PDA

View Full Version : File Sharers -- THIEVES! BAGGINSES!



dclary
07-22-2010, 03:13 AM
So, in a random google of my book's name, I find there's more google entries for it than I've sold copies. Like 10 times more. And why?

Because intellectual-property stealing assholes have bit torrented it up and down the cyberverse.

There's a reason why I don't rip cds or burn dvds or otherwise steal software and other intellectual property.

This is that reason.

I hate thieves with a passion. Especially when they steal *my* stuff.


/off raging in a corner.

thothguard51
07-22-2010, 03:23 AM
I think that means you have made the big time...

aadams73
07-22-2010, 03:29 AM
So...you wrote an unauthorized game manual (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=176536) and now people are stealing it?

:ROFL:

dclary
07-22-2010, 03:52 AM
So...you wrote an unauthorized game manual (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=176536) and now people are stealing it?

:ROFL:

Well, I did write to them and ask permission first. I mean, I'd feel better about this if each torrenter had bought their own copy to share, you know?

dclary
07-22-2010, 10:20 AM
The universe heard my lamentation! 5 sales today!

Mac H.
07-22-2010, 01:36 PM
So...you wrote an unauthorized game manual (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=176536) and now people are stealing it?

:ROFL:Huh?

It seems that you are equating writing an unauthorised manual with theft. How does that make sense ?

Even if he didn't get permission (which he did) it isn't theft - you can write a guide on how to use Microsoft Word on a Dell PC without getting permission from Dell or Microsoft.

BTW - DClary. If you had registered it with the copyright office before infringement you could start a John Doe lawsuit and get a minimum $600 (plus expenses) per torrent seed.

It's the new way of making money on Indie Film that would otherwise flunk.

Mac

Jamesaritchie
07-22-2010, 08:32 PM
My opinion of intellectual property thieves is much, much lower than yours.

dclary
07-23-2010, 12:14 AM
Huh?

It seems that you are equating writing an unauthorised manual with theft. How does that make sense ?

Even if he didn't get permission (which he did) it isn't theft - you can write a guide on how to use Microsoft Word on a Dell PC without getting permission from Dell or Microsoft.

BTW - DClary. If you had registered it with the copyright office before infringement you could start a John Doe lawsuit and get a minimum $600 (plus expenses) per torrent seed.

It's the new way of making money on Indie Film that would otherwise flunk.

Mac

Dang, Mac. I wish I'd known that! I'll definitely be doing that with any future projects!!!

One thing this book has done is given me seed money for new projects --- it pays for my web server, and any domain names I want to buy, and gives me lots left over for things I'd normally skimp on. But I'd sure like to take it a step higher and do things right.

djf881
07-23-2010, 03:15 AM
I heard the Internet is made of justice (http://gawker.com/5589103/how-the-internet-beat-up-an-11+year+old-girl).

Paul
07-23-2010, 03:25 AM
Huh?

It seems that you are equating writing an unauthorised manual with theft. How does that make sense ?

Even if he didn't get permission (which he did) it isn't theft - you can write a guide on how to use Microsoft Word on a Dell PC without getting permission from Dell or Microsoft.

BTW - DClary. If you had registered it with the copyright office before infringement you could start a John Doe lawsuit and get a minimum $600 (plus expenses) per torrent seed.

It's the new way of making money on Indie Film that would otherwise flunk.

Mac

So the work wouldnt already be deemed copyrighted?

thothguard51
07-23-2010, 03:34 AM
A computer game is copyrighted by its code just like any other computer program.

As far as I know, publishing a book on how to play or beat the game does not require permission anymore than me writing a book on old movies, or about sports teams, or even an unauthorized biography of someone famous, or infamous...

Paul
07-23-2010, 03:38 AM
A computer game is copyrighted by its code just like any other computer program.

As far as I know, publishing a book on how to play or beat the game does not require permission anymore than me writing a book on old movies, or about sports teams, or even an unauthorized biography of someone famous, or infamous...
for sure. so wouldn't Clary's e-book be automatically copyrighted? No?

Little Red Barn
07-23-2010, 03:47 AM
Sorry for your troubles.

BUT>

Don't know why you had to garbage up the title thread with a G.D. We have kids on board here, classy. SHEESH!

thothguard51
07-23-2010, 03:55 AM
Sure his book is copyrighted, as soon as he wrote it. Just not sure how the whole ebook notification thing works over printed copyright submissions.

I know a copy is requred. But in what format? Or is it send a copy in each format it is published in? Unsure...

dclary
07-23-2010, 07:45 AM
Sorry for your troubles.

BUT>

Don't know why you had to garbage up the title thread with a G.D. We have kids on board here, classy. SHEESH!


I do apologize for any shocked gasps, but even little kids should wish God's curses upon these scum.

thethinker42
07-23-2010, 08:23 AM
Deek, if it's any consolation, one of my books was on the pirating sites a week before it was even released.

Mac H.
07-23-2010, 10:17 AM
So the work wouldnt already be deemed copyrighted?Yes, it is.

However there is a quirk in US law which enables you to get 'Statutory Damages' if the copyright is registered before the infringement takes place. (Or within X months of publication - there are a few extra details)

If you don't register copyright ahead of time, a court case can force them to stop and hand over ACTUAL damages. That's fine, and is inline with much of the world. (You'll also need to register the copyright as part of the paperwork of starting the court case, but that doesn't help because it is after the infringement occurred)

The problem is that if they successfully argue that you lost only 2 sales of $15 each from hosting the torrent, then that's all you'll get - $30.

However the pre-registration also gives you 'Statutory Damages' - where everyone who downloaded from that Torrent seed is deemed to have cost you about $600 - irrespective of whether you actually lost a single sale.

So if a hundred downloads occurred you get $60k. And court costs. And legal expenses.

That makes the proposition a lot more enticing for a lawyer to take it on. There are companies set up whose sole job is to do this. They take a big chunk of the money but handle everything - issuing 'John Doe' law suits, then filling out forms with the ISPs to map actual internet points with the 'John Does', sending out settlement offers, doing the legal legwork, etc.

It's a fascinating area.

Mac

defyalllogic
07-23-2010, 05:50 PM
kind of makes me wish i made something worth torrenting...

MsJudy
07-23-2010, 08:22 PM
I have nothing pertinent to add, 'cause I don't know what y'all are talking about.

But filing a John Doe lawsuit against a torrent seed sounds like the premise of a great horror novel....

dclary
07-23-2010, 08:24 PM
In a strange twist of synchronicity, Wired had a story about the lawyers who file this kind of lawsuit yesterday.

I am considering seeing if I can find one.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/07/copyright-trolling-for-dollars/

Bartholomew
07-24-2010, 04:04 PM
Yes, it is.

However there is a quirk in US law which enables you to get 'Statutory Damages' if the copyright is registered before the infringement takes place. (Or within X months of publication - there are a few extra details)

If you don't register copyright ahead of time, a court case can force them to stop and hand over ACTUAL damages. That's fine, and is inline with much of the world. (You'll also need to register the copyright as part of the paperwork of starting the court case, but that doesn't help because it is after the infringement occurred)

The problem is that if they successfully argue that you lost only 2 sales of $15 each from hosting the torrent, then that's all you'll get - $30.

However the pre-registration also gives you 'Statutory Damages' - where everyone who downloaded from that Torrent seed is seemed to have cost you about $600 - irrespective of whether you actually lost a single sale.

So if a hundred downloads occurred you get $60k. And court costs. And legal expenses.

That makes the proposition a lot more enticing for a lawyer to take it on. There are companies set up whose sole job is to do this. They take a big chunk of the money but handle everything - issuing 'John Doe' law suits, then filling out forms with the ISPs to map actual internet points with the 'John Does', sending out settlement offers, doing the legal legwork, etc.

It's a fascinating area.

Mac

I'm registering copyright on everything from now on.

Jamesaritchie
07-24-2010, 06:49 PM
I'm registering copyright on everything from now on.

Only if you self-puboish. Otehrwise, it's a complete waste of money.

PsychicToaster
07-28-2010, 10:34 PM
kind of makes me wish i made something worth torrenting...

If some future publisher decides to pull the "hardcover eBook" nonsense, or refuses to list the eBook with Amazon due to contract disputes, or somesuch nonsense that gets between reader and book, then I doubt I will fault pirates.

Honestly, so long as I have done everything I can to make sure my work is available at a convenient marketplace and at a reasonable price, and still earn enough to live, I don't think I will ever pull my hair out about piracy.

I recognize the moral argument ("Stealing is wrong!"), but I don't think outrage leads to practical solutions. Better to be pro-active and offer something extra for legitimate copies, or just a polite appeal in the flypages of the pdf to go to your website and purchase it. If they're pirating it because they can't afford it, it was never a lost sale in the first place since they weren't a potential customer.

Simple economics: A potential customer is someone with both the means and the desire to purchase. Without one or the other, they weren't a potential customer.

Jamesaritchie
07-29-2010, 02:33 AM
If some future publisher decides to pull the "hardcover eBook" nonsense, or refuses to list the eBook with Amazon due to contract disputes, or somesuch nonsense that gets between reader and book, then I doubt I will fault pirates.

Honestly, so long as I have done everything I can to make sure my work is available at a convenient marketplace and at a reasonable price, and still earn enough to live, I don't think I will ever pull my hair out about piracy.

I recognize the moral argument ("Stealing is wrong!"), but I don't think outrage leads to practical solutions. Better to be pro-active and offer something extra for legitimate copies, or just a polite appeal in the flypages of the pdf to go to your website and purchase it. If they're pirating it because they can't afford it, it was never a lost sale in the first place since they weren't a potential customer.

Simple economics: A potential customer is someone with both the means and the desire to purchase. Without one or the other, they weren't a potential customer.

If thieves have the ability to steal a book, they have the money to pay for it. Last time I checked, you can't steal anything electronically without own the technology to download and read it.

And those who do the initial pirating, and spread what they steal all over the Internet, sure a shell have the ability to pay for it.

Besides, stealing a single copy is not the same thing as putting it on a website where anyone on earth can then download it.

These people are low-life scum, and the practical solution is to open a hunting season on them.

Public outrage is the only thing that ever leads to practical solutions. No outrage, nothing gets done about any problem.