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SaraP
07-07-2010, 07:12 PM
Ok, so here's what I thought:

A lot of people know Los Angeles means The Angels in spanish. Fewer people know the name Linda means Beautiful in portuguese (and I'm guessing in spanish too?).

The idea is to post a word in any language that we know to have a different meaning in another language and have everyone else guess what the new meaning is. Clues would be given. Whoever guesses correctly is not obligated to post a new challenge, but it would be appreciated. Googlefu won't be allowed of course, but as we have no way of knowing whether people cheated or not, we would just make the pledge not to do it.

What do you all think?

Lauretta
07-07-2010, 07:14 PM
Me likez it :D
Thinking of a word now...

Xelebes
07-07-2010, 09:09 PM
An easy one: Mark

SaraP
07-07-2010, 09:16 PM
Mark, the english name? You have to say what the meaning is in the original language and the language in which the word has an alternative meaning, as well as provide a clue.

For example:

Everyone knows the actor Mel Gibson. Does anyone know what Mel means in portuguese? Let's just say this sweet stuff is very common.

ETA: by golly, my brain is asleep today. I've edited this post way too many times already.

Liosse de Velishaf
07-07-2010, 09:21 PM
"Mel" is honey?

Kitty Pryde
07-07-2010, 09:25 PM
OK, I just read a sci-fi book with two small and obscure jokes in it. The first was that one model of flying aircar was named the "Laputa"--after the flying island in Gulliver's Travels.

The second joke was a small news item reporting that the "Laputa" had awful sales in Spanish-speaking countries. :D

SaraP
07-07-2010, 09:26 PM
Liosse, did you know that or did you just guess? :D

Yeah, Honey Gibson - fitting, no? LOL!

Kitty - LOL! Let's just say that when we talk about The Castle in the Sky movie, we have to make sure we say that name with the english accent. ;)

A new one:

Birra is beer in italian, yet I wouldn't want my kid to have a portuguese birra either. Guess away!

Liosse de Velishaf
07-07-2010, 09:40 PM
Liosse, did you know that or did you just guess? :D

Yeah, Honey Gibson - fitting, no? LOL!

Kitty - LOL! Let's just say that when we talk about The Castle in the Sky movie, we have to make sure we say that name with the english accent. ;)

A new one:

Birra is beer in italian, yet I wouldn't want my kid to have a portuguese birra either. Guess away!


I knew. "mel/mellis" in Latin, "miele" in Italian, and "miel" in French and Spanish.

Xelebes
07-08-2010, 12:55 AM
I knew. "mel/mellis" in Latin, "miele" in Italian, and "miel" in French and Spanish.

Melissa (honey-bee and personifiation) in Greek.

Dawnstorm
07-08-2010, 11:46 AM
OK, I just read a sci-fi book with two small and obscure jokes in it. The first was that one model of flying aircar was named the "Laputa"--after the flying island in Gulliver's Travels.

The second joke was a small news item reporting that the "Laputa" had awful sales in Spanish-speaking countries. :D

Would it really have awful sales, I wonder? It could be a cult hit.

I'm guessing La Puta = (female) prostitute. It's similar in Italian, so...

***

Btw, don't offer Germans a "gift". They won't like it.

poetinahat
07-08-2010, 12:02 PM
Before setting off on our own honeymoon, I was amused to learn that "honeymoon", in Italian, is "luna di miele" - same expression!

Liosse de Velishaf
07-08-2010, 01:25 PM
Would it really have awful sales, I wonder? It could be a cult hit.

I'm guessing La Puta = (female) prostitute. It's similar in Italian, so...

***

Btw, don't offer Germans a "gift". They won't like it.


You're right, KP.

I guess "Laputa: Castle in the Sky" wouldn't sell very well either, in Spanish-speaking countries. lol

SaraP
07-08-2010, 01:40 PM
Puta is not a nice word in portuguese either - quite a derogatory term. The funny thing is the male version - Puto - is very very common and means kid (applied to either a boy or a group of kids, but never just to girls).

Honeymoon translates into Lua de Mel in portuguese as well.

As for the word I posted, Birra, here's another clue: it is most often associated with pouting kids, but adults aren't exempt from throwing one every now and then. ;)

Liosse de Velishaf
07-08-2010, 01:48 PM
Puta is not a nice word in portuguese either - quite a derogatory term. The funny thing is the male version - Puto - is very very common and means kid (applied to either a boy or a group of kids, but never just to girls).

Honeymoon translates into Lua de Mel in portuguese as well.

As for the word I posted, Birra, here's another clue: it is most often associated with pouting kids, but adults aren't exempt from throwing one every now and then. ;)


Oh, are we still on that? Tantrum.

SaraP
07-08-2010, 02:02 PM
Tantrum it is!

And keeping with the italian to portuguese theme ...

Burro is butter, but in Portugal you wouldn't want to spread it on bread. That would be animal cruelty!

MissMacchiato
07-08-2010, 05:30 PM
burro is a donkey :)

in Italian, morbido is something you'd want your clothes to be - nothing like what it means in english!

Diver
07-08-2010, 06:03 PM
burro is a donkey :)

in Italian, morbido is something you'd want your clothes to be - nothing like what it means in english!

... nor in spanish.

Another example would be exquisito, meaning exquisite in spanish. I was told to avoid using this word to describe food in Brasil.

maxmordon
07-08-2010, 09:41 PM
Puta is not a nice word in portuguese either - quite a derogatory term. The funny thing is the male version - Puto - is very very common and means kid (applied to either a boy or a group of kids, but never just to girls).

Puto in Spanish does not only describes a manwhore, but used as a noun it's an insult equivalent to "homo".

There's this word in Spanish, especially Venezuelan spanish means a rundown bus, but if you ask for a "buseta" in Portuguese it will surely earn you a slap from a woman and not an indication the bus stop!

truelyana
07-08-2010, 09:55 PM
... nor in spanish.

Another example would be exquisito, meaning exquisite in spanish. I was told to avoid using this word to describe food in Brasil.

In Portuguese 'exquisito' means strange, so that probably would explain something. It's amazing the meaning of words and the way they are used through the languages!

Griesmeel
08-09-2010, 04:49 AM
I think it was the Chevrolet Nova that didn't sell very well in Latin America. :)

Liosse de Velishaf
08-09-2010, 05:47 AM
I think it was the Chevrolet Nova that didn't sell very well in Latin America. :)
hehe...

Tocotin
08-09-2010, 07:41 AM
Btw, don't offer Germans a "gift". They won't like it.

Isn't "gift" something like "poison" in German? I once had a pin with skull and crossbones and the word "gift" on it. Liked it a lot.

Dawnstorm
08-09-2010, 09:36 AM
Isn't "gift" something like "poison" in German?

Yup, it's "poison". :)

Ehab.Ahmed
08-09-2010, 01:16 PM
Can anyone guess what "puta" means in Japanese? It's actually "buta" in Japanese, but it's close, lol. Hint: an animal that can't physically look at the sky.

mattias
08-09-2010, 01:18 PM
Mark means "property" or "land" in Swedish, as in "50 acres of forest". Using definite article, it also means the surface of the Earth.

SaraP
08-09-2010, 08:39 PM
Can anyone guess what "puta" means in Japanese? It's actually "buta" in Japanese, but it's close, lol. Hint: an animal that can't physically look at the sky.

I know this one, but I'm not telling. :D

Gabby
08-09-2010, 11:27 PM
Ooo I know! A "buta" is a pig in Japanese. Some people from the Kansai area of Japan also pronounce Buddha with a strong D, so strong it sounds like T.... so it can also be that ;)

maxmordon
08-09-2010, 11:33 PM
The parents of my uncle's wife are Polish and during their trip to Venezuela, the guide told me to hold themselves, since some fierce curves ("curvas" in Spanish) were coming, but after so many waiting some twisted roads, the old Polish husband was deeply disappointed, why he was after they passed the curves?

Ehab.Ahmed
08-10-2010, 12:12 AM
True, Gabby. That bit about Buddha is very interesting! Thanks for sharing :)

Did you guess it right, Sara? lmao.

SaraP
08-10-2010, 12:51 AM
Yup. You mentioned it in the japanese thread. :D

Ehab.Ahmed
08-10-2010, 12:35 PM
I did? Must've slipped my mind :tongue. Actually, I think I mentioned it in the Zombie Puta thread, lol.

Tocotin
08-11-2010, 08:23 AM
The parents of my uncle's wife are Polish and during their trip to Venezuela, the guide told me to hold themselves, since some fierce curves ("curvas" in Spanish) were coming, but after so many waiting some twisted roads, the old Polish husband was deeply disappointed, why he was after they passed the curves?

Because "kurwa" (pronounced curva) in Polish is the same as "puta" in Spanish? :troll


A "buta" is a pig in Japanese. Some people from the Kansai area of Japan also pronounce Buddha with a strong D, so strong it sounds like T.... so it can also be that

Hmm it's tricky. "Buddha" in Japanese has the "d" (sometimes sounding like "t") geminated or doubled, so it wouldn't sound like "buta".

Ehab.Ahmed
08-11-2010, 12:26 PM
Kansai area... Is that where they use that dialect? The one where ja becomes ya.

maxmordon
08-12-2010, 08:57 PM
Because "kurwa" (pronounced curva) in Polish is the same as "puta" in Spanish? :troll

Yeah. you got it right.

Gabby
08-12-2010, 10:31 PM
When I lived in Japan, my Japanese mom was from Tokyo, my Japanes dad from Kyoto. We lived in Tokyo, but dad retained his accent.

When I visited Kyoto, I called them to say hi. Japanese dad got on the phone and said, "You gotta visit Nara. Is real close, and the butta there is gigantic!"

I repeated, "The butta? Er, a giant butta? Sure, I'll keep it in mind."
A giant pig. Riiight. Maybe it was a shrine or something. After that, I asked Japanese mom - she explained about the Buddha statue, which is gigantic and awesome.

But otousan did pronounce the "d" so strongly it sounded butta. Granted, not buta, but very very close enough!

Xelebes
09-14-2010, 01:07 AM
New round: This sometimes-crude English word is an innocuous, philematic word in Hungarian when spoken. What is the English word and what does the homophone mean in Hungarian?

SaraP
09-14-2010, 01:20 AM
Hmmmm, sounds intriguing. There is a post on the hungarian thread about a word that goes the other way around: apparently innocent in english, you shouldn't say it in Hungary.

delaford321
09-14-2010, 04:15 AM
The name "Karen" means "beautiful" in Japanese (although different pronunciation!)

Laquesi
09-19-2010, 04:43 PM
There's this word in Spanish, especially Venezuelan spanish means a rundown bus, but if you ask for a "buseta" in Portuguese it will surely earn you a slap from a woman and not an indication the bus stop!

I know a funny story about this, a friend witnessed it: some Argentinians where here in Brazil and the bus was just passing by the stop. They started running like crazy on the street yelling "corre la buseta, corre la buseta". There was a woman at the bus stop, and she was so scared she ran away. The guys just stood there, not understanding anything, and missed their bus, lol. I felt sorry for the woman, though. I'd probably run away too. :P

Laquesi
09-19-2010, 04:53 PM
No idea on the Hungarian one.
Can anyone guess this? A friend moved to Italy. He went to college carrying a notebook with a huge sticker on it that read 'Fica', after an international film festival that takes place in my home state every year. The word 'fica', in Portuguese, also means 'stay'. But in Italian, it's a vulgar term. Why did all my friend's classmates laugh and give him a new nickname?

Griesmeel
09-19-2010, 05:01 PM
Thanks for the heads up, I'll have one less chance of shocking my female Portuguese teacher. :)

The other one: poo? As from feces?
My apologies for if anyone feels I just stunk the place up. :)

Laquesi
09-20-2010, 11:58 PM
The other one: poo? As from feces?
My apologies for if anyone feels I just stunk the place up. :)

Haha, no. Hint: same as the 'bus' thing. :)