graybill and English *
Reece Halsey North
Richard Henshaw Group
Harvey Klinger Inc.
Donald Farber Agency
Psaltis Lit*
Mary Tahan Lit agency
Hellbound Books
Hard Shell Word Factory (closed)
Tachyon Books
Aardwolf Press
Vincent Press Publications
Alexis Stuart Productions
Spectrum Lit Agency (closed?)
Creative Book Services
Ashley Grayson Lit Agency
Lukeman Lit Agency (delivery failure)
Night Shade Press (delivery failure)


So it looks like about a 50/50 split, between those who are awake and those asleep at the wheel. This is only my personal experiences. Yours might be different.

Richard
09-11-2005, 02:33 PM
You forgot to tell them they'd only get the antidote after they responded, didn't you?

triceretops
09-11-2005, 02:36 PM
Richard, you are so correct!

Tri

GWBailey
09-11-2005, 05:40 PM
Gosh, and I thought it was just me being a bad query writer! Thanks for posting. Yes, many are familiar to me too.

I think it was Gerard Jones who joked that agents have created a cottage industry steaming stamps off envelopes. It does make me wonder where they go.

Of those on your list, I did get a response back from Tyrannosaurus Press and Jane Chelius. You can imagine what the results were.

I guess they are swamped...

Geo~

triceretops
09-11-2005, 07:42 PM
GW, thanks for the tips. As far as Tyrannosaurus Press, you must have contacted them prior to Katrina because they are based in Louisianna, and I sent them a query right in the middle of the storm. Me, being the non-observant dolt that I am.

Hmm...so you got something back from Jane, eh" Veddy interesssssting!

Tri

PattiTheWicked
09-11-2005, 07:54 PM
In regards to some of these:

Donald Maass Lit Agency: It says on their website that they only respond if interested, but I have queried them before and gotten a reply in two months.

Trident Media Group LLC: I sent them a snail mail query with synopsis and three chapters on 7/24/05, and received a "thanks but no thanks" email on 8/1/05.

Willian Morris Agency: I sent a letter and synopsis by snail mail on 7/22 and received a "thanks but no thanks" on 8/24/05.

Ethan Ellenberg Agency: I emailed them on 7/12 with a synopsis, and received a "thanks but no thanks" email within about two days.

Writers House: Sent letter on 7/24 with synopsis, no response yet.

Scovil Chichak Galen: Emailed Russ Galen in February, never heard anything back. Their website does say they only respond if interested, or at least it did in Feb.

Anyway, obviously, your mileage may vary.

latichever
09-11-2005, 08:10 PM
I've found it interesting that a couple of agents who responded positively to my query and asked for my proposal didn't respond after I told them I had an offer of representation and where they still interested. In that case, is it ego or what?

triceretops
09-11-2005, 08:25 PM
Thanks, Patti. You were correct about the not-interested-no-response thing. How I missed those few is a mystery. It shows me how very careful you have to be in reading these websites. And that's where all the time is spent reading the sites so that you catch the different guidelines. A really good generic query can work for a lot of agencies because they all request the same things. Only some throw a curve at you, and sometimes I wonder if it is to catch you up so you goof, thereby giving them credence to ditch/delete you.

Some of these email submissions for chaps and fulls are totally bizarre--no header this, only on the left that, name and title upper this that or the other, two-inch margin left--1 1/2 right, single space this, then double space that, no page count this, no chapter break that..........you get the idea. I swear to gawd it's like you have to run a gauntlet and let the sticks pummle you before you think you've got it right. Hell, I don't know PDF from DDF, but I can tell you this, these specialized agencies and pubs tell you that if you do not get every one of their specifics for submission right, you're in the waste can (Don't you just love those sites)? I'm a nervous wreck before I've hit the send button. Gak! I just remembered my page counts are at the bottom instead of the top! I'm doomed!

Tri

J. Y. Moore
09-11-2005, 08:32 PM
Well, although this is a depressing list, I did get a response from these:
Donald Maas (Jennifer Jackson) - form reject
Ethan Ellenberg - form reject postcard - apx 35 days
Writers House (Michael Mejias) - form reject but originally typed and signed - 5 days
Baen Books - sent them chapters only - received an e-mail after 6 months saying it was still in the queue.
About Words Agency - received their standard referral to Zebra Communications for editing services - not recommended by P& E

I did not start keeping track of length of time on responses until later so don't have that info on some of these. Rejects, none-the-less! Sniff!!

triceretops
09-11-2005, 08:41 PM
Thanks, Jean. Wow, this is great to compare notes and cross-reference. Now that's two Donald Maas affirmatives that I can see, so that tells me mine probably didn't get through. So that helps. You gave me a great tip on About Words--didn't know that one was a weed-hopper.

Okay, Ellenberg looks a little better to me now. They did answer my non-fic proposal, just not the novel one. I'll put a "try again" by them.

Tri

Jamesaritchie
09-11-2005, 08:58 PM
William Morris is one of the largest agencies in the world, and getting lost in the shuffle there is not only easy, but almost expected. It just isn't an agency that new writers stand much chance with. They handle the big name writers, the movie stars, the sports stars, broadway actors and playwrights, singers, etc.

They have very litle incentive to work with a writer who can't earn them millions of dollars.

triceretops
09-11-2005, 09:03 PM
Dog gone it, I knew that in the back of my head too. William Morris is not the weed-hopper but the chosen one.

Tri

J. Y. Moore
09-11-2005, 09:07 PM
Good luck. I'm in the process of a second re-write to just sharpen up some of my phrasing, etc. so have stopped submitting until I finish it. I still have 3 out there with no replies:
Authentic Creations (submitted 5/12/05) - from reports on AW, I'm not sure I care
Tor Books (submitted 5/9/05) - they tell you up front it can be at least 4-6 months
Avon Romance - sent them an e-mail (4/9/05) asking about submission to their Eos imprint - no reply at all.

I need to set up a spreadsheet for these but just haven't taken the time. Life's hectic - then it's hurry up and wait - ugh!

zarch
09-11-2005, 09:34 PM
I've found that I'm more likely to get a response from one of those big agencies (William Morris, Writers House, etc.) if I address the query to one of the more junior agents.

Rejections, of course, but responses nonetheless.

GWBailey
09-12-2005, 12:37 AM
That's correct, Tri. I did contact T-Rex before Katrina blasted through Louisiana. Middle of July.

GW



GW, thanks for the tips. As far as Tyrannosaurus Press, you must have contacted them prior to Katrina because they are based in Louisianna, and I sent them a query right in the middle of the storm. Me, being the non-observant dolt that I am.

Hmm...so you got something back from Jane, eh" Veddy interesssssting!

Tri

kristie911
09-12-2005, 12:49 AM
Of the original list, these are the ones I did get a timely response from...all rejections but responses!

Donald Maass Lit Agency - form letter
Ethan Ellenberg Agency - postcard
Writers House - Nicely worded "not exactly a form letter"

One that I'd like to add to the list is Dee Mura Literary...I was told I would win a prize if I ever got a response from them! LOL Listing in Writers Market shows a 2 week turn around time for queries...I've been waiting 3 months so far!

Eldo
09-12-2005, 10:29 PM
Here are some of my recent rejection turnarounds:

Maass (J. Jackson) - two weeks
Dystel (Goderich) - four weeks
Writers House (Zuckerman) - nine days
Wm Clark (e-query) - one day
Rotrosen (Ruley) - nine days
Greenburger (Mandel) - nine days

A few have been outstanding for more than a month now, like Ellenberg, Manus, and Trident. Obviously, I'm exhausting some of the bigger agencies first, so I expected a pretty low success rate.

Dhewco
09-13-2005, 03:07 AM
I emailed J. Jackson a query a few days ago. I'm, of course, hoping for a different reply than you got, Eldo. LOL

The others I haven't tried yet.

I also emailed Ellenburg and Nelson.

Tri, what was Kristin Nelson's response? was it form?

David

Torgo
09-13-2005, 03:51 AM
Hi Triceratops - just to check, and I'm sure you are, but are you submitting correctly - each individual company's guidelines followed to the letter? Sad to say, but busy readers will seize on any excuse not to have to send rejection letters. (It makes far less odds when they want to buy your book...) But I'm sure you are, anyhow, and it is a shame.

triceretops
09-13-2005, 10:24 AM
Yeah, Dhewco, form rejections twice from Kristin Nelson. I had heard somewhere that once you get online with her as far as a partical or whole, that she breaks out with discussion. I'll not find out about that.


Torgo, It looks like I've goofed a few times here. However, these have been 90% email queries. My next stage will be with hardmail, so I might see a dramatic increase.

Tri

Euan H.
09-13-2005, 10:43 AM
My next stage will be with hardmail, so I might see a dramatic increase.

Tri

Just to let you know: all but two of the non-replies to the queries I sent out were to e-queries. When I sent a hard copy query, almost everyone responded (albeit sometimes very slowly).

PattiTheWicked
09-13-2005, 04:53 PM
Just to let you know: all but two of the non-replies to the queries I sent out were to e-queries. When I sent a hard copy query, almost everyone responded (albeit sometimes very slowly).

I've had about the same result. Nearly all the people I query by snail mail respond eventually, while some of the ones I've emailed never reply at all.

Irysangel
09-14-2005, 04:30 AM
I've found the same -- if you send out e-queries, either expect an extremely fast response...or don't expect one at all.

That being said, in regards to your list, I queried Jenny Bent at Trident Media Group and it was 82 days before they wrote back and requested my partial. They *are* there, I just imagine they're extremely busy. :)


I submitted to several others on your list, btw, and received responses back within a few weeks, but those were to paper queries. Me, I just think that unless they're looking for your email, it's being equivocated to spam-level.

JMO.

kristie911
09-14-2005, 07:08 AM
I queried Jenny Bent at Trident Media Group and it was 82 days before they wrote back and requested my partial. They *are* there, I just imagine they're extremely busy.

I was just wondering if you snail mailed Jenny or e-mailed her your query. I sent her an e-mail query last week and am patiently waiting a response.

As a general rule, I will not e-mail queries but I was out of stamps and bored at work so I sent out three. I just don't think you can seem as professional through e-mail as you can with actual paper. JMO though.

triceretops
09-14-2005, 11:27 AM
I think paper queries are much more likely to get read because they are portable and can be taken home with the agent/editor. I would certainly take a backlog home and sit on the couch going through them myself. And you know how we all love mail. You can make cyberwords go "poof" in a second.

I panic about one thing (since I'm an email god), I just hope that all of the agents are not logging my email queries into their system as (received and rejected) without me knowing it. That would be the ultimate discourtesy/disaster. I haven't double email-queried to received that ultimate "Hey, bud, I blew you and your idea off two months ago."

"Oh, yeah, how thoughtful of you not to tell me that so I can cross you off my list."

For partials and whole (paper) manuscripts I'm going to enforce 4th Class Special Book rate at the post office. As writers we are entitled to that deduction, and 15 years ago I used that mode exclusively. Today, I've used 3rd class with return receipt, and this is just tearing into my wallet like you wouldn't believe. Anybody out there using 4th Class Special Book Rate today?
Do they hassle you about it? It is so much cheaper than the other routes.

Triceratops

kristie911
09-14-2005, 04:28 PM
Is that the same a media mail by chance? I tried Media mail for my manuscript and they wouldn't let me...they said it was only for bound books not loose sheets. I had to pay 8 bucks to mail it.

zarch
09-14-2005, 04:36 PM
Me too. Eight bucks per manuscript. Maybe a couple bucks for each partial.


And more about non-responders: I have sent both snail mail queries and email queries. All six requests for more material (partial or full ms) have been after email queries. True, maybe half of the emails you send will not generate a response, but it's getting to the point where I send more emails than snail mail queries.

triceretops
09-14-2005, 04:48 PM
Kristie--it used to be called 4th class special book rate, and did allow loose page manuscripts. I got that straight with an employee at Mail Box's Etc, fifteen years ago, and she allowed me to use it everytime. Now, I admit I've been out of the loop and hear that you are calling it "Media Mail." I wasn't aware of this. And if it's not allowed anymore, I'm aghast.

Did you say $8.00 per whole manuscript, guys? Could I ask how you send it to get this rate. What is the cheapest was to go for paper submissions?

Tri

blacbird
09-14-2005, 06:28 PM
Is that the same a media mail by chance? I tried Media mail for my manuscript and they wouldn't let me...they said it was only for bound books not loose sheets. I had to pay 8 bucks to mail it.

First, I'm not convinced this is true. You might just have run into one of those postal employees from Hell (I've been told some of the most amazing things by postal employees, such as mailing from Alaska to the Lower 48 states takes international rates, etc.).

Second, how they gonna know it's a manuscript and not a bound book if you don't tell 'em? It's in a box, right?

bird

triceretops
09-14-2005, 06:37 PM
Blackbird--that's exactly how I got over on it, telling them I was an author and it was a book. They believed it.

Tri

zarch
09-14-2005, 06:44 PM
Priority mail (2-3 days) for my manuscript (60,000 words) is $7.60 (US)...then another $0.45 for delivery confirmation (which I highly recommend).

kristie911
09-14-2005, 07:52 PM
First, I'm not convinced this is true.

Second, how they gonna know it's a manuscript and not a bound book if you don't tell 'em? It's in a box, right?

bird

According to the USPS website, Media Mail is for books, manuscripts etc...If I'm ever asked to send a manuscript again, I will print it to show my postman.

And second, he saw what was in my envelope because I had to add a SASE and a reply card at the post office because I didn't have any at home. But next time I will be smarter and do that first!

It's always a learning experience!

J. Y. Moore
09-14-2005, 08:45 PM
I think paper queries are much more likely to get read because they are portable and can be taken home with the agent/editor. I would certainly take a backlog home and sit on the couch going through them myself. And you know how we all love mail. You can make cyberwords go "poof" in a second.

I panic about one thing (since I'm an email god), I just hope that all of the agents are not logging my email queries into their system as (received and rejected) without me knowing it. That would be the ultimate discourtesy/disaster. I haven't double email-queried to received that ultimate "Hey, bud, I blew you and your idea off two months ago."

"Oh, yeah, how thoughtful of you not to tell me that so I can cross you off my list."

For partials and whole (paper) manuscripts I'm going to enforce 4th Class Special Book rate at the post office. As writers we are entitled to that deduction, and 15 years ago I used that mode exclusively. Today, I've used 3rd class with return receipt, and this is just tearing into my wallet like you wouldn't believe. Anybody out there using 4th Class Special Book Rate today?
Do they hassle you about it? It is so much cheaper than the other routes.

Triceratops
How could they hold it against you if you state in your hard-mail query that you emailed them and received no reply so are sending the hard-mail as a followup, postcard and SASE enclosed? Of course, this is only if their guidelines don't say something like "we only respond if ..." Those kinds of guidelines leave the door wide open for non-responses. (Sigh)

triceretops
09-14-2005, 09:08 PM
That's true, Jean. I can only hope that when I hit the bottom of the submission barrel that I will have the foresight and energy to retrace those negative emails and follow them up with a courteous hardmail query, just to put the controversy to rest. I am fast running out of science fiction agents. I would pick a not too popular genre to write in. (laughs). I'm only talking about mathematic odds here.

Tri

PattiTheWicked
09-14-2005, 09:11 PM
Just to add on a bit to an earlier post -- I queried Amy Berkower at Writer's House by postal mail on July 24th, and recieved a response today.

Not the response I wanted, but a response nonetheless!

Jamesaritchie
09-14-2005, 09:14 PM
For partials and whole (paper) manuscripts I'm going to enforce 4th Class Special Book rate at the post office. As writers we are entitled to that deduction, and 15 years ago I used that mode exclusively. Today, I've used 3rd class with return receipt, and this is just tearing into my wallet like you wouldn't believe. Anybody out there using 4th Class Special Book Rate today?
Do they hassle you about it? It is so much cheaper than the other routes.

Triceratops

The last thing you want to do is mail a manuscript fourth class. Fourth class mail is treated like crap, it gets routed all over the place, and it tells everyone you don't.

To heck with your wallet. When you start submitting things, writing becomes a business. First class is the best way to go with a manuscript that hasn't been accepted. Return receipt can also a bad idea because some agents and publishers won't accept delivery of anything that demands a return receipt.

Just mail the thing first class, and make darned sure "First Class" is stamped boldly on the package.

Fourth class not only makes a bad impression, there's a better than average chance it won't arrive in good condition, especially if you package it properly, which means both attractive and very easy to open.

Presentation matters, whether it's a novel manuscript, a short story, or a query. Unrequested novels in good, profesional packages and first class, short stories first class and in envelopes appropriately marked, and queries on good quality paper with matching envelopes, and not the Wal-Mart special stock.

Requested material is best sent priority, whatever the cost, but again, never send anything in a manner that makes someone sign for it at the other end unless you KNOW they don't mind. A goodly number of agents and publishers have mail drops where there is no one avaiolable to sign, and even if there is, when several hundred manuscripts may arrive each day, signing can be a huge irritant. Better to simply include a postcard they can return at a later date.

Fourth class is still available, and so is third class. This does not mean they should be used. Both are very bad ideas.

But look at the bright side. You could be in a bsuiness where you have to invest tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars to get started. The paltry few bucks that first class costs is nothing, I don't care how poor you are. Better to spend a couple of extra bucks to get it right than to throw away a few dollars less.

triceretops
09-14-2005, 09:14 PM
Thanks, Patti. I just marked that on my to do list for snail only.
Tri

Euan H.
09-15-2005, 07:24 AM
Return receipt can also a bad idea because some agents and publishers won't accept delivery of anything that demands a return receipt.

...

but again, never send anything in a manner that makes someone sign for it at the other end unless you KNOW they don't mind.


Andy Zack, for one, states specifically on his website never to send him anything that requries a signature.


The paltry few bucks ... is nothing,
Heh. Try mailing manuscripts internationally, and then I'll listen to complaints about how much postage costs. :)

Irysangel
09-15-2005, 03:08 PM
I was just wondering if you snail mailed Jenny or e-mailed her your query. I sent her an e-mail query last week and am patiently waiting a response.

As a general rule, I will not e-mail queries but I was out of stamps and bored at work so I sent out three. I just don't think you can seem as professional through e-mail as you can with actual paper. JMO though.


Whoops, sorry I didn't specify. I sent her a submissions package per their website -- query, synopsis and bio. Her assistant's been the one that I've had correspondence with over the partial and such, so I imagine she's getting all the queries routed to her.

Good luck!

Irysangel
09-15-2005, 03:12 PM
Priority mail (2-3 days) for my manuscript (60,000 words) is $7.60 (US)...then another $0.45 for delivery confirmation (which I highly recommend).

This is how I send mine too. They've started up these neat little boxes for Priority Mail, that if it FITS in the box, you only have to pay the price of the box itself. I've mailed out two fulls as priority and it cost me about $8 for each (and I paid for confirmation too).

You should check with the post office. If you're sending it Fed-Ex, you're probably screwing yourself out of some money.

David McAfee
09-16-2005, 12:27 AM
I thought that I would compile a list of non-responsive agents and publishers who haven't answered email/snailmail queries for over 85 days. I don't do followups on these types and put them in my backfile. For whatever the reason they have not peeped back. Many of them were solictied with a prior book with the same results--nada. You might see some familiar faces here, then again, you might have gotten answers from some of those listed.
(These are Novel queries)

Donald Maass Lit Agency
Trident Media Group LLC.
Peter Rubie Lit Agency STD
Jane Chelius Lit Agency
Don Congdon Assoc. Inc
AIO Publishing
Willian Morris Agency
Timberwolf Press
Big Score Productions
Ethan Ellenberg Agency
Farber Lit Agency
John Hawkins Lit
Susan Ann Protter Lit
Writers House
Permuted Press
Baen Books
Black Death Books
Helm Publishing
About Words Agency
Ralph M. vianaza, LTD
Scovil Chichak Galen
Sternig & Byrne Lit
Coscom Entertainment
Phobos Books
Tyrannosaurus Press (I think Katrina got this one)
Richard Curtis Assoc. (this is heartbreaking since he's my old agent)

This is kind of a disturbing trend that we have been discussing on the boards recently. I'm not saying these are bad or discourteous agents. I simply cannot touch bases with them for whatever reason. Perhaps their websites are too old and they have gone the way of the dodo. I DO NOT have a current Writers Market--therein might be some of the problem.

Here's the real kicker--One third of these agents responed to my non-fiction book query six months ago! Are we in the midst of an industry fiction glut?

Tri

I bolded the ones on your list that got back to me, real fast, with a nice, solid, "no thanks".

Donald Maas never got back to me, but I queried him via email and it says on the website they only reply to e-queries thay are interetsted in. Jack Scovil (from Scovil Chichak Galen) wrote me back the day after I queried him to tell me he didn't rep my type of work, and very couteously referred me to Russell Galen (same agency). Mr. Galen has not replied to my email yet, it has been about 4 1/2 weeks.

triceretops
09-21-2005, 12:35 AM
Well, the reason I didn't hear from Emily Sylvan of Writer's House is becaus she's moved to the Prospect Agency. Now either she's a new startup, or she is with someone else. I'll look that up.

For your info: Prospect Agency (Emily Sylvan) esk@prospectagency.com


Tri

Euan H.
09-21-2005, 04:52 AM
Well, the reason I didn't hear from Emily Sylvan of Writer's House is becaus she's moved to the Prospect Agency. Now either she's a new startup, or she is with someone else. I'll look that up.

For your info: Prospect Agency (Emily Sylvan) esk@prospectagency.com


Tri
Heh. So you got that email today as well, did you? I sent my query on June 13th, and got the reply back today. It really took them three months to find out that she'd left? Wow.

flotsamarama
09-23-2005, 10:46 PM
Like David, I also got swift responses from Writers House and Ethen Ellenburg. Anyone know anything about my list of non-responders, from queries sent in February?

Edite Kroll of Edite Kroll Literary Agency
Liza Pulitzer-Voges of Kirchoff/Wohlberg Literary Agency
Linda Loewenthal of David Black Literary Agency

flotsamarama
10-10-2005, 10:49 PM
Like David, I also got swift responses from Writers House and Ethen Ellenburg. Anyone know anything about my list of non-responders, from queries sent in February?

Edite Kroll of Edite Kroll Literary Agency
Liza Pulitzer-Voges of Kirchoff/Wohlberg Literary Agency
Linda Loewenthal of David Black Literary Agency

Hi... I'm trying to revive this question because no one has responded yet... Anyone know anything about these three agents? Should I just scratch them off my list?

Thanks in advance for any info.

Honey Nut Loop
10-11-2005, 02:37 AM
No idea about your non-responders. I'm a brit. But i send my MS first class. it cost about £13 because i sent an SASE along as well. So i don't want any of you complaining about $8. :box: :tonguen

Susan Pevensie
10-14-2005, 09:33 AM
If you send an SASE you deserve some sort of reply and I think, in the UK anyway, three months is about the longest you should wait. You could call to chase but, in my view - and what do I know? - it's pretty pointless! A couple of UK ones I've been waiting on:


Redhammer - since June
Anthony Harwood - since July

S

Sassenach
10-14-2005, 07:26 PM
If you send an SASE you deserve some sort of reply and I think, in the UK anyway, three months is about the longest you should wait.


Perhaps, but the fact remains that many editors and agents will not reply. Just the way it is.

arkady
10-18-2005, 06:23 PM
...I am fast running out of science fiction agents. I would pick a not too popular genre to write in. (laughs). I'm only talking about mathematic odds here.

This is a point often overlooked by those who glibly assure us that "there are, what, [insert your favorite randomly-chosen number here; I've read up to six hundred] agents out there! Just keep on submitting till you get a favorable response!"

True for some genres, perhaps, but not F/SF. If you start by eliminating agents known to be shady, then eliminate non-AAR agents and finally eliminate agents who explicitly don't handle fantasy or science fiction, the number shrinks exponentially to somewhere in the neighborhood of 60-70.

triceretops
10-19-2005, 12:17 AM
This is quite true, Arkady. I've deliberately put off the "hardcopy submissions only" until just recently, having saturated most of the email candidates. I've only now started a slow stream in that direction, when my finances are nill and stamps, ink, paper, and envelopes are no where to be seen. What's disturbing is the "so very sorry, my roster of clients is full" explanations I'm getting. I don't think we have a drought, but rather a glut in the agencies today. I was totally taken aback when I discovered that my old agent, Richard Curtis (One of the largest sci-fi/fantasy agents in the business) is not taking on ANY fiction until further notice!

Publishers as of late are dropping genre fiction lines in favor of more "platform written non-fiction narrative."

Guh! What's a fiction writer to do?

Tri

Jamesaritchie
10-19-2005, 01:52 AM
This is quite true, Arkady. I've deliberately put off the "hardcopy submissions only" until just recently, having saturated most of the email candidates. I've only now started a slow stream in that direction, when my finances are nill and stamps, ink, paper, and envelopes are no where to be seen. What's disturbing is the "so very sorry, my roster of clients is full" explanations I'm getting. I don't think we have a drought, but rather a glut in the agencies today. I was totally taken aback when I discovered that my old agent, Richard Curtis (One of the largest sci-fi/fantasy agents in the business) is not taking on ANY fiction until further notice!

Publishers as of late are dropping genre fiction lines in favor of more "platform written non-fiction narrative."

Guh! What's a fiction writer to do?

Tri

A fiction writer is to write. Contrary to the way it may seem, more novels are being published than ever before. Far too many novels are being published, and we'd all be far better off if publishers would chop the number of novels being published by at least 20%, and 25% would be much better.

As it stands now, so many are being published that bookstores are out of room. A new paperback novel can stay on the racks for only three weeks before it's push off by the next huge batch arriving from publishers. Hardcover novels are faring little better. Trouble is, no publisher wants to be the first to cut back.

Fortunately, bookstores and distributors are putting some pressure on publishers to make them cut back, and this can only be a good thing.

blacbird
10-19-2005, 05:34 AM
Fortunately, bookstores and distributors are putting some pressure on publishers to make them cut back, and this can only be a good thing.

No doubt, this is the best of all possible worlds.

bird

law900
03-28-2007, 12:44 AM
I E-queried Ethan Ellenberg (were there a lot of Es in my oppening?) on a Thursday evening, and Friday morning of the next day I had a reply and request for some sample chapters. The turn around time for the query with the Ellenberg Agency was very quick for me.

Currently I'm waiting to hear if I've made the cut and they would like to see the whole manuscript. But, it has been many weeks since they requested the sample chapters. Hereís hoping!

None-the-less, donít loose heart Ė I know it is hard to do, but you must just keep refining your query letters, your product, and yourself along this process. For myself, I just keep writing, 4 novels under the belt and many more in the old noggin. Many query rejections, many refinements, many more submissions. If you have a passion to write, keep writing and eventually you will get noticed.

Warm regards,
Law900

Jack_Roberts
03-28-2007, 10:16 PM
I thought that I would compile a list of non-responsive agents and publishers who haven't answered email/snailmail queries for over 85 days. I don't do followups on these types and put them in my backfile. For whatever the reason they have not peeped back. Many of them were solictied with a prior book with the same results--nada. You might see some familiar faces here, then again, you might have gotten answers from some of those listed.
(These are Novel queries)

Donald Maass Lit Agency
Trident Media Group LLC.
Peter Rubie Lit Agency STD
Jane Chelius Lit Agency
Don Congdon Assoc. Inc
AIO Publishing
Willian Morris Agency
Timberwolf Press
Big Score Productions
Ethan Ellenberg Agency
Farber Lit Agency
John Hawkins Lit
Susan Ann Protter Lit
Writers House
Permuted Press
Baen Books
Black Death Books
Helm Publishing
About Words Agency
Ralph M. vianaza, LTD
Scovil Chichak Galen
Sternig & Byrne Lit
Coscom Entertainment
Phobos Books
Tyrannosaurus Press (I think Katrina got this one)
Richard Curtis Assoc. (this is heartbreaking since he's my old agent)

This is kind of a disturbing trend that we have been discussing on the boards recently. I'm not saying these are bad or discourteous agents. I simply cannot touch bases with them for whatever reason. Perhaps their websites are too old and they have gone the way of the dodo. I DO NOT have a current Writers Market--therein might be some of the problem.

Here's the real kicker--One third of these agents responed to my non-fiction book query six months ago! Are we in the midst of an industry fiction glut?

Tri

Thank you for the list! Question though, your signature says one of your books is reped by an agent and that you've sold a few others. Why are you looking for an agent if you already have one? I thought once a writer does the impossible and finds an agent, they don't need to do it again?

Jack_Roberts
03-28-2007, 10:22 PM
A fiction writer is to write. Contrary to the way it may seem, more novels are being published than ever before. Far too many novels are being published, and we'd all be far better off if publishers would chop the number of novels being published by at least 20%, and 25% would be much better.

As it stands now, so many are being published that bookstores are out of room. A new paperback novel can stay on the racks for only three weeks before it's push off by the next huge batch arriving from publishers. Hardcover novels are faring little better. Trouble is, no publisher wants to be the first to cut back.

Fortunately, bookstores and distributors are putting some pressure on publishers to make them cut back, and this can only be a good thing.

Wait, how would that be a good thing? If they don't publish those books, why take on new books? If no new books, none of us can get into the market.

Sounds bad to me.

Pisarz
03-28-2007, 10:22 PM
Check out the date of Tri's original post.

Jack_Roberts
03-28-2007, 10:30 PM
Check out the date of Tri's original post.

Whoops! My face is red. So he found an agent, she/he found an editor and he sold two books.
SWEET!

And all under two years. Siigh. Maybe there is hope for us yet?

triceretops
03-29-2007, 01:33 AM
Yes, Jack, it did happen in two years and a lot of frustration. But by god, it did happen and it can happen to you too. Don't give up on Annabell. I've been following. Vamps are still pretty darn hot--especially in the smaller press, and there are a lot of them out there.

Gak. I look back at these archives in this thread and see just how frustrated I was. I had three novels out there at the same time, and I was taking major, major rejection hits. Out of about 125 rejections, no agent or editor ever read one of those novels in full. The very first agent that read one of my books all the way to the end, took me on. The very first publishers that read the other two books all the way through offered contracts.

The reason: My books have terrible, lethargic, tedius, slow, snail-like, sluggish, uninteresting, character/info dump beginings. NOBODY got through the partials, it seems.

After writing 15 unpublished novels in the past 17 years, you would have thought that I knew how to hook the damn reader in the first pages/chapter. Oh, no, not me. Because I thought I was so damn literary I could razzle-dazzle them with my voice/style. I've learned in the last six months that if you don't look at this with a commercial eye, and appeal to the reading public by getting off to a blistering start, chances are you won't be read. Now, I talking about genre fiction, here--SF and F to be precise.

I took a terrible pounding before I reached that "doh!" momment. Wish I could time travel back and fix those books. Sadly, I lost them in a fire. Well, I've written five more and I do know what I'm doing now.

Please, my writing buds, don't do what I did. Please start your stories off with a smash/bang--dive right into the story and keep that inertia up. Use character "sprinkling" throughout the book--don't info dump in the beginning. Gradually bring out the backstory, don't do it all at once up front just to get it out of your system. If you do a prologue, keep it short to three or four pages--but make it a damn good hook too.

Please learn from me!

One of those wisha, shoulda, coulda slices out of my life.

Tri

Jack_Roberts
03-29-2007, 08:18 AM
Very good advice! I haven’t reached 100 rejections, but it’s still way early. I started the first revision with a bang, but the third edits changed the first chap. It still starts with a bang though.
As some know, it’s my second, third and forth chaps that drag. You give such good advice. I mean, I KNOW she’s grab, hook and keep others. I proved it with that class of 5th graders. The age group want her and Roland. But I’m so busy showing agents the boring “family enter the New World” and “Oooh, there is a mystery in town” stuff. They HAVE those books. After the next batch of rejections, I think I might rewrite the boring stuff, feeding through out instead of all at once.

Thanks again for the advice, Tri.

Will Lavender
03-29-2007, 08:36 AM
Interesting thread to read.

Triceretops' story is a perfect example of why the "Keep trying!" mantra is a good one after all.

Jack_Roberts
03-29-2007, 03:46 PM
I like the AW poster who quotes Dory from "Finding Nemo",
"Just keep swimming"

triceretops
03-30-2007, 03:07 AM
Hah, just keep swimming!

Mel Fisher's "Today's the day."

"Never give up--never surrender." Galaxy quest.

"Write like you're dying, because you are." AW poster.

"Heed the unforgiving minute."

"Failure is not an option."