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elindsen
07-19-2010, 12:43 AM
Okay, I'll never give up writing, its in my blood. But I seem to have absolutely no luck with finding representation. My first novel I queried I got about 1/3 responses and all rejected with the standard "not for us" rejection, nothing personal. Looking back I know what the problem was:Query and novel itself. My query sucked harder than my vaccum and my novel was completely filled with tense problems, grammar and forgotten words. Honestly when someone mentioned to me about trying to publish I jumped the gun without re-reading or doing anything with the first draft. I sent it as is, which was rough to say the least. So I'm fixing that problem now that I see the error of my ways.

My second book, a childrens picture book, I'm querying to only a few agents just to test the waters and see where I need to improve before I exhaust all of my resources. Its the beginning of the query process and I've only recieved one back saying the usual 'not for me' thing.

I'm not sure if I'm going through the typical rejection depression but I'm really feeling like I'm never meant to be published, except by Publish America. Like I said I'm always going to write but along with that is the magical dream of seeing it in print. I'm worried becuase my novel naturally breaks grammar rules and I'm ok with that. It's becuase I'm writing through 1st person and I'm writing it as I would think, to make it more real and relatable. This does include me breaking some grammar rules in the process. So by breaking these rules am I signing my own death warrant in the publishing world? Is it still exceptable to write kind of slangish?

BlueWolf
07-19-2010, 12:55 AM
Firstly, never give up.

Now that that piece of advice is done with, let's move on to the next. I sent out dozens, along with synopsis's and letters and got nowhere. Do you want to know the worst one I got? It was in fact the best.

A personal lengthy reply from a guy in the UK, who essentially told me, that although he liked what I had sent to him, I would get nowhere due to the genre (comedy with a sci fi backdrop), and that all they were looking for these days was the next (insert author's name here).

It destroyed me, did that. Forget the countless other simple no's, that was the one that killed me. But, my family said forget it, we move on, and we get it published; which, of course, it now is.

It wasn't like it hadn't been proof-read and did not look professional, it was purely down to the subject matter.

Now I have a network, and slowly but surely it is gaining speed. You can never give in, and you can never give up. Ever.

kaitiepaige17
07-19-2010, 01:03 AM
Like Wolf said: Don't give up!

I just about gave up on writing all together, but my fiance sat me down and MADE me start another story.

Now, it's probably the best thing I've ever written (I'm just on the 3rd chapter, but, hey who cares?)

The point is you never know when you're going to start something great. All you can do is practice, practice, practice and learn, learn, learn. After you've done that, write something FOR REAL and apply everything you've learned. After THAT, get some totally awesome BETA readers. It'll happen for you one day as long as you keep on going. :)

elindsen
07-19-2010, 01:09 AM
I had a beta and she did ok with my first chapter, but when I sent her the rest I've never heard back from her and its been four months. I've even emailed her dozens of times, but nothing.

I just really wonder if it will ever happen for me. Seriously there are so many people in life that no matter what things work out for. And then there's people like me who no matter what get told no, or get the worst things after putting blood, sweat and tears into. Working on changing that, but it doesn't seem to be working.

Calla Lily
07-19-2010, 01:12 AM
First, plz to read the first line of my sig.

Second, I nearly let PA grab my first book. Fortunately I found AW before that happened. This first book had a laundry list of errors. It holds a place in my heart, but it's trunked for now. And we won't go into my first pre-AW query letter. :e2paperba

Third, what I learned from that book and Q showed me how to write a better book. And a third.

While doing all this, I queried. Four years and 185 passes/no-responses later, I landed my agent. Then there are the editor passes. :e2drunk: Now, plz to read second line of my signature.

None of this would have been possible if I laid down and died at any point during those 185 Rs.

Take a break if you need to--but please please PLEASE stay away from PublishAmerica/Independence Press. They kill books and bank balances for a living.

As to your grammar question--I can't say it without seeing the book. Is your MC undeucated and thus doesn't know good grammar? Then it may work. What do your betas say? Have you had your query checked by people who know query mechanics?

I never recommend giving up--Lord knows I had several meltdowns during the past 4 years--but I never stopped. Good luck!

PoppysInARow
07-19-2010, 01:25 AM
I had a beta and she did ok with my first chapter, but when I sent her the rest I've never heard back from her and its been four months. I've even emailed her dozens of times, but nothing.

I just really wonder if it will ever happen for me. Seriously there are so many people in life that no matter what things work out for. And then there's people like me who no matter what get told no, or get the worst things after putting blood, sweat and tears into. Working on changing that, but it doesn't seem to be working.

Then your beta is irresponsable. Find a new one. Find eight new ones.

What are you going to gain by giving up? I can tell you right now: ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. You love to write? You want to get published? Well then, keep working. Publishing is a job, and if you really want to be published, then you have to accept that it's hard work. It is. A lot of people here work for five, ten, fifteen years before they see print.

And does that matter? No. Because they've worked for it. They've earned it. This is something to be earned, honey, and giving up is for losers.

You're not a loser. You're a writer. And writers will write, because that's what we do. Sometimes you're feeling low and nothing is going right. Have a drink, watch a sad movie, and get back to it.

NEVER give up. NEVER surrender. Because if this is something you really want, then you have to do whatever it takes to get it. Don't EVER think you don't deserve to be published, or that your writing sucks. Just keep going. Try new things. See what works and what doesn't.

This is ABSOLUTE WRITE. We write despite all the crap. We keep going. You just have to hold your head up high and reach for it.

Keep working. It may seem like you're not getting anywhere, but you are.

Now put your butt in that chair, and WRITE.

elindsen
07-19-2010, 01:43 AM
Thanks. To tell the truth Ive been writing for 10yrs and never thought of putting it out there. Its not until I got over my fear of loserville that I started sharing. I just feel like my work isnt good enough. Although my beta now says its one of the best shes read, she just became a beta so it doesnt count.


I can sit here and say it will never happen but in the end Ill query and try because I have nothing else to do but try.

Cathy C
07-19-2010, 01:56 AM
Although my beta now says its one of the best shes read, she just became a beta so it doesnt count.


:Huh: Are you serious about this? A beta isn't a profession. It's an opinion. To say a new beta is better or worse than a beta who's done it longer is like saying a person can't appreciate Italian cooking because it's the first time s/he's had it. Doesn't work that way.

Now, if the beta isn't well read AT ALL, that's one thing. But if the person has read a lot in the genre and just now started to read unpubbed manuscripts . . . well, that's another thing entirely.

As for the 1st person POV thing---I write a lot of 1st person and I do have my characters speak in sentence fragments. Often. Just like this. But that's dialogue, not narrative. What you have to watch out for is narrative that does the same thing. Unless the character is actually thinking each event, the descriptions of actions and locations shouldn't really follow a choppy formula. Mostly because it's hard for the reader to sort out what IS internalized thought.

Grammar is a big thing in publishing, whether self-publishing or the major houses. The big question is whether you want to change your skill level to try to raise your writing level. That's entirely up to you, of course. But really, it's worth it. Because right now, you don't know what you don't know. Once you find out what you don't know, you'll realize just how easy it is to fix the books so they DO get picked up by a major publisher.

Even a hobby is worth doing well, IMO. If I weren't publishing, I'd STILL try to increase my skill level. Mostly because it's fun to learn new stuff. :)

elindsen
07-19-2010, 02:45 AM
Cathy-as far as the beta sheknows writing and grammar things but doesnt like to read because most everything she read she says is too boring. Thats why I asked her to beta. If I can keep her through a whole book and she beg for the sequel, than to me that means it should keep avid readers and is interesting. I admit I may be wrong but if she knows where things should go and likes it then its an opinion Ill take.

As far as her thinking in fragment I do write like that but People who have read it dont think its choppy.

Miss Plum
07-19-2010, 03:31 AM
I just want to address one item: PublishAmerica. Do NOT go to these people. Not only do they take your money, they have been known to worsen your book. PublishAmerica authors on this very forum have reported these errors:

- repeated three chapters of the book in a row
- published just half the book (in other words, a 200-page book had only 100 pages)
- add spelling and grammar errors where they didn't exist before
- use inferior binding so that pages fall out of book
- slap on ugly covers

And that's only the publishing part. The author support and their business dealings are also abysmal. Read the PublishAmerica threads in the Bewares & Background Checks forum here. A few war-scarred veterans will be happy to share their experiences with you.

xiaotien
07-19-2010, 03:41 AM
it takes a really thick skin and balls
of steel to make it in publishing. so you
do have to Want It really badly to keep
going. otherwise, you give up and it never
happens. only you know if you have it in
you to keep improving and trying.

suki
07-19-2010, 03:52 AM
elindson, you're probably not going to be too happy with this post. But I'm going to post it so that we keep things real.

You haven't been around AW too long yet, but if you spend some time in the SYW section reading back through threads you will find familiar names, people who have spent years working on their writing, working on their book, educating themselves on publishing, on the mechanics of writing, on how to be better writers. Years.

I would guess from what I have seen of your writing posted on AW that you still have a great deal of work to do on your writing - and not just on the mechanics, but also on the voice/plot/character/dialogue, etc. - before you are really ready to be querying agents or trying to find a publisher.

So if you don't try to query too early, and put in the effort to get your writing where it needs to be, you'll give your manuscript a better chance. But if you query before your really ready, it's pretty much a waste of time.


Okay, I'll never give up writing, its in my blood. But I seem to have absolutely no luck with finding representation.

My first novel I queried I got about 1/3 responses and all rejected with the standard "not for us" rejection, nothing personal. Looking back I know what the problem was:Query and novel itself. My query sucked harder than my vaccum and my novel was completely filled with tense problems, grammar and forgotten words. Honestly when someone mentioned to me about trying to publish I jumped the gun without re-reading or doing anything with the first draft. I sent it as is, which was rough to say the least. So I'm fixing that problem now that I see the error of my ways. Great. And I'm not being sarcastic - great that you realized you jumped the gun. But in my opinion you're *still* jumping the gun. It could be, and I'd guess is, that your writing needs more work before it will be ready to query. So, keep working on it.

My second book, a childrens picture book, I'm querying to only a few agents just to test the waters and see where I need to improve before I exhaust all of my resources. Its the beginning of the query process and I've only recieved one back saying the usual 'not for me' thing. Well, I can tell you that PBs are about the hardest thing to sell right now outside of novellas. And it's even harder to find an agent for a PB.

Have you posted the PB text in SYW for critique? If not, get some critique on it, then all you can do is keep querying and then moving onto publishers. But are you sure it's really ready to be queried? PBs are insanely difficult to write well - it's certainly a skill set I don't have...so make sure it's really ready before you query.

I'm not sure if I'm going through the typical rejection depression but I'm really feeling like I'm never meant to be published, except by Publish America. I think what you are gong through is typical rejection, but compounded because you're probably still jumping the gun. Get more betas - and it may take more than a few months - it may take a year of getting critiques, putting bits up in SYW, revising and working....so that when you are ready to query, really ready, your manuscript has a shot.

Like I said I'm always going to write but along with that is the magical dream of seeing it in print. I'm worried becuase my novel naturally breaks grammar rules and I'm ok with that. A few rules broken, if you really know all the rules (ie, a sentence fragment here or there) is acceptable. But you can't just "naturally" break grammar rules and expect that to be ok. It's a very delicate balance, and you have to *know* the grammar rules exceptionally well to know when and how often you can break them. ;)

It's becuase I'm writing through 1st person and I'm writing it as I would think, to make it more real and relatable. But, again, you still need to mostly follow the rules.

This does include me breaking some grammar rules in the process. So by breaking these rules am I signing my own death warrant in the publishing world? Again, when you know the rules really well, you can also know when and how it is acceptable to break them. But it's a cop-out to say "Well, that's how I think so it's ok."

Pull a good novel off the shelf and you will see grammar rules broken in certain ways - in dialogue, for example. But the non-dialogue prose will often follow the rules, at least more often than not. Even in first person. And certain rules can be broke (like using sentence fragments) more effectively that others (wrong tenses, tense shifts, run-on sentences, verb agreement, etc).

Is it still exceptable to write kind of slangish? Again, in dialogue, sure, to an extent it's necessary. But your non-dialogue parts need to mostly follow the appropriate grammar rules. And some grammar rules really do need to be followed most of the time - like tense shifts and verb agreement.

elindsen
07-19-2010, 03:52 AM
As far as what I said about publishamerica I meant I feel like only they want my novel. I would rathercut my arms off and lay in a pool of my own blood before I would ever go near them.


I do want to be published. Well not exactly. My dream is for 10 strangers to read my story and close the book with a good feeling. Publishing is the only way to get that so I guess it has become my dream. Its just have you ever looked at yourself and said your not meant for this? Maybe Im only meant to work a dead end job. Like I said Im working on changing this but realistically...

suki
07-19-2010, 03:55 AM
I do want to be published. Well not exactly. My dream is for 10 strangers to read my story and close the book with a good feeling. Publishing is the only way to get that so I guess it has become my dream.

That's not true. If all you want is for 10 people to read it, start a blog and post it for free.

But if you really want to be published, then own that dream, but be prepared to put in the work - really put in the work, even if it takes years of working on your writing - to make it happen.

~suki

Calla Lily
07-19-2010, 04:01 AM
That's not true. If all you want is for 10 people to read it, start and blog and post it for free.

But if you really want to be published, then own that dream, but be prepared to put in the work - really put in the work, even if it takes years of working on your writing - to make it happen.

~suki

This. We all have moments where we think we can't write a coherent sentence to save our lives. They pass.

If getting published was easy, it wouldn't be worth the years of work.

Cathy C
07-19-2010, 04:01 AM
Cathy-as far as the beta sheknows writing and grammar things but doesnt like to read because most everything she read she says is too boring. Thats why I asked her to beta. If I can keep her through a whole book and she beg for the sequel, than to me that means it should keep avid readers and is interesting. I admit I may be wrong but if she knows where things should go and likes it then its an opinion Ill take.

As far as her thinking in fragment I do write like that but People who have read it dont think its choppy.

The reason I asked about your writing level is because we only see what you give us here on the boards. I'll say this because our goal here is to respect and help elevate the writing of members. This post says to me, "my grammar and punctuation need work." That's not to say you write your books like this. I know a lot of people who truly believe that the posts on a writing site like this "don't matter" because it's just intended to be random thoughts in posts.

But there's a fallacy there, because we only know you through your posts. This and others like it here will follow you forever because AW is big enough, and updated every second that the internet spiders track our every movement. Google is forever if you look long enough. So your posts here should be your very best work, just like your book should be.

If your story holds the interest of a non-reader, that's very good. But in the real world, if the grammar and composition need so much work that it would take an editor days or weeks to go through it, you'll struggle to find it a home because editors today don't merely edit. They have to prepare profit and loss statements, approve cover art, have meetings with marketing and promotion and senior staff. They're on the road taking pitches at conventions and doing a thousand other things. Editing is only one VERY minor part of their job. So the more time that takes from their daily routine, the less likely they are to accept that manuscript with very wonderful potential. They'd rather accept the merely wonderful book that is nearly shelf-ready.

Does that make sense?

It might not be an issue of should you give up publishing, but do you have enough want of being published that you're willing to do the hard work? It is hard work. We've all been there but the best part is that it gets easier each day. Every new thing learned is a thousand applications in the book. And there's so very much here at AW to learn---and all for free.

If you want publication, it's here for the asking. And the trying. :)

ILSinTexas
07-19-2010, 04:19 AM
Hi again, elindson:

I've answered some of your threads in the SYW forum. The material you have posted still needs a lot of work. You need to learn the craft of writing. And yes, it is a craft. I studied clarinet in high school, really studied it, because my dream then was to be first chair, first clarinet, in my high school's orchestra. Guess what? I was promoted in my senior year and got to play a solo in our of our concerts--Sentimental Journey. It still gives me chills to think about it. It was what I wanted to do more than anything, so guess where I was several days a week during the summer vacation? Taking music lessons at school. Like playing an instrument, writing needs to be learned. How do you learn to write? You practice. You study the writing of others. You line up several beta readers and edit your MS everytime one of them finishes it. You beta read for them and learn what pulls you out of their story. That way, you'll remember when writing your own story.

You say you've been writing for years, but if you don't try to improve your writing, you'll remain stagnant at the same writing level.

I started seriously writing in 2003. I have three trunked novels behind me, but guess what? I never gave up. And I write every night. Every night. The only exception was the time I was in the hospital. I even make time to write on Christmas eve. The novel I'm currently querying is my 4th novel. And guess what else? I was on the phone on Friday with an agent who wants to rep me. I worked long and hard to get to this point. None of it was easy. It's damn hard work, too. Nothing you want bad enough is easy.

You said:


Maybe Im only meant to work a dead end job.

If this is your attitude, you probably should give up now.

Sorry, I'm not trying to be snotty or anything. You threw this out on the board, asking for opinions.

Good luck with your story.

elindsen
07-19-2010, 04:38 AM
Texas
just because I feel like thats suppose to be my fate doessnt mean Im not busting it everyday to change. I am. I write at least 2 hours a day and in off time I pull out my grammar book and read it. From my first draft til now I thiink my ms has come leaps and bounds. I havent posted any of the re edited and worked paarts either which I said origiinally was very rouugh. My ms isnt much of the same. And with queries the idea kind of doess make me choke because iits so important.. My ms is so much more fun than the query.

I dont think Im going to find a beta. They work for some people but I just doont no if it works for me.

Calla Lily
07-19-2010, 05:14 AM
elindson: There's a "search for betas" board here on AW. I can't emphasize enough how much my betas have saved my novels from glaring errors and politely told me which scenes bored them stiff and/or were unnecessary to the plot. I wanted the agents I was querying to see the most polished version possible--much better that fellow writers saw the errors than someone I wanted to rep me did.

You've gotten a lot of useful advice in this thread. I recognize the doldrums, however if you come at writing ad querying and the idea of getting published with this attitude:


And then there's people like me who no matter what get told no, or get the worst things after putting blood, sweat and tears into.


I'm really feeling like I'm never meant to be published,


I can sit here and say it will never happen but in the end Ill query and try because I have nothing else to do but try.


Like I said Im working on changing this but realistically...

...it will carry through into your queries. Negativity begets negativity. Been there, done that, burned the t-shirt. Only you control your attitude toward this.

And a bit of advice. The follwoing sentence:


I dont think Im going to find a beta. They work for some people but I just doont no if it works for me.

Is indicative of your posts here. Careless typing bleeds into careless errors in grammar and spelling and plot/character details. We're writers, and unless there's a real reason (dyslexia, ESL) for not posting 99% of the time in correct English, it's in a writer's best interest to do so. Once in the habit, it continues, making that first, second, third drafe that much smoother.

Good luck.

Miss Plum
07-19-2010, 05:28 AM
As far as what I said about publishamerica I meant I feel like only they want my novel. I would rathercut my arms off and lay in a pool of my own blood before I would ever go near them.

Haha, okay. I thought you might be joking, but I just had to throw out that warning in case you weren't.

Amadan
07-19-2010, 05:32 AM
Texas
just because I feel like thats suppose to be my fate doessnt mean Im not busting it everyday to change. I am. I write at least 2 hours a day and in off time I pull out my grammar book and read it. From my first draft til now I thiink my ms has come leaps and bounds. I havent posted any of the re edited and worked paarts either which I said origiinally was very rouugh. My ms isnt much of the same. And with queries the idea kind of doess make me choke because iits so important.. My ms is so much more fun than the query.

I dont think Im going to find a beta. They work for some people but I just doont no if it works for me.

Okay, you've got two problems here.

One is that your writing needs work. That's just the way it is. Recognize that you are very far from being able to write at a professional level, and realize that you can do it, but it's going to take years and years and thousands and thousands of unpublished (and unpublishable) words to get there. So forget about querying. Your current manuscript is not publishable, and will not be publishable in anything like its present form. Work instead on improving your writing, either with this manuscript or another one.

The second problem is that you're throwing yourself a little pity party. Everyone's entitled to one now and then. But if you're going to be a writer, all the time you spend moaning about being rejected is time you're not spending writing, so get over it, pick yourself back up, and get back to writing.

Also, betas are indispensable. But your MS should be what you consider to be (almost) query-ready before you get a beta, and I don't think yours is. You can't just throw an ungrammatical mess at a beta and expect them to line-edit it and maintain their enthusiasm and diligence. A beta will work for you, if you work to make your writing the best it can be.

elindsen
07-19-2010, 06:08 AM
Just as a quick question and dont take this as offensive but how do you know what my ms needs? Up until 30 secoonds ago I dont think Ive ever met you.

(as a side note about my writing on here I dont allow myself to come on heere on the comp. Save that time for writing. Everything I write is text in)

Calla Lily
07-19-2010, 06:13 AM
Just as a quick question and dont take this as offensive but how do you know what my ms needs? Up until 30 secoonds ago I dont think Ive ever met you.

(as a side note about my writing on here I dont allow myself to come on heere on the comp. Save that time for writing. Everything I write is text in)

I believe the people here suggesting your ms. isn't ready for querying based that opinion on the writing you put up in SYW. I looked at one of them, and it does have many spelling, grammar, and structure errors. All of which, let me immediately say, are fixable with study and practice. I drew the conclusion that the ms. you're querying may have the same problems.

I'm sorry, but I don't know what you mean by "on the comp". Do you mean you don't log into AW from work and are texting from your phone? Then I completely understand the typos and lack of punctuation. I text a lot faster than I used to, but I too don't use apostrophes in texting, and I often duplicate or delete letters.

ILSinTexas
07-19-2010, 06:30 AM
Amen, Amadan!

I've been trying to tell you this, elindson. If you don't try to improve your writing, you're spinning your wheels. If you really believe your book will help others, then my suggestion would be to e-publish with Amazon. That way, you'll get the ten readers you're hoping for, and it just might change their lives.

I have to ask this. Since you came to AW, you've posted a lot of your work. Many AW folks have tried to help you. We've offered suggestions, and edits. You always respond by saying you'll change things, but you don't. What are you really looking for?

I'm sorry you haven't found it here. I will never respond to another of your posts, and I'm sure there are a lot of us here who feel the same. It's a waste of our time. You never take the time to examine what you've written or really look at your writing.

While I understand your feelings about rejection, I don't understand your negative attitude. We've all been rejected, over and over again. It's part of the process.

You have to have a thick skin in this industry.

Again, I wish you the best.

elindsen
07-19-2010, 07:32 AM
texas-ill just say i feel youve havent looked much into what ive posted. thanks to helpful folks my query is aat its best and noot even at its potential. my ms is soooo much stronger. its imposssiible to do everything everyone suuggests because oof opinions but i consider everything.



callalily-thanks for your words

suki
07-19-2010, 07:44 AM
Well, elindson, if you are serious about being query ready, you need more betas.

But you're probably having trouble finding betas because they go and check out your work in SYW and see it's not even close to ready. And they can't know how much you have improved it already because you haven't posted any of the improved manuscript.

So, my suggestion would be to post some of the current version of your manuscript in SYW. That would show potential betas the current state of the manuscript and that you have improved and are interested in meaningful critique.

People will be much more willing to beta for you if they can see your improvement, and, more importantly, can see you have a good attitude about wanting to improve. So, post some of the improved manuscript in SYW and show potential betas what it looks like.

It'll also help you in threads like this one, because people will be able to actually see your improvement.

good luck.

~suki

ILSinTexas
07-19-2010, 07:48 AM
That's wonderful! I'd love to hear that some agents have asked for pages. Lots of luckl

ILS

elindsen
07-19-2010, 08:05 AM
ok suki...ill probably post in a week or so.

kurzon
07-30-2010, 09:17 AM
Okay, I'll never give up writing, its in my blood. But I seem to have absolutely no luck with finding representation.

...

I'm not sure if I'm going through the typical rejection depression but I'm really feeling like I'm never meant to be published, except by Publish America.

...

So by breaking these rules am I signing my own death warrant in the publishing world? Is it still exceptable to write kind of slangish?

As others above have said, whatever else you do, don't go near outfits like Publish America. If you want to give self-publishing a run, go to Lulu or CreateSpace or somewhere which is not openly out to wring every cent out of your pocket.

However, hold off on self-publishing. Not because it's a bad option, but because traditional publishing is a better option. Traditional publishing means money flowing to you not from you, and professional help in editing and covers and infinitely more chance of your book ending up in bookstores, and receiving reviews.

Breaking into traditional publishing is a slow, painful business and you may not be able to do it. But I do recommend making the attempt for at least five years (if not longer). Because during this time you will grow as a writer, and you'll either improve to the point of finally being able to break in, or you'll at least have a much better book if you go to self-publishing.

Many will advise you to never self-publish, but I won't push this all or nothing stance. I think it's better to give the traditional channels a good, extended attempt (not with only one or two books, but with three or four or more), and then sit back and evaluate. Consider all the negatives which come with self-publishing - people will look down on you, you'll be shelling out money (though not very much with the most basic options), and very few people will be interested in reading you. Then consider the positives - actual books on your shelf, something to give the friends who won't read in MS form, and no further need to engage with all the negativity of the submission process.

Only you can decide which is better for you, but I do think it's a decision best made after five to ten years of attempting the traditional route.


Okay, I'll never give up writing, its in my blood.
Is it still exceptable to write kind of slangish?

A good writer can make almost any departure from 'the rules' work, but there's a difference between breaking grammar rules and making spelling errors and misusing words without realising it.

Like a Picasso, it's best to firmly ground yourself in traditional techniques, before attempting to paint an abstract variation. Your post here, if it was a submission, would leap out to any agent/editor who spots your misuse of 'its', the mispelled words, and using 'exceptable' (not a word) instead of 'acceptable'. It's possible that the rejections you're receiving now will turn into acceptances if you can develop enough to spot other errors in your work.

Which is why I always advise giving such decisions a little time before taking the leap. Every day you write, you become a better writer. Give yourself a chance to be as good as you think you're going to get.

SarahMacManus
08-07-2010, 12:38 AM
You're better off self-publishing than going through PublishAmerica.

There are also small publishers that might be interested, many are springing up and there seems to be one for every genre.

Peggy Blair
08-12-2010, 09:37 PM
I had well over 100 rejections before I finally got some traction. I've posted my recent experiences, and advice for newbies like me, in a blog at www.peggyblair.wordpress.com (http://www.peggyblair.wordpress.com/)


Don't give up.

Mr. Anonymous
08-13-2010, 01:53 AM
One novel and a picture book is way too early to give up on getting published. I've written around 225-250k words and I've only JUST managed to get a flash story accepted for publication by an online literary magazine. That is my only pub thus far. I'm querying my third novel, and about 10k into writing my fourth.