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Fenika
07-06-2010, 06:42 PM
Hello to all the Poles and other Slavic folks out there. I see the Russian language already got a shout out.

So, where ya from, where do you live, and what do you speak, et al?

I'm Polish by blood, born and raised in the USA, always spoke a bit of Polish growing up, and am now working on improving my speaking and reading skills. I hope to read the first 5 books in The Witcher series by Andrej Sapkowski, in Polish, by the end of the year. It will be slow going, but that's okay :) I've read The Last Wish and Blood of Elves in English already, and will read those in Polish first, since I know what's going on. Then I can work on the rest.

Anyone know a good e-dictionary for Polish-English? :D

Namatu
07-06-2010, 11:41 PM
Dzien dobry, Fenika!

I want to speak Polish, but haven't managed to do it yet.

Freelancer
07-07-2010, 06:35 AM
Polak, Węgier — dwa bratanki,
i do szabli, i do szklanki,
oba zuchy, oba żwawi,
niech im Pan Bóg błogosławi.

Dzien dobry from Hungary, "cousin". :)

Fenika
07-09-2010, 10:33 AM
Dzien dobry, Fenika!

I want to speak Polish, but haven't managed to do it yet.

You should learn. It's a fun and challenging language.


Polak, Węgier — dwa bratanki,
i do szabli, i do szklanki,
oba zuchy, oba żwawi,
niech im Pan Bóg błogosławi.

Dzien dobry from Hungary, "cousin". :)

:) I read some of that, my Babcia translated some of it, and I like. Dzien dobry from the Czech Republic and soon to be in Krakow. :)

kuwisdelu
07-09-2010, 11:19 AM
Brawo dla Polaków! Moja dziewczyna jest kanadyjski, ale jej rodzina pochodzi z Mielca. Kobiety polskie są tak atrakcyjne.

And she typed that, not me, but I agree. :D

Try this dictionary (http://www.dict.pl/dict_iso).

Fenika
07-26-2010, 02:41 AM
:)

Some more dictionaries, some of which will find the root word from what you enter:
http://polish.slavic.pitt.edu/%7Eswan/beta/ (one of my favs atm)
http://www.ling.pl/index.html (also a fav atm)
http://www.wordreference.com/plen
http://www.ectaco.co.uk/English-Polish-Dictionary/

I'm currently looking for a good e-dictionary that doesn't cost more than a hardback one. The ectaco toys are tempting though.

Fenika
05-04-2011, 09:45 PM
Happy belated Constitution Day.

I have been working on my Polish via Rosetta Stone, listening online, reading The Witcher books po polsku, emailing my family po polsku, etc etc etc. It's coming along, but the grammar is still killing me ;)

There's a lovely free online course: http://polish.slavic.pitt.edu/
I can't get the sounds or extras to play on that- I keep meaning to email them about a CD or something for purchase.

SaraP
05-08-2011, 04:19 AM
Happy belated Constitution Day. :)

Fenika
05-08-2011, 04:43 AM
Dziękujemy za życzenia!

ETA: 'We thank you for the wishes' :)

goldmund
10-14-2011, 11:23 PM
Ah, it's time to revive this thread.
35, male, married, 1 son, living in Warsaw :-)
Miło was poznać.

If you read in Polish, I invite you to my homepage, there is a half-dead blog and excerpts from my novels.
HERE (http://blazejdzikowski.wordpress.com/)

Zelenka
10-14-2011, 11:57 PM
I'm just going to jump in randomly, shout dobrę den and then jump out again. Not Polish, but living in the Czech Republic, but then the OP did say 'Slavic' as well. I am planning on learning Polish but I have to master Czech first. So just saying ahoj.

Fenika
10-15-2011, 12:59 AM
Hello goldmund. I was just visiting Warsaw last month. I read Polish, but it's often a struggle. I'll see how I do with your blog :)

Ahoj, Zelenka! Nice to see you again. How are you getting settled in Czech? Prague treating you well?

Zelenka
10-15-2011, 01:08 AM
Hello goldmund. I was just visiting Warsaw last month. I read Polish, but it's often a struggle. I'll see how I do with your blog :)

Ahoj, Zelenka! Nice to see you again. How are you getting settled in Czech? Prague treating you well?

Settled in nicely, starting a new job next week (in training right now), trying out my language skills (or lack of same). ;)

Fenika
10-15-2011, 01:38 AM
It's not like the grammar is horribly complicated or anything ;)

My Czech is terrible (I know less than a dozen words, unless they are very similar to Polish :D), but with Polish at least, I've found it all looks and sounds so similar sometimes. But I can use that similarity when learning new words to kinda 'focus in' on the root sounds, even if they aren't based on the same root word stem. It helps, at least until someone starts talking really fast.

goldmund
10-15-2011, 01:45 AM
Don't trust similarities between Polish and Czech! If you ask for a fresh bread in Czech language, you'll get a week-old bun in Poland! ;-)

See, Fenika, it's a shame I posted so late -- we could meet in my proud capital.
My blog's not very interesting, just PR stuff. Check out my writing excerpts on the right of the main page (Straznik Parku, Wabienie Rekinow, Wszystkie zwierzeta...)

Zelenka
10-15-2011, 01:51 AM
It's not like the grammar is horribly complicated or anything ;)

My Czech is terrible (I know less than a dozen words, unless they are very similar to Polish :D), but with Polish at least, I've found it all looks and sounds so similar sometimes. But I can use that similarity when learning new words to kinda 'focus in' on the root sounds, even if they aren't based on the same root word stem. It helps, at least until someone starts talking really fast.

I'm at a pretty basic level, can ask for stuff and vaguely understand what people are saying, if they speak slowly enough. I need to actually work on it more though, I've been very lazy in studying for the last while.

Fenika
10-15-2011, 01:52 AM
Yeah, I never attempt to speak in Czech (except the odd single word). I just speak Polish and hope they understand enough. Sometimes they speak Czech and hope I understand enough. We might go back and forth a few times before hitting an impass. ;)

Zelenka
10-15-2011, 02:04 AM
Yeah, I never attempt to speak in Czech (except the odd single word). I just speak Polish and hope they understand enough. Sometimes they speak Czech and hope I understand enough. We might go back and forth a few times before hitting an impass. ;)

I feel slightly lucky that I have an east coast Scottish accent because it's helped an awful lot with pronunciation and some of the trickier letters, but annoying I'm still at the stage where I go to speak and go totally blank, yet five minutes later I know exactly how to say it.

I only did a tiny bit of Polish ages ago through an audio course, but I noticed I could read some of the labels in the Polish grocery in Glasgow after I started learning Czech. I'm going tomorrow though to get a book I saw on Czech verbs, try to get some vocab. I think my grammar is not so bad these days but I really need to extend my wordlists.

Richard White
10-22-2011, 11:15 PM
Dobry den!

Not a native slavic speaker, but I did study Czech and Slovak back in 1984-85 at the Defense Language Institute in Monterey. (Oh, please, I "HAVE" to go to Monterey, CA? Really? OK. *grin*)

Nowhere near as fluent as I was years ago, but I can still stumble through basic conversation and I (almost) remember how to conjugate verbs in all seven cases (nominative, accusative, dative, genitive, subjunctive, objective and imperative. - I think that's them anyway. *sigh*)

Still have my class books and cassette tapes from DLI somewhere around here. Probably ought to go dig them out one of these days and see how much I've forgotten.

Fenika
10-23-2011, 02:52 AM
I can read Czech labels sometimes, which is useful since my grandmother lives in Czech.

Welcome Richard. I bet your grammar is better than mine. I screw it up constantly ;)

fourlittlebees
11-28-2011, 06:16 PM
Aha! I knew I'd stumble my way here eventually! Dobry den!

My latest WIP (just finished as NaNo and now up for revisions) is loosely based on some obscure Polish mythology, and about half of it takes place in Puszcza Niepołomicka, about 25km outside of Kraków. My good Polish grammar is 20 years rusty. My bad Polish/English grammar learned at the feet of my family is rampant. :) Am hoping for some help in double-checking the few full sentences I use in flashback and/or dream sequences. I keep the Polish to a minimum, because while it's a beautiful language, I know Americans aren't fond of the footnotes, even in lit fic. I am, however, going to make them hopefully suck it up on the names of the Polish characters.

Dziękuję bardzo, in advance.

Fenika
11-28-2011, 10:29 PM
Welcome, Bees. What Polish Mythology did you use?

fourlittlebees
11-28-2011, 10:45 PM
Welcome, Bees. What Polish Mythology did you use?

The Dziwozony. I put it in a blender with a dash of the Lady of the Lake from Camelot mythos and a splash of Bene Gesserit from Dune. ;)

goldmund
11-29-2011, 04:15 AM
Ah, the forest creatures switch your babies for their own? I've used them, too, in my first novel :-) They're an attractive bunch.

Please feel free to send me the Polish sentences, I'll correct them for you, if needed.

fourlittlebees
11-29-2011, 05:14 AM
Yes, and no. I ignored the changeling idea, since it's only in some of the stories. I went with the idea that they killed male babies (selective breeding or killing male children) but what if one didn't follow along and raised that lone male child? And kept him hidden among humans until he reached maturity?

crazynance
12-10-2011, 12:19 AM
dzien dobry! I am a graduate of the one month summer immersion program in Wroclaw, and have a C+ in kindergarten Polish. WHAT did you say about not complicated? Except for ... dokenany, nie dokenany, and declining nouns, it's a piece of cake! Every Pole wants a piece of cake :D
Milo mi cie poznac! Have been looking for ways to practise Polish.

Fenika
12-11-2011, 06:20 AM
Hello! How was Wroclaw? What did you like about it? Congrats on finishing the immersion program.:)

Pacze Moj
12-12-2011, 09:48 PM
Cześć / Hello,

Witam z Kanady, gdzie jednak jest trochę Polaków, ale też miło, że i na takich forach się znajdujemy.

:)

It's also neat to see that non-Poles are interested in Polish and Slavic mythology. You probably know more about it than I do (*ahem*). But I do love old Polish cinema and I've read a sampling of Polish literature. I've even done a bit of translating: Tuwim, Brzechwa.

Cheers!


PS: To the original question -- the Polish-English (and English-Polish) online dictionaries I use most often are:

http://megaslownik.pl/slownik/polsko_angielski/
http://en.bab.la/dictionary/polish-english/

Fenika
12-12-2011, 10:15 PM
Witam z Pennsylvanie.

What Polish lit do you like? I've read some Sapkowski and started Desert and Wilderness in Polish but never finished. I started reading The Trilogy in English but the style eventually frustrated me unfortunately.

I could use something basic and fun. Maybe some Polish YA..

Pacze Moj
12-12-2011, 11:01 PM
I never got through much Sienkiewicz in Polish. I had W pustyni i w puszczy read to me when I was a kid (but without the violence) and picked up Ogniem i mieczem a few times, but just as often put it back down.

Something contemporary I enjoyed was Jerzy Pilch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerzy_Pilch)'s Spis cudzołożnic. Proza podróżna.

If you like science fiction, there's Adam Wiśniewski-Snerg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_Wi%C5%9Bniewski-Snerg). Less well-known than Lem or Zajdel, but good. And someone recently pointed me toward Jacek Dukaj (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacek_Dukaj)'s Lód but I can't vouch because I haven't read. It's a brick and comes out in English translation next year.

YA fiction: I don't know about nowadays, but if you don't mind older books, there's Alfred Szklarski (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Szklarski)'s series of "Tomek" novels. Basic boy's adventures, but they were popular. Zbigniew Nienacki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zbigniew_Nienacki)'s another one. He wrote a bunch of mysteries about a character called "Pan Samochodzik." The more-propagandistic passages might leave you rolling your eyes, though. If humor's more your thing and you like stories set in schools, try Edmund Niziurski (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Niziurski).

Władysław Reymont (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W%C5%82adys%C5%82aw_Reymont)'s Bunt sounds interesting and I've wanted to get my hands on a copy for a long time. It was published in 1922, is an allegory of the Bolshevik Revolution, and is about animals taking over a farm. Take that, Orwell!

goldmund
12-12-2011, 11:28 PM
Come on, Stanislaw Lem!!!1111!! For kids, YA, adults... he's a genius. And Witold Gombrowicz, too.

Pacze Moj
12-12-2011, 11:38 PM
Gombrowicz for kids? Jesus. Give 'em Bruno Schulz, too, and they may grow up to be time-traveling birds.

fourlittlebees
12-12-2011, 11:41 PM
I bet my Polish grammar hasn't been good enough to read even YA for years. I blame later taking Spanish with my Polish professor. You haven't lived until you arrive at office hours and greet her with: Buenas tardes, Pani Professora. ;)

Children's I could do, probably up to chapter books. :)

Fenika
12-12-2011, 11:46 PM
Thanks for the suggestions :) Dziękuję.

crazynance
12-13-2011, 01:39 AM
!Hola! Whoops, wrong thread... lol
Dziekujemy, Fenika. I thoroughly enjoyed my time in Poland until all 3 kids got Chicken Pox (Ospa!) I occasionally throw phrases at my Polish bank lady, and have now found a native Pole here in my town, who is also in a club with me. :D I practised 'milo cie widziec' for a week before I saw her. I can tell this will be fun.

Fenika
12-13-2011, 01:41 AM
This is kinda exciting to have so many Poles and Slavs posting (I can say Slavs, right?!?! Or should I just stick with Slavic folk?)

crazynance
12-13-2011, 01:44 AM
technical point: Poles are Slavs, yes? (too picky for my own good)

Fenika
12-13-2011, 01:51 AM
Well yes, but I thought I'd single the Poles out cuz I'm biased ;)

Even if most of my family in Europe actually lives in Czech since they shifted the border to the Olza River...

goldmund
12-13-2011, 01:24 PM
Truth be told, it has a ring not entirely positive. A bit like if you kept calling Germans and Swedes "Aryans"... I believe not many people in Eastern Europe think of themselves as Slavs these days -- apart from neopagans and people preoccupied with racial theories.

Pacze Moj - we take Ferdydurke in High School... but I agree WG is a feast for a more developed palate.

BillWobbleSword
06-13-2012, 08:02 PM
Polish thread? There's a Polish thread? Ale jaja, I should come to this site more often. I'm a Canadian who lived in Poland after the Commies got turfed. My new crime novel is set in Polska at that time. Maybe I could've used some of you for verification of things Polish. Oh well, maybe next time.

Czesc, by the way.

www.stevenowad.com (http://www.stevenowad.com)

Xelebes
06-13-2012, 08:28 PM
Truth be told, it has a ring not entirely positive. A bit like if you kept calling Germans and Swedes "Aryans"... I believe not many people in Eastern Europe think of themselves as Slavs these days -- apart from neopagans and people preoccupied with racial theories.

Pacze Moj - we take Ferdydurke in High School... but I agree WG is a feast for a more developed palate.

Actually, I would think it was more like Norse than Aryan. Aryan refers more to the Iranians than it does Germans.

Fenika
06-14-2012, 12:24 AM
Welcome, Bill :)

aruna
10-01-2012, 09:49 PM
Thought I'd jump into this forum with a bit of news:

The Polish edition of Of Marriageable Age came out on 26th September 2012. This is the quickest I've ever had a book go from initial publisher's offer (December 2011) to publication -- and it includes translation into Polish -- at 700 pages, quite a lot of translation too! It seems they are promoting it widely as well, according to google.

Anyway, I got six free copies. I am giving three away to people I know, keeping one for myself -- and have one on offer to any AW who wants it, first come first served! Maybe a donation toward postage, and the book is free. I live in Germany, btw.

If you're interested, send me a pm.

Here's a link to it on Germany's Amazon (http://www.amazon.de/Hinduskie-zaslubiny-Sharon-Maas/dp/8378392945), where is says it was published on January 12th, which is blatantly wrong! I didn't even have the contract on that date!

aruna
10-02-2012, 10:22 PM
Just to say: the book has gone!

aruna
12-25-2012, 03:43 PM
Merry Christmas to all Polish speakers!

I just googled the name of my book in Polish and it seems it is all over the Polish web... hope that translates to good sales! Google translations seens to indicate that it's getting good reviews.

Anyway, there's also a YouTube of someone speaking (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkbXntQhQN0) about it, apparently on Polish TV. I wonder if someone could have a look and give me the gist of what she is saying?
Thanks!

fourlittlebees
10-02-2013, 03:09 AM
Anyone in this thread still around? Could use some grammar help with a sentence.

Dziękuje bardzo!

Fenika
10-02-2013, 03:18 AM
Oops, I lost the subscription to this thread. Aruna- That's awesome! Do you still need the video translated?

Bees- my Polish grammar is dire, so I'm no help. There is a big translation forum that has entire Slavic subforums... I havent been in years though.

Fenika
10-02-2013, 03:29 AM
Wow, she talls fastttt. She starts with generals, then gets into premise right before the 1min mark. She talks about how the book is divided up and I think she had good things to say about dialogue and action bt she was going too fast.

Skipping ahead to minute seven, she's countig points about the book... And um, does your story have a discussion of pooping habits between cultures, cuz that's what I understood, lol. Seems to be a minor point, but she said herself everyone does it.

And then she wraps up and seemed positive and I think she ended with a contest or somesuch.

I might have to slow her down to be any more use than that, lol.

aruna
04-14-2014, 07:11 PM
Just back from Poznan!
I was invited as the guest speaker at a conference called Literature in English Symposium (LIES) (http://wa.amu.edu.pl/lies/) at the University. I had a wonderful time: they were suck kind hospitable hosts and they seem to have a "thing" for Guyanese authors -- I am the third in ten years! I did not learn much Polish, though. I took to counting the consonants in Polish words to see if I could find the record -- the longest word I found had eight consonants together, only two vowels, both at the end! Don't ask me what the word was, though.
Did some sightseeing in Poznan and will post some photos later, maybe.

Xelebes
04-14-2014, 09:02 PM
I was invited as the guest speaker at a conference called Literature in English Symposium (LIES) (http://wa.amu.edu.pl/lies/)

. . . what?

aruna
04-14-2014, 11:07 PM
all LIES! :)
It's a yearly meeting and I'm the third Guyanese guest speaker... they seem to have a special place in their hearts for Guyana and its authors.

Creative Cowboy
11-13-2015, 03:21 AM
I am working on a story and I need a name for colour, a passing character but a notable one, same as if you were writing about America in 1860 and your protagonist mentioned the American President. You would need to know the name is Lincoln. I need to know who the head, or who the most likely candidate to head, the Pruszkow mafia would be in 2003?

I know there was a power vacuum with the assassination of "Pershing." And I know many rats fled only to be later brought back to justice in Poland. But the Pruszkow mafia continued during this time. Someone or a coalition of persons must have kept the heart beating. I need to know, with documented source in Polish is fine, whom would be the likely candidate for that? I need a name, like Lincoln, as I am writing a crime story involving this group.

I hope someone in this topic can help me out. This is a minor detail but it is an important one.

Is there anyone still here? Would anyone please kindly help? I am on deadline for this story - spring 2016. I would appreciate your help, please?

Tocotin
11-14-2015, 03:32 PM
Hello there.

I did some web browsing, and apparently after the assassination of Pershing, the Pruszków mafia was ruled by a coalition of six:

Janusz Parasol "Parasol" ("Parasol" or "Umbrella")
Zygmunt Rażniak "Bolo"
Andrzej Banasiak "Słowik" ("Nightingale")
Ryszard Szwarc "Kajtek"
Mirosław Danielak "Malizna" ("Tiny")
Leszek Danielak "Wańka" ("Ivan")

I'm not an expert or anything, but I guess you can easily use one of the above names, they would be familiar for the criminal world.

Hope this helps.

Creative Cowboy
11-14-2015, 05:01 PM
Thank you very much for this! I have one of these names I am sure of, Miroslaw Danielak (https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miros%C5%82aw_Danielak) but some of them were on the run outside of Poland.

Can you tell me, please, which ones were still in Poland, able to be "hands on." Do you have any web pages you can share, giving this information? I would appreciate the source.

Tocotin
11-14-2015, 06:55 PM
Hello, this is the source I used: http://mafiapruszkowska.bloog.pl/?smoybbtticaid=615f10

I have no idea how accurate or trustworthy it is, though. It doesn't say anything about their place of residence.