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aruna
08-02-2010, 12:01 PM
I don't know these languages but I'd love to! I feel bad that I've been going to Tamil Nadu reguarly in the last 35 years and still speak only a few words of the language.
Also, I'd love to speak Hindi. I actually have a teach-yourself audio set on my bookshelf and hope to find the time one day ---
As for Sanskrit -- I know the meaning of the most relative terms. I'd love to learn more. Hearing the Vedas sung is one of the most, beautiful, uplifting experiences of my life.

So, anyone who speaks an Indian language -- let's hear from you here.

Shadow_Bee
10-10-2010, 06:09 PM
I speak Bengali.

Deepspirit
10-13-2010, 10:23 AM
I speak Hindi and Bengali.

aruna
10-13-2010, 11:38 AM
I speak Hindi and Bengali.

Once, long ago, in India, a very famous Hindu saint asked me if I spoke Hindi or Bengali. I felt so honoured! Later, I was told that she could not believe that I wasn't Indian. And it wasn't just because of the sari I was wearing.
Sadly, in spire of starting this thread, I speak none of the languages in the thread title, or any other Indian languages. Just a few words of each. :(

Simran
12-26-2010, 05:30 AM
I'm learning Hindi!!!!!!

SaraP
12-26-2010, 05:34 AM
W00t!

Marian Perera
12-26-2010, 05:51 AM
I speak a little Singhalese... don't know if that belongs here.

Medievalist
12-26-2010, 05:55 AM
I can read Classical Sanskrit, the Sanskrit of the vedas.

It's pretty much required if you're a Celticist, or doing I.E. studies. I had to take two years.

The problem with learning Sanskrit is the way it's taught; it's taught purely for the purposes of grammar, no matter where you study.

When I take over the world, I'm going to use the amazing stories that are embedded in the Sanskrit law texts, and scriptures, and seduce people into learning Sanskrit.

Story will encourage people to learn; you get narrative lust, and it makes you want to learn the language so you can find out What Happens Next. This would totally work with Sanskrit, which has long story cycles embedded in the myths/religious texts.

lnmorton
12-26-2010, 10:46 AM
Medievalist, that's basically the way the Sanskrit courses I took worked (I studied it at the University of British Columbia, if you're curious) - of course we worked on grammar, but all of our readings were poetry and stories from Hindu scriptures. It's definitely a great motivator. It probably helped that we had a fantastic prof who was very excited about the language.

I was very sad when I couldn't fit any more Sanskrit around the courses I needed to graduate (the university only offered one section a year). It's a beautiful language, with a lot of beautiful writing to read.

aruna
12-26-2010, 10:50 AM
I'm learning Hindi!!!!!!
I must have picked up that vibe! Just yesterday I took my "lern Hindi in Three MOnths boxset off the shelf and began reading the booklet - I haven;t looked at it in years!



When I take over the world, I'm going to use the amazing stories that are embedded in the Sanskrit law texts, and scriptures, and seduce people into learning Sanskrit.

Story will encourage people to learn; you get narrative lust, and it makes you want to learn the language so you can find out What Happens Next. This would totally work with Sanskrit, which has long story cycles embedded in the myths/religious texts.

We need to collaborate, somehow.
Almost 40 years ago I read the Mahabharata (in English) and was bowled away by its magnificence. That began my search, in vain, for the "perfect" English Mahabharata; but they all left me disappointed. Either the story was buried in too much detail, or the writing was atrocious, or or or.
So about 35 years ago I began writing my own English version, and I;ve been at it since then! I can't read Sansrkit so it's not a translation, nor is it strictly speaking a condensation (though it is down to 100000 words). I simply picked out the thread of the real story, dramatised it, brought out the characterisation, in other words made a novel of it while keeping the story intact. One change I did make was to highlight the Karna-Arjuna conflict. Karna is my favourite character and it grieves me to see how he is neglected in almost all versions I read, made a villain when in fact, for me, he is the real hero and the lynchpin of the whole story. One day I hope to have it published.
But you are right; the What Happens Next forces you to read on. I wish more people knew this story.

PrincessofPersia
12-26-2010, 12:50 PM
I would like to learn Sanskrit. The closest I come is Sumerian and Egyptian.

Orion11Bravo
01-05-2011, 08:18 PM
If you want to learn one of these languages then the trick is to have a kid with an Indian. Before I only spoke English and Broken English...now I'm learning Bengali along with my 6 month old! (all I know is dhood and bi-kana (sp?), but that's all he knows, too).

Orion11Bravo
01-05-2011, 08:19 PM
I can't read Sansrkit so it's not a translation, nor is it strictly speaking a condensation (though it is down to 100000 words). I simply picked out the thread of the real story, dramatised it, brought out the characterisation, in other words made a novel of it while keeping the story intact. One change I did make was to highlight the Karna-Arjuna conflict. Karna is my favourite character and it grieves me to see how he is neglected in almost all versions I read, made a villain when in fact, for me, he is the real hero and the lynchpin of the whole story. One day I hope to have it published.


I think this is a great idea...good luck!

aruna
01-05-2011, 08:36 PM
I think this is a great idea...good luck!

A really strange thing happened. I self-published it through Lulu, then took it off after a few months. It had made only tao sales, one in the UK and one in the US.
Yesterday a good friend in the US mailed me and said he was reading it -- he didn't know it was by me, as I had given myself an Indian pen name! Best of all, he was actually enjoying it! So it looks like that one US sale went to him! Talk about coincidences... of all the millions of US citizens, a friend of mine bought the one book that sold.

SaraP
01-05-2011, 09:45 PM
It really feels like a small world sometimes, doesn't it? :)

pianocigarette
10-16-2011, 09:02 PM
?

poetinahat
10-16-2011, 11:14 PM
Something about Tamils?

aruna
10-17-2011, 10:49 AM
Yep, that looks like Tamil. Content blank, though!

L M Ashton
10-17-2011, 12:17 PM
It says, "Are there any Tamils?" or "Any Tamils here?" I had the husband translate it for me. It looks like this person is looking for more Tamil writers.

pianocigarette, I don't know whether you're a Tamil from India, Sri Lanka, or elsewhere, but there are south Asians here. Whether or not they read/write/speak Tamil I have no idea. Well, except for the husband, but he hasn't been to AW in a long long time.

Simran
07-28-2012, 04:26 AM
I must have picked up that vibe! Just yesterday I took my "lern Hindi in Three MOnths boxset off the shelf and began reading the booklet - I haven;t looked at it in years!


Awesome! I finally bought a used Rosetta Stone program to learn it properly! Lovin it! After Hindi, it will be Punjabi and then who knows! :-)

Technician
08-07-2012, 11:32 AM
I can read Classical Sanskrit, the Sanskrit of the vedas.

It's pretty much required if you're a Celticist, or doing I.E. studies. I had to take two years.

The problem with learning Sanskrit is the way it's taught; it's taught purely for the purposes of grammar, no matter where you study.

When I take over the world, I'm going to use the amazing stories that are embedded in the Sanskrit law texts, and scriptures, and seduce people into learning Sanskrit.

Story will encourage people to learn; you get narrative lust, and it makes you want to learn the language so you can find out What Happens Next. This would totally work with Sanskrit, which has long story cycles embedded in the myths/religious texts.

I have had a ghost of an idea about this.
What is the connection between the Celts and Sanskrit?

Medievalist
08-07-2012, 11:37 AM
I have had a ghost of an idea about this.
What is the connection between the Celts and Sanskrit?


Both are I.E./Indo-European languages; they share a common "ancestor" language.

Lookiee here: http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/language.html

Technician
08-07-2012, 12:47 PM
I have bookmarked that page.
Is there a connection between the root language at the top and Aramaic? Or might it be that Aramaic is also descended in some way from it?

padnar
08-07-2012, 03:58 PM
I speak Tamil , but cannot write it, as my second language was Hindi in my school.
As you say sanskrit is essentially grammar . I would love to speak sanskrit . I wish somebody develop sanskrit for the layman .

exhale
08-08-2012, 01:35 AM
I read and write Hindi/Hindustani.
I can understand Nepali, Marathi and Bengali.
My favorite though is Mumbaiya slang.

SpiderGal
08-08-2012, 10:16 AM
Hindi is my mother tongue. Though I don't speak it a lot these days -- the Y generation mostly likes to converse in English -- I'm still quite good at it. And, of course, Hindi is still the language of choice when speaking with parents.

Need any help with learning Hindi? You know who your go-to person is.

Naren
08-25-2012, 07:59 AM
I can speak, read and write in Tamil, I can also speak Telugu and I speak a little bit of Hindi too..

adharma
09-17-2012, 02:55 PM
I can speak & write Hindi.

Other languages I either speak somewhat or grasp the essentials of if spoken to in include Gujrati, Marathi, Bengali.

I also studied Sanskrit for a year when I was very young (13). Don't remember much and the teaching in the school I studied it was horrendous.

I'm very happy to see so much love for Indian Languages here. The short story I'm writing (SYW link in sig) uses Hindi (in English script) quite a bit and I was wondering if I should switch it all over to English if I decide to publish it.

Now I'm almost convinced that I should keep the Hindi.

Nice to meet y'all.