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Freelancer
07-07-2010, 06:21 AM
Kíváncsi vagyok, hogy mennyi kedves honfitárs képviselteti magát az AW-n. Remélhetőleg nem vagyok egyedül, de majd kiderül.

További szép jó estét. :)

MissJones89
09-03-2010, 10:59 AM
I have a question for you Hungarians (or Hungarian speakers):

How do you say: I love you and my little thief ?

backslashbaby
09-03-2010, 04:22 PM
I caught the jó estét :D And it makes me happy, missing Baja and Budapest.

Jó napot kívánok :)

Otherwise I used German or English. Hungarian is darned hard!

Freelancer
09-03-2010, 05:56 PM
I love you and my little thief "Szeretlek téged (I love you) és a kis tolvajomat (and my little thief)."

Well. If that thief is that thief... the stealing thief, this is the exact translation for your sentence (I don't know any other meaning of that word. Maybe you thought for something else in english, but I don't see any sense in this sentence (With the exception if that little thief is a nickname.). May I ask what does that little thief if meaning in your sentence?


missing Baja and Budapest.And Hungary is missing you. :)


Jó napot kívánokNeked is nagyon szép napot kivánok, Backslash! ;)

MissJones89
09-05-2010, 03:07 PM
"Szeretlek téged (I love you) és a kis tolvajomat (and my little thief)."

Well. If that thief is that thief... the stealing thief, this is the exact translation for your sentence (I don't know any other meaning of that word. Maybe you thought for something else in english, but I don't see any sense in this sentence (With the exception if that little thief is a nickname.). May I ask what does that little thief if meaning in your sentence?

Is it possible to just say "Szeretlek" or do you need both words?
And my little thief is meant as an endearing nickname for a young woman, who is a thief. Does that change anything?
I was thinking that maybe little thief would suffice sometimes, so what would that be? (Can't really tell which words mean what. Other than tolvajomat which must be thief, right? ;))

Thanks! :)

Freelancer
09-05-2010, 04:49 PM
Actually the word "Szeretlek", such as every other word in the Hungarian grammar system can be used on various and dozens of ways as it's always depending from the situation itself.

I love you = Én szeretlek téged (1:1 translation, I = Én, Love = Szeret, You = Te. Now in the Hungarian grammar different situations are giving different endings to the words, which is making every word, every situation easier to understand, even without descriptions (In English you must describe everything with I, You, He/she/it, this and that, etc, etc...). In Hungarian the words are changing, transforming for every possible situation. This is making Hungarian a bit more advanced language then most of the others and the primary reason why this is the one of the very few languages where we don't have to call people on their names so many times in dialogues (Unlike in English where you're calling everyone on their name rapidly in a conversation, or you must refering at the other person continuously as "you" in a dialogue. This is not necessary in Hungarian.).

Now, here we can leave the "Én" from the translation, because you're telling this sentence to a person directly. Leaving this word is immediately changing "Szeret" to "Szeretlek", which is making it much more personal, plus the "Én" also can be abandonned as it's already appears in this "Szeretlek" as the word itself get it's "I" personal expansion. "Téged" also can be abandonned as the word "Szeretlek" is not just containing the "I = Én", but it's also containing the "you = te", which in this language is rather "téged" due to the structure of the sentence.

So in overall, due to the structure of the sentence, while the 1:1 translation above is correct, as your approach to this sentence is full with emotions, your approach is also correct. So, the translation also can be this, just as you wrote...

I love you = Szeretlek (Also a 1 by 1 translation, but it's the much more personal one).

The first translation above is the 1:1, the formal, the one below is the one full with emotions. But ONLY in that case if want to use it as a seperate sentence. But see the edit part below, why you can't use it on this way, without the "téged".


And my little thief is meant as an endearing nickname for a young woman, who is a thief. Does that change anything?Nope. In this case the translation is correct for that part.


Other than tolvajomat which must be thief, right?Actually tolvaj = thief. "Tolvajomat" can be translated as "My thief", but as the words are transforming again to leave all the my, yours, etc, etc... it's already containing "My" in the transformed words. So "tolvajomat" is the correct translation, but it's not meaning "Thief", but it's "My thief" in general. And the little = kis.

But there are various ways to translate this as if you want to make it to a mocking, "My little thief"'s translation is already "Tolvajocskám", which is already containing "My", "Little" and "Thief" in this one word. But this is the mocking, have a quite different, mocking approach in it's tone, so don't use this one.

EDIT: One last thing what I forgot. As you're using "Szeretlek" in an expanded sentence where you're also referring to someone else too, there you have two + one options.

1. "Szeretlek téged és a kis tolvajomat." (In this version you must use the formal as you don't want to give different love to the two different person. You're not making difference between the first person and the little thief. In this case the formal should be applied with the word, "téged".

2. "Szeretlek, és a kis tolvajomat is." (That comma is necessary if you want to leave the word "téged". The comma is giving a weight for the first part, the "szeretlek", and then you can leave "téged". But only in this case if you're intending to use the sentence on the way you planned. At the end, the "is" is meaning "too". So the pure translation for this second option is "I love you... and my little thief too.". If you want the 1:1 translation, you must use the "téged" if you want the sentence to sound really nice and personal for both person. In this second version the first person gets much more love via the sentence and the "little thief" gets a "secondary", less personal, rather formal love.).

Bonus version. The possible expansion is in red, but as we're using some phrase a bit different, the red are not necessary in this version at all (If the reader already knows who the other in the "both".).

"Szeretlek mindkettőtöket; téged és a kis tolvajomat is."
Dry translation: "I love you both; you and my little thief."

Essence: no difference between the two person, same love applies for both, and it's also personal. But as I wrote above, the reader must know who to you refer in this sentence. As there are two person mentioned, the "Szeretlek mindkettőtöket" is good.

MissJones89
09-06-2010, 02:27 PM
Thank you so much for helping me out, Freelancer! :) Still have a few questions, though, if you don't mind..


I love you = Szeretlek (Also a 1 by 1 translation, but it's the much more personal one).

So if a guy were to say "see you later sweetie, love you" (or something similar but with "love you" at the end) to his girlfriend, he could say:
"See you later sweetie, szeretlek"?
Or would szeretlek have to be in a sentence on its own?


Actually tolvaj = thief. "Tolvajomat" can be translated as "My thief", but as the words are transforming again to leave all the my, yours, etc, etc... it's already containing "My" in the transformed words. So "tolvajomat" is the correct translation, but it's not meaning "Thief", but it's "My thief" in general. And the little = kis.

Is it possible to say e.g.: "You're crazy, kis tolvajomat" - meaning you're crazy, my little thief ? And could the guy use kis tolvajomat in a sentence on its own where it would still mean "my little thief"?


But there are various ways to translate this as if you want to make it to a mocking, "My little thief"'s translation is already "Tolvajocskám", which is already containing "My", "Little" and "Thief" in this one word. But this is the mocking, have a quite different, mocking approach in it's tone, so don't use this one.

Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!

Another quick question, Hungarians always roll on the "r" sound, right?

Freelancer
09-06-2010, 03:59 PM
Thank you so much for helping me out, Freelancer! :) Still have a few questions, though, if you don't mind..
No problem.


So if a guy were to say "see you later sweetie, love you" (or something similar but with "love you" at the end) to his girlfriend, he could say: "See you later sweetie, szeretlek"?
Or would szeretlek have to be in a sentence on its own? Yes. It should be in a different sentence. The 1:1 translation is:

"Később találkozunk szívem. Szeretlek."

We used to divide the sentence to two to give much more weight for the word "I love you".


Is it possible to say e.g.: "You're crazy, kis tolvajomat" - meaning you're crazy, my little thief ? And could the guy use kis tolvajomat in a sentence on its own where it would still mean "my little thief"?No. In this case the "Kis tolvajomat" is changing to "Kis tolvajom", because of the surrounding environment. The translation for this sentence is: "Őrült vagy kis tolvajom.", but it sounds a bit strange, even on Hungarian, so the order of the sentence should be changed.

So the translation for this: "Te kis tolvajom, őrült vagy." It sounds a bit cynic even on Hungarian, but this is the correct translation.


Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!Yeah, it can be hard, but it's a very flexible language. It sounds hard and also hard to speak because of the different alphabet. English is using 26 letters in the alphabet, while we're using 44.


Another quick question, Hungarians always roll on the "r" sound, right?Only if you speak with a burr. :D Not at all. Unlike other languages, the Hungarian language is not relies on any sound, such as R or others. The sounding is also flexible because the "tone of the words" are coming from the word, from the sentence structure or even from the tone of the sentence itself.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. :)

Tepelus
09-07-2010, 04:55 AM
Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!



I wanted to learn Hungarian once upon a time, but it's way to confusing for me, plus I don't know any Hungarians to help me out. I tried Romanian, learned some because I was married to a Romanian for a few years (things didn't work out) but couldn't grasp it very well. I did learn a few curse words...lol, but since it's been a few years I don't remember much. I just can't seem to grasp learning another language.

Oh, and Freelancer, you and Backslash may get some translation questions from me as well in the future for my WIP. ;)

MissJones89
09-07-2010, 06:19 PM
Yes. It should be in a different sentence. The 1:1 translation is:

"Később találkozunk szívem. Szeretlek."

We used to divide the sentence to two to give much more weight for the word "I love you".

The MC's boyfriend is half Hungarian/half American. So I'm thinking of having him use a few words/phrases in Hungarian in an English sentence. But he would still use Szeretlek in a sentence on its own, right?
How would he say: "I love you, little thief" in Hungarian?


No. In this case the "Kis tolvajomat" is changing to "Kis tolvajom", because of the surrounding environment. The translation for this sentence is: "Őrült vagy kis tolvajom.", but it sounds a bit strange, even on Hungarian, so the order of the sentence should be changed.
So the translation for this: "Te kis tolvajom, őrült vagy." It sounds a bit cynic even on Hungarian, but this is the correct translation.

So maybe that doesn't really work. Cynic wasn't really what I was aiming for ;)


Yeah, it can be hard, but it's a very flexible language. It sounds hard and also hard to speak because of the different alphabet. English is using 26 letters in the alphabet, while we're using 44.

WOW! 44 letters, that's a lot! I guess they give the language a lot of nuances and make it really complicated for a non-native speaker to learn.
We have 28 in Danish, but from what I've heard it's an extremely difficult language to learn as well.


Only if you speak with a burr. :D Not at all. Unlike other languages, the Hungarian language is not relies on any sound, such as R or others. The sounding is also flexible because the "tone of the words" are coming from the word, from the sentence structure or even from the tone of the sentence itself.
So if you have a word with an r sound in it, you wouldn't roll on it? Or you could, but you wouldn't have to?
Say, if a boy spent most of his childhood speaking Hungarian, would it seem odd if he rolled on the r's when speaking English?

backslashbaby
09-07-2010, 11:28 PM
In my experience (which means no actual linguistic training), the r comes from a different part of the mouth, but it's not a rolled r. It's not like a Spanish, French, or German r, I can say with confidence. Dialects may matter; dunno :)

Freelancer
09-09-2010, 09:11 PM
The MC's boyfriend is half Hungarian/half American. So I'm thinking of having him use a few words/phrases in Hungarian in an English sentence. But he would still use Szeretlek in a sentence on its own, right?
How would he say: "I love you, little thief" in Hungarian?
Yep. We used to use it in a standalone sentence. There are few exceptions when we're adding some kind nick after it.

"Szeretlek drágám." = I love you darling.
"Szeretlek szívem." = I love you sweetheart.

But in standard cases it's used to be a stand alone sentence, simply "Szeretlek.".

The major problem when someone, a non-Hungarian is trying to use Hungarian phrases, based on English phrases... they're trying to translate the English phrases to Hungarian. That's not working as we have quite different phrases which may sound awkward in English (My Canadian co-writer/editor also used to ask what does it really mean as in English those sentences sounds weird. And her husband's family is also Hungarian, so she is used to it.).

If you need phrases, list a few in English and I'll try to write some similar in Hungarian, which are not going to be translations, rather their Hungarian matches. Or if you want dialogues, write me those sentences in English and I'm gladly translate them to Hungarian.


WOW! 44 letters, that's a lot! I guess they give the language a lot of nuances and make it really complicated for a non-native speaker to learn.Actually we give the language a lot of nuances. I directly wrote we as I'm also a Hungarian. :) But it's not that complicated at all. At least not for a Native Hungarian. The translations used to be hard as we have quite more words for many things that cannot be translated for example to English at all.


Say, if a boy spent most of his childhood speaking Hungarian, would it seem odd if he rolled on the r's when speaking English?Nope. That's Russian. I'm a native Hungarian speaker and I have American and British English accent when I'm speaking in English (It's depending from my mood as I can change my accent anytime.). Our language is giving a chance to have a chance to "emulate" the accents of other languages. i.e. I can speak in English with Russian accent too. Now that accent is using heavy Rs. We used to speak with heavy Rs if we want to, but it's not depending from the dialect or from our language. It's depending from our mood. :)


In my experience (which means no actual linguistic training), the r comes from a different part of the mouth, but it's not a rolled r. It's not like a Spanish, French, or German r, I can say with confidence. Dialects may matter; dunno :)The difference is... English speakers are using R, just as they're pronouncing the word "ARE". Our R sounds as "AIR".


Oh, and Freelancer, you and Backslash may get some translation questions from me as well in the future for my WIP. ;)Not a problem Tepelus. I'll be here. :)

SaraP
09-09-2010, 09:27 PM
About the 44 letters in the alphabet ... I'm curious: do you count the á as a separate letter from the a, for example? Is that why you have so many?

Freelancer
09-09-2010, 09:34 PM
Yes. This is our alphabet...

a, á, b, c, cs, d, dz, dzs, e, é, f, g, gy, h, i, í, j, k, l, ly, m, n, ny, o, ó, ö, ő, p, q, r, s, sz, t, ty, u, ú, ü, ű, v, w, x, y, z, zs

Also ancient Hungarian using a bit different alphabet and quite different letters. In that case the words and sentences must be read from right to left, but that's a different story. The alphabet above applies for modern Hungarian with Latin letters, words and sentences must be read from left to right, but sometimes we're using ancient Hungarian too.

SaraP
09-09-2010, 09:48 PM
Interesting.

We don't count letters with accents as separate letters, otherwise we would have about 38 letters in our alphabet instead of just 23. Again, out of curiosity, do they all have different names?

Freelancer
09-09-2010, 10:20 PM
They're not different accents. They sounds different and they have different purpose. Actually these 44 letters are that a human mouth effectively can form and give a voice, a tone for it. i.e. English is using more letters to shape a single letter tone. We're using one letter for each of these tones.

Here is an example: "Yes." That S at the end is a different "S" tone than the "S" tone what you use in "Sure.". The "S" tone in "Yes" is actually our "SZ" letter. The "S" in "Sure" is a different "S" tone which is our "S" tone and letter. With this all of our words are seems as they sounds in Hungarian. In English, written words may sound different as they seems due to the lack of those letters what we have.

Other example: The pronunciation of Germany... that G sounds as "DZS" in pronunciation, while the G in Goal is our "G" tone and letter. The two or more "E" in Eeeek is our "Í" as it's one tone again, so we're using one letter for it. The CH in Cherry is our "CS". You're using two different letters for that one, while we're using one letter for that tone.

The only thing that we're not listing in our alphabet are the very rare letters, such as CCS, GGY, LLY, NNY, SSZ, TTY, TZ. These are rare letters in any tone and we're calling them as expansions of the original letters, such as CS, GY, LY, NY, etc, etc... So these are not part of our alphabet, but may appear in our words in very rare cases. They're showing you're expanding the tone in that word and it's also making difference between two words with similar pronunciation. Such as Megy (To go) or Meggy (Cherry / Sour Cherry).

MissJones89
09-10-2010, 05:28 PM
Yep. We used to use it in a standalone sentence. There are few exceptions when we're adding some kind nick after it.

"Szeretlek drágám." = I love you darling.
"Szeretlek szívem." = I love you sweetheart.

But in standard cases it's used to be a stand alone sentence, simply "Szeretlek.".

Oh, that's great! I think I'll use both kinds :)



The major problem when someone, a non-Hungarian is trying to use Hungarian phrases, based on English phrases... they're trying to translate the English phrases to Hungarian. That's not working as we have quite different phrases which may sound awkward in English (My Canadian co-writer/editor also used to ask what does it really mean as in English those sentences sounds weird. And her husband's family is also Hungarian, so she is used to it.).

If you need phrases, list a few in English and I'll try to write some similar in Hungarian, which are not going to be translations, rather their Hungarian matches. Or if you want dialogues, write me those sentences in English and I'm gladly translate them to Hungarian.

Thanks a lot! I will look at my story and see if there are any place where I could add some Hungarian sentences instead. I have a feeling it would add more depth to a half-Hungarian character if he actually speaks a little Hungarian at some point - or is that just me?


Nope. That's Russian. I'm a native Hungarian speaker and I have American and British English accent when I'm speaking in English (It's depending from my mood as I can change my accent anytime.). Our language is giving a chance to have a chance to "emulate" the accents of other languages. i.e. I can speak in English with Russian accent too. Now that accent is using heavy Rs. We used to speak with heavy Rs if we want to, but it's not depending from the dialect or from our language. It's depending from our mood. :)

Wow, multiple accents! That's pretty cool! So if a Hungarian rolled on the 'r', it would be a deliberate choice? But it wouldn't be an effort for you?


They're not different accents. They sounds different and they have different purpose. Actually these 44 letters are that a human mouth effectively can form and give a voice, a tone for it. i.e. English is using more letters to shape a single letter tone. We're using one letter for each of these tones.

Here is an example: "Yes." That S at the end is a different "S" tone than the "S" tone what you use in "Sure.". The "S" tone in "Yes" is actually our "SZ" letter. The "S" in "Sure" is a different "S" tone which is our "S" tone and letter. With this all of our words are seems as they sounds in Hungarian. In English, written words may sound different as they seems due to the lack of those letters what we have.

Other example: The pronunciation of Germany... that G sounds as "DZS" in pronunciation, while the G in Goal is our "G" tone and letter. The two or more "E" in Eeeek is our "Í" as it's one tone again, so we're using one letter for it. The CH in Cherry is our "CS". You're using two different letters for that one, while we're using one letter for that tone.

The only thing that we're not listing in our alphabet are the very rare letters, such as CCS, GGY, LLY, NNY, SSZ, TTY, TZ. These are rare letters in any tone and we're calling them as expansions of the original letters, such as CS, GY, LY, NY, etc, etc... So these are not part of our alphabet, but may appear in our words in very rare cases. They're showing you're expanding the tone in that word and it's also making difference between two words with similar pronunciation. Such as Megy (To go) or Meggy (Cherry / Sour Cherry).

Wouldn't that make Hungarian easier to read and speak as soon as a person had learned all the sounds in the alphabet?
In Danish, we have a lot of words that are spelled different compared to the pronunciation. But if each of your letters only represent one sound, then it would make it way easier to pronounce the words correctly, right?

This is all really interesting! I didn't really know anything about Hungarian until now ;)

Freelancer
09-12-2010, 07:46 PM
Thanks a lot! I will look at my story and see if there are any place where I could add some Hungarian sentences instead. I have a feeling it would add more depth to a half-Hungarian character if he actually speaks a little Hungarian at some point - or is that just me?
That would make your character life like. Hungarians are proud for their language and we used to use it in some cases, regardless we must speak on a different language. i.e. cursing is used to be in Hungarian as we have a bit larger arsenal. Or we used to revert sometimes to Hungarian when we can't find an appropriate word for something in a different language as that word is not existing in that language (I also used to do this sometimes, when I start to speak in English and when I arrive to a word what for there is no English word at all, then I accidentally revert back to Hungarian for that one word.). i.e. my novel's title, "Crystal Shade" is described with two words in English. In Hungarian we have one word for it, "Kristályárny", which is basically meaning the very same as "Crystal = Kristály", "Shade = Árny", yet we have one unique word to describe this.


Wow, multiple accents! That's pretty cool! So if a Hungarian rolled on the 'r', it would be a deliberate choice? But it wouldn't be an effort for you?It's not an effort as we're using the tones itself and that is giving us the chance to speak on different dialects and accents anytime. i.e. in Hungarian we used to speak sometimes with different accents for fun (My former girlfriend is always changed her accent when she reverted to her hilarious comedic presentation. It was not an effort for her, but she made it for fun.).


Wouldn't that make Hungarian easier to read and speak as soon as a person had learned all the sounds in the alphabet? Maybe. Actually the primary problem is that the mouth of non-Hungarian speakers must get used to shape these tones. For me it's easy, but it's my native language.


In Danish, we have a lot of words that are spelled different compared to the pronunciation. But if each of your letters only represent one sound, then it would make it way easier to pronounce the words correctly, right?Same as above. Maybe. I can't tell you this with 100% as it's my native language. But I know few people, whose learned Hungarian and speak almost like a Hungarian. But non-natives has only 1-2% chance to speak as a native Hungarian due to the difficulty of the language. We can hear from the tone who is just learned this language and who is a speaking it as a native.


This is all really interesting! I didn't really know anything about Hungarian until now ;)We gladly speak about our culture. It's a beautiful and strange culture and the language is a unique one, has no similar at all. Some even call it exotic i.e. My Spanish friends used to call it as an exotic language, while I call theirs as an exotic one. So it depends from our point of view, but we used to be proud for who we're.

backslashbaby
09-13-2010, 03:10 AM
The pronunciation is so hard for me, but there is not the leeway you'll find in some other languages. If you are off a bit, it must sound entirely different to Hungarian ears.

Take the town I lived in during the week. Baja. 4 letters. But you have to say the A's with your mouth held entirely differently than in English or folks will ask you to repeat several times. 4 letters, lol :D

The a isn't far off from how you say the a in father. But you must hold your mouth differently and make a stronger sound. I don't think we have the equivalent sound at all. It sounds enough like father to me, lol ;)

If you use the a in father to say 'France' in French, folks still understand it. Not so, Hungarian.

MissJones89
09-13-2010, 11:38 PM
That would make your character life like. Hungarians are proud for their language and we used to use it in some cases, regardless we must speak on a different language. i.e. cursing is used to be in Hungarian as we have a bit larger arsenal. Or we used to revert sometimes to Hungarian when we can't find an appropriate word for something in a different language as that word is not existing in that language (I also used to do this sometimes, when I start to speak in English and when I arrive to a word what for there is no English word at all, then I accidentally revert back to Hungarian for that one word.). i.e. my novel's title, "Crystal Shade" is described with two words in English. In Hungarian we have one word for it, "Kristályárny", which is basically meaning the very same as "Crystal = Kristály", "Shade = Árny", yet we have one unique word to describe this.

I actually really like the idea of swearing in Hungarian! That'd definitely fit with the character's personality.
Maybe you could provide some words/phrases equivalent to "fuck", "shit" and "go to hell"?


It's not an effort as we're using the tones itself and that is giving us the chance to speak on different dialects and accents anytime. i.e. in Hungarian we used to speak sometimes with different accents for fun (My former girlfriend is always changed her accent when she reverted to her hilarious comedic presentation. It was not an effort for her, but she made it for fun.).

That's so awesome! I wish I could choose my accent, depending on the situation/mood.


Same as above. Maybe. I can't tell you this with 100% as it's my native language. But I know few people, whose learned Hungarian and speak almost like a Hungarian. But non-natives has only 1-2% chance to speak as a native Hungarian due to the difficulty of the language. We can hear from the tone who is just learned this language and who is a speaking it as a native.

So it isn't really easy at all to learn, haha. But it must be a fun challenge to try and form the different sounds in your mouth when you're not a native speaker.


We gladly speak about our culture. It's a beautiful and strange culture and the language is a unique one, has no similar at all. Some even call it exotic i.e. My Spanish friends used to call it as an exotic language, while I call theirs as an exotic one. So it depends from our point of view, but we used to be proud for who we're.

What in particular is very Hungarian? And what are you proud of?


The pronunciation is so hard for me, but there is not the leeway you'll find in some other languages. If you are off a bit, it must sound entirely different to Hungarian ears.

Take the town I lived in during the week. Baja. 4 letters. But you have to say the A's with your mouth held entirely differently than in English or folks will ask you to repeat several times. 4 letters, lol :D

The a isn't far off from how you say the a in father. But you must hold your mouth differently and make a stronger sound. I don't think we have the equivalent sound at all. It sounds enough like father to me, lol ;)

If you use the a in father to say 'France' in French, folks still understand it. Not so, Hungarian.

But you speak some Hungarian then? Even if it's a really complex language ;)

backslashbaby
09-14-2010, 12:27 AM
I know a lot of names for food and groceries, lol! If you point randomly, you always get sausages :D I lived there too long for sausages every night ;)

I learned you don't say the English words 'bus' or 'cookie'. Especially 'bus'!

MissJones89
09-14-2010, 01:31 AM
I know a lot of names for food and groceries, lol! If you point randomly, you always get sausages :D I lived there too long for sausages every night ;)

I learned you don't say the English words 'bus' or 'cookie'. Especially 'bus'!

Haha! I guess too many sausages would make you learn some words for other kinds of food!

Why not bus and cookie?

backslashbaby
09-14-2010, 05:30 AM
You have to say 'Autobus' and still not pronounce the 'bus' part the English way because it means f**k or maybe a less extreme curseword for the same.

'Cookie' means penis. Or willy or something. Not so rude, just don't ask if they want one like one of my bosses did ;)

MissJones89
09-14-2010, 12:42 PM
You have to say 'Autobus' and still not pronounce the 'bus' part the English way because it means f**k or maybe a less extreme curseword for the same.

'Cookie' means penis. Or willy or something. Not so rude, just don't ask if they want one like one of my bosses did ;)

Haha! Your boss asked for a penis :D Did they stare at him in puzzlement?

backslashbaby
09-14-2010, 06:45 PM
:ROFL: It happened before I got there, but it had become a running joke by then. Every new person who didn't speak Hungarian (we had a lot of folks from the former Yugoslavia) was told to ask that boss something about cookies :D

I constantly asked the wrong people words in Hungarian, too. At first, I forgot that a huge proportion of the folks there didn't know Hungarian, either. We were very close to the border, during the conflicts. OTOH, many of them spoke Hungarian from their grandmother, maybe. All of those historically moving borders brought together some very different languages!

MissJones89
09-17-2010, 10:57 AM
:ROFL: It happened before I got there, but it had become a running joke by then. Every new person who didn't speak Hungarian (we had a lot of folks from the former Yugoslavia) was told to ask that boss something about cookies :D

I constantly asked the wrong people words in Hungarian, too. At first, I forgot that a huge proportion of the folks there didn't know Hungarian, either. We were very close to the border, during the conflicts. OTOH, many of them spoke Hungarian from their grandmother, maybe. All of those historically moving borders brought together some very different languages!

Ah, too bad! Must have been hilarious as a bystander! But at least you could tease him about it ;)

What were you doing there so close to the border?

backslashbaby
09-17-2010, 11:54 AM
My dad got asked to work for an American/European startup over there, and I came over and worked there part-time after he'd lived there a while :) It was a great experience! I love, love, love Hungarians :D

It being Hungary made all the difference in the world. It wasn't unsafe at all. It was amazing meeting so many folks who fled the fighting -- that's what the proximity to the border brought.

MissJones89
09-20-2010, 12:25 AM
Nice! I'd love to work in another country for a couple of years or something. Try it out, learn about the culture. Have you returned on vacation then?

Must have been a great feeling for the fledgings to be able to find security in Hungary.

backslashbaby
09-20-2010, 03:38 AM
Unfortunately, no :( But I couldn't get as far west as the UK and Ireland when I lived in Hungary, and I have been able to do those trips since my time in Eastern Europe.

Prague is incredibly lovely, too. I always recommend a Vienna/Budapest/Prague loop to folks if they can swing it. At very least Budpest if you're as close as Vienna!

MissJones89
09-20-2010, 10:56 AM
Well, you still have time to go back and visit :)

I'll definitely go see all those Eastern European countries at some point. I have heard so many good things about the three capitals you mention, as well as the ex-Yugoslavian countries.

backslashbaby
09-20-2010, 11:51 PM
OMG, I would love to go visit some places in the former Yugoslavia that were too dangerous (well the trains, roads to them were) while I was there. Some of the beaches, particularly, are recommended by so many people.

Next would be Africa, though. Or Greece :) I love me some Eastern Europe, but there are so many places I've never been! Like Canada, lol ;)

MissJones89
09-21-2010, 01:59 PM
Oh, Africa for sure! I have so many places I still need to see before I die - but I am the adventurous type, so hopefully it shouldn't be a problem ;)

Sounds like you've seen a lot of places already though :)

Where are you from?

backslashbaby
09-22-2010, 04:32 AM
I'm just from regular old NC :) But folks in my family were given what I saw as awesome opportunities to travel and/or work abroad through work, so I used every ounce of nepotism I could muster to tag along once I got old enough to prove useful in those places :D :D

And I traded in a big wedding by my folks for $$ for travel to study, lol. I have my priorities ;)

If it weren't so expensive to travel, I would have been around the globe twice by now :D

MissJones89
09-23-2010, 01:09 AM
NC as in North Carolina? That's so funny, I'm just considering going to North Carolina on exchange next year. You wouldn't happen to know anything about the campuses (e.g. Chapel Hill)?

Nepotism, good one! :D Sounds like you contributed to something. Where else did you go/work?

Travel instead of big wedding, good prioritization! Wish I had that option ;) So you've been to Eastern Europe but not Canada?

backslashbaby
09-23-2010, 02:36 AM
Ah! Chapel Hill absolutely rocks :D Look up Duke, too... very close by and my favorite of the two.

I did a shorter stint in San Jose, Costa Rica, because my Aunt and Uncle lived there :) My undergrad school had a term set aside for internships, so I interned at Motorola de Centroamerica. I do speak Spanish (not fluently/really bad fluent, lol).

I totally wish I could've taken Hungarian while in Hungary, but there was so much going on at the plant that there was no time :( I did learn a ton about Hungarian workers -- so great at science and math and those sorts of problems. They invented the Rubik's Cube :D Mostly, I hung out with folks ;)

Yeah, no Canada! It costs the same to fly there on frequent flier points, lol. I did do Tech Support for the French Canadians at my old job :) So I 'met' a bunch of them :D

But as far as 'hanging out' goes, I adore the Hungarian people, and their magical places :) Even if I have to speak in English or German instead of their beautiful language.

Oh, the big music my Hungarian friends gave me/had at parties at the time? John Cougar Mellencamp and Sade! I can't hear either one of them now without thinking of home-brew red wine and wild boar roasted over a slow fire :D Good times!

MissJones89
09-24-2010, 01:32 PM
I will definitely look up Duke, but it depends whether or not my university has an exchange agreement with the campus. Thanks!

You've been really lucky living at so many different places in the world :D How was South America?

Hungarian workers sound like fun! What do Hungarians do when they 'hang out'?
Do they generally home-brew or was it just a singular case? :P

backslashbaby
09-25-2010, 01:01 AM
OMG, Costa Ricans are awesome. Really, really lovely people and of course a gorgeous country :)

In Baja, we were great friends with a family that ran the pension where my dad lived for about a year when he first moved to Hungary. I love that they were like a second family, so quickly! We with our Southern roots really enjoy huge family get-togethers, and we were welcomed right in with this extended family :D

Istvan (who has since died :( but I still have a big ole cuddly dog named after him) was known for hunting wild boar, and roasting it well enough to challenge our Southern BBQ or Memphis ribs :D He was also known for his wine.

The folks from the plant were mainly younger, and they were much like Americans (in a good way, lol). Movies, music, hanging out dancing at parties. Trying to look cool :) All the same. Whether they were Serbs or Croatians, Hungarians or Transilvanians.

Strangers in Budapest are more reserved, kind of like New York without the propensity to tell you off :) Like Dubliners, I thought, or Parisians. Just more mind-our-own-business kind of folks than here in the South. But if you need something, they are right there and lovely to you. Just awesome :)

MissJones89
09-30-2010, 12:53 PM
Sounds like you didn't experience much culture shock in Hungary? With the young Hungarians acting somewhat like Americans, and the big family gatherings.

BBQ *drools* Wait, you lost me there for a moment! ;)

I'm still amazed at how much you've traveled.

SaraP
12-02-2010, 02:17 PM
Wink wink (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5560889&postcount=103). :D

backslashbaby
12-03-2010, 11:24 AM
Hallo Hungarians, sziasztok Kanadából :)

Szia!! I take it that's 'from a Canadian,' but Hungarian word endings are not my forte ;) :)

backslashbaby
12-04-2010, 03:56 AM
Oh! Those are so good to know :) I miss my Hungarian pals -- it's been several years now. I'd love to try a couple of those on some of them and have them wonder how I knew it!!

And I do love Hungarians so much. People in Budapest always thought I was Hungarian until I opened my mouth :) That's a compliment for me! The women are so pretty, too, lol ;)

My big dog Istvan says hello, btw :) Zolte the dog and Galushka (sp!) the kitty are in the better place, but aren't their names so great :D ?! The real names are after real, dear people, and I like to call kitties 'dumplings' because I'm Southern and we do that, lol!

Tepelus
12-17-2010, 01:28 AM
I had a German shepherd dog named Sarvar, but we had to put him to sleep because he lost the use of his back legs and was in pain. He was a good dog.

latourdumoine
01-06-2011, 07:27 AM
na jó, félig magyar vagyok apai ágon s Pesten éltem 5 évig, szóval valamennyire még megy a magyar. I do miss the place and am plotting my return as soon as possible and this is from someone living in Finland ;). Having said that, I still somehow manage to get my Hungarian fix here (though there are three Hungarians I'm dying to meet and talk to). I do miss those times in Hungary though. They also happened to be during my college years so double the fun. But if anyone has questions, feel free to ask. I'm sure there are people more qualified than I am but I'm willing to lend a hand where and if I can (and that just really sounded Hungarian as well).

Susan Anwin
07-21-2012, 12:39 AM
Hey, I'm from Budapest, currently living in Reykjavík Iceland writing in English. any other Hungarians?

Tepelus
07-21-2012, 04:17 AM
There were a couple floating around at one time, but I haven't seen them for a while. I'm not Hungarian, but I have a very keen interest in your country. Welcome to AW!

Radzeer
07-21-2012, 05:33 PM
One additional Hungarian reporting (from the US).

Tepelus
07-22-2012, 01:02 AM
That explains my question in your welcome post in the newbie room. :D

backslashbaby
07-22-2012, 03:27 PM
I lived in Baja and Budapest (weekends) in the 90's :) I love Hungary and Hungarians so much. Jo napot!

Is Icelandic really like Hungarian? That was the closest language, wasn't it? I am afraid I couldn't ever grasp Hungarian very much. I used a lot of German instead, lol ;)

Tepelus
07-23-2012, 12:36 AM
It is one of the hardest languages to learn, so I've heard.

Radzeer
07-23-2012, 01:45 AM
It is indeed hard because it does not resemble anything. I don't think I would have learned it had I not been born there. :)

Tepelus
07-23-2012, 02:34 AM
It does give you the upper hand. :tongue

I tried to learn it, albeit not very hard. I just wanted to learn a few basic greetings and words. Nothing sunk in. I found Romanian a little easier, but even that was difficult. I don't think my mind is wired to grasp another language. Even when I was living with my ex husband who was Romanian and spoke it quite frequently with his friends, I still couldn't get it. Some phrases and words, but no way could I carry on a conversation. Maybe if I was to live there and was forced to learn because I was living with people who didn't speak a word of English I might be able to learn, but that won't be happening.

SaraP
07-23-2012, 10:50 PM
Thread merge complete. Welcome to the Hungarian Thread.

Ok, guys, that was a wild ride. Anyone fall off their seat? :D

Oh, and welcome to the new folks! :hi:

Tepelus
07-23-2012, 11:43 PM
Ah, there's the other Hungarian thread.

SaraP
07-24-2012, 12:10 AM
It was hidden under the couch pillows. Right next to the remote I lost two years ago. And two very stale crackers. :D

Radzeer
07-24-2012, 08:12 AM
Ah, I almost thought that suddenly dozens of Hungarians registered... That would have been weird.

Anyway, to say something on topic, if you write anything in Hungarian it is about 15% longer than the same text in English. I'm sure everybody was dying to learn this. :)

Tepelus
07-28-2012, 04:26 AM
That's interesting. Is it because your words are longer, or is it because you guys have about twenty different words that describe one thing? Poking you in jest, but not really cuz it's true!

Radzeer
07-29-2012, 09:15 PM
It's not about the word length I think, more about the inflection we use to express complex grammar (not sure this is the right way to say it though, I am no linguist...). I don't think our vocabulary is much bigger than that of English.
It's a good question I don't really know the answer to. :)

Susan Anwin
08-17-2012, 06:43 PM
There were a couple floating around at one time, but I haven't seen them for a while. I'm not Hungarian, but I have a very keen interest in your country. Welcome to AW!


thank you so much :)

Susan Anwin
08-17-2012, 06:46 PM
I lived in Baja and Budapest (weekends) in the 90's :) I love Hungary and Hungarians so much. Jo napot!

Is Icelandic really like Hungarian? That was the closest language, wasn't it? I am afraid I couldn't ever grasp Hungarian very much. I used a lot of German instead, lol ;)

hello and thanks for the welcome. no, Icelandic is a germanic language, Hungarian is finno-ugrian, the only relative in Europe is Finnish

backslashbaby
08-18-2012, 01:25 AM
Finnish! That's the one :) They both sound fascinating and beautiful, and I can't pronounce either one! Nor Hungarian, unfortunately. The vowels can get me in many languages ;)

You'd think a small word like Baja would be easy to get folks to understand on the first go. Not in Hungarian for this Southern-US girl!

Radzeer
08-20-2012, 03:53 AM
Finnish is tricky though. I remember once they showed the Kalevala on Hungarian TV in original Finnish with HU subtitles, and I could not understand a word. That relation is "hardcore linguistic" and does not extend to understanding each other on the street. :)
BTW, Baja is a nice place. ;)

backslashbaby
08-20-2012, 01:15 PM
Oh, I didn't know whether you'd understand Finnish any or not :)

Baja is wonderful! Hot (like home), but wonderful :) And Budapest on the weekends at the company apartment! That was a great mixture :)

Gwyvian
07-27-2013, 04:40 PM
Kipp-kopp - gondoltam beköszönök magyarul is... :)

Btw, is there a rule for translating what I say here, given that this is an international thread?

SaraP
07-27-2013, 10:41 PM
You don't have to translate what you write, assuming you're writing in the language that the thread is for. However, if you write in French on this thread, translating might be a good idea. :D

The idea for the language threads was precisely to give members a chance to interact in other languages besides English (and let some people - like me - marvel at the beauty of the written word from other countries). :)

Gwyvian
07-27-2013, 11:37 PM
Great! :D

Now all that's needed is a few online Hungarians other than myself... :D

Radzeer
08-28-2013, 04:06 PM
Nem sokan vagyunk, az igaz, de lelkesek! :)

J.S.F.
04-02-2015, 01:57 PM
I have a question that hopefully someone can answer. In my third Catnip novel, some of the action takes place in Hungary. One of the characters is called a hunter, and my Google-fu turned up the word vadasz. Is that correct?

The other word is foradalom, which I took to mean revolution. I would greatly appreciate anyone setting me straight on these terms, if they are correct or not. If I'm in error, can someone please give me the correct words? Thanks in advance.

Aniko
04-19-2015, 05:41 PM
I have a question that hopefully someone can answer. In my third Catnip novel, some of the action takes place in Hungary. One of the characters is called a hunter, and my Google-fu turned up the word vadasz. Is that correct?

The other word is foradalom, which I took to mean revolution. I would greatly appreciate anyone setting me straight on these terms, if they are correct or not. If I'm in error, can someone please give me the correct words? Thanks in advance.

Hi there!

vadász is the word for hunter indeed! And the word for revolution is forradalom with a double r. let me know if you need help with anything else! :)

Aniko
04-19-2015, 05:42 PM
van még valaki aktív még a fórumon? :)

J.S.F.
04-21-2015, 07:09 AM
van még valaki aktív még a fórumon? :)
---

Unfortunately, I'm not very active in this part of the forum, as I'm not Hungarian in descent. (I'm Canadian, of Russian descent, and no, I don't speak Russian except for knowing a few greetings and swear words. :D)

However, I do greatly appreciate your help in this matter. I just wanted to get the right words for revolution and hunter in Hungarian, and I am grateful for your response. :)

Susan Anwin
07-23-2015, 04:07 PM
Kíváncsi vagyok, hogy mennyi kedves honfitárs képviselteti magát az AW-n. Remélhetőleg nem vagyok egyedül, de majd kiderül.

További szép jó estét. :)

yaaay, magyarok!!!

Susan Anwin
07-23-2015, 04:08 PM
én, többé kevésbe, meg lenne is pár kérdésem a többiekhez, ha van még magyar aki olvassa a fórumot

Susan Anwin
07-23-2015, 04:13 PM
magyarok; milyen nyelven írtok?

cantharis
08-25-2015, 06:56 AM
Szerv busztok, gondoltam legelső kommentemet ide írom.

Susan, én angolul, mivel egyrészt jobban élvezem, másrészt pedig a regényem politikai töltete ötven év múlva is olyan fringe lesz magyarországon, hogy nem lesz rá kereslet.

Susan Anwin
03-02-2017, 09:15 PM
hahó kicsit későn válaszolok de hátha még itt vagy

Susan Anwin
03-02-2017, 09:16 PM
Szerv busztok, gondoltam legelső kommentemet ide írom.

Susan, én angolul, mivel egyrészt jobban élvezem, másrészt pedig a regényem politikai töltete ötven év múlva is olyan fringe lesz magyarországon, hogy nem lesz rá kereslet.

szia, jaja én is angolul, sokkal gátlástalanabb vagyok angolul. miről irsz?

Albdantesque
03-05-2017, 05:43 PM
Hello fellow writers,

I was thinking to apply in a PHD program in Budapest, but I have no idea how is life for foreigners there. If I speak only English (cause I am almost deaf and --most probably-- Hungarian will not be my fifth language) will people answer my inquiries? I want to live no more than three years there and I am wondering what would be the cost of living for me and mom. Is 10k euros a year enough for two people living in Budapest?

I'd appreciate any info or advice...

TheHodorOne
01-09-2019, 10:13 AM
Üdv mindenkinek.
Nem sok mozgás van magyar fronton, úgy tűnik. Ettől függetlenül, gondoltam be köszönök ide is. Hadd lám egyedül vagyok? :hi: