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Kateness
07-05-2010, 11:59 PM
Я говорю русскй язык очень плохой, но Я его изучала в университет на 4 года.

Вы говорите по-русски?

(yeah, feel free to tell me how bad that was. I was the despair of my poor Russian professor. Poor Маша)

kuwisdelu
07-06-2010, 12:02 AM
Da.

Liosse de Velishaf
07-06-2010, 12:13 AM
4 years? I wish I had room in my schedule to study Russian at school. Was there a particular reason you took it up?

firedrake
07-06-2010, 12:15 AM
Da, I understood just about everything you wrote .
Not bad at all.

Mind, it's been nearly 30 years since I learned Russian so I'm quite pleased with myself for being able to read that. :D

Kateness
07-06-2010, 03:11 AM
Liosse, a) it seemed like a fun challenge, b) my first ever epic novel prominently featured Russian characters which led to significant fascination from about age 12 onwards.

(I also speak a little Arabic, also because it seemed like a fun challenge at the time. At the time.)

Liosse de Velishaf
07-06-2010, 03:18 AM
Liosse, a) it seemed like a fun challenge, b) my first ever epic novel prominently featured Russian characters which led to significant fascination from about age 12 onwards.

(I also speak a little Arabic, also because it seemed like a fun challenge at the time. At the time.)

It always seems fun at the time. Then you stop to think that the native speaker of whatever language spent the entire first six years of their life learning the dang language, knowing they could never communicate anything without it, whereas you get three or four hours a week for 4 years or so, and have almost nothing that requires you to use that language. It's why I had to give in and drop Chinese next semester, because I was already taking Italian and Japanese. (If there had been a Russian class that fit my schedule, I would have signed up for that, too; and it would then suffer Chinese's fate.)

Kateness
07-06-2010, 03:22 AM
It's just Russian's three genders, six grammatical cases and a grammar structure that requires every damn thing to be conjugated in every damn sentence, and verbs of motion that would make a genius weep.

On the other hand, I know three alphabets :D

Liosse de Velishaf
07-06-2010, 03:24 AM
It's just Russian's three genders, six grammatical cases and a grammar structure that requires every damn thing to be conjugated in every damn sentence, and verbs of motion that would make a genius weep.

On the other hand, I know three alphabets :D


Hehe... Alphabets are fun. :) But Russian's got nothing on Latin for paradigms.

Mr. Anonymous
07-09-2010, 08:42 AM
Ya govoryoo pa ruski toje. Ruski moy pervoy ezik, k cajilenyoo, mnogo po zobival, ee teper moy angliski no mnogo silneya.

Priene
07-09-2010, 07:17 PM
Вот Русская клавиатура (http://www.apronus.com/internet/ruskey.htm) - очень полезная идея.

xcomplex
07-10-2010, 06:36 AM
da ya razgavarevoyu lol. I have english keyboards so blah! That wasn't so bad Kateness. Would change some things here and there to make it more proper but good job! You said плохой but you would say плохa because if you say what you said you are talking about the language being bad not yourself speaking bad, lol. Sorry had to point that out. Have fun!

Kateness
07-10-2010, 07:34 PM
У меня есть английская клавиатура, но я превращала положение "Windows"

SaraP
07-10-2010, 07:51 PM
Windows! I know that word! :D

Priene
07-10-2010, 08:02 PM
The online translator at Paralink (http://webtranslation.paralink.com/) translates Window as виндов. Whatever happened to окно?

Kateness
07-10-2010, 08:07 PM
почему "окно" на доме и "виндов" на компыютере :D

xcomplex
07-12-2010, 05:10 AM
because okHo is a literal window. Computer language is different in russian. Lots of the computer technical words come from english.

Kalyke
07-12-2010, 06:54 AM
I took 4 semesters of Russian in college, I would like to know where I can get a Russian keyboard setup, and also I'd love to "try" to talk to anyone who wants to chat in very basic Russian.

Kateness
07-12-2010, 07:00 AM
Use Her Name...

These are Windows Vista instructions...

Go to Control Panel
Then Clock, Language, and Region
Then Regional and Language Options
go to the Keyboards and Languages tab
click "Change Keyboards"
Then, on the right-hand side of the window which will open, click "add
Find Russian, press on the + sign
Under keyboard, check the box next to "Russian" (not typewriter)
Then press OK.

After that, you should be taken back to the original window. In the bottom right, make sure to press "Apply"

Then, along your taskbar, there should be something which reads "EN". This is your language bar. You can click on it to change the language which your keyboard types in.

Annayna
07-23-2010, 08:07 AM
I love the Russian language ! <3

Oberon89
09-10-2010, 06:52 AM
Hoping for some help...

I have two transliterated Russian phrases that I need confirmed...

He is not that strong: On ne takoi sil'nya

He is not telling the truth: On ne gavarit pravdu

Do those look right? Thanks so much!

emmenthal
09-11-2010, 02:57 AM
Wow, I can still understand some Russian sixteen years after doing it at school! я люблю руский язык (can't spell in it very well though).

fringle
09-11-2010, 09:28 AM
I speak Russian, but not all that well (my kids correct my grammar). I'm American but I live in Moscow. I got so mad at the Russian language last year that I removed Russian from my computer. Partly out of spite, and partly so my husband couldn't have me Yandex stuff for him anymore.

Laura Lond
09-16-2010, 09:18 AM
Hoping for some help...

I have two transliterated Russian phrases that I need confirmed...

He is not that strong: On ne takoi sil'nya

He is not telling the truth: On ne gavarit pravdu

Do those look right? Thanks so much!

1. Very close, I would change the last word to "sil'ny". Он не такой сильный. You can also say "On ne tak silyon" - Он не так силён.

2. Correct. Он не говорит правду.

Oberon89
09-16-2010, 08:43 PM
Thank you for your help, Laura! :)

SaraP
12-02-2010, 01:46 PM
Nudge (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5560889&postcount=103). :D

Izhitsa
10-17-2011, 01:02 PM
Тихо тут... Доброе время суток всем!

goldmund
10-17-2011, 02:34 PM
I belong to the last generation of Poles, who had Russian as an obligatory language at primary school. It was considered a sign of an oppression, but I'm glad I can read Cyrillic and listen to Vysotskij.

And also...
Ya pomnyu chudnoye mgnavyenye...
Pyeredo mnoy yavilas ti...
Kak mimolotnye mgnavyenye...
Kak geniy tchistoy krasaty!

Izhitsa
10-17-2011, 11:34 PM
Pushkin's 'marvellous moment', it appears, is for all time!

Forcing someone to study Russian may well be regarded as an imposition; I believe mine is a hard language to study, even for a willing learner.

I hold Vysotsky in high esteem too.

Bukarella
11-06-2011, 04:31 PM
just saying a quick hello on this old thread.
Ya is Kharkova, esli kto znaet.

Izhitsa
11-06-2011, 08:36 PM
just saying a quick hello on this old thread.
Ya is Kharkova, esli kto znaet.
Привет из Москвы! В Харькове не бывал, правда.

Deizelcore
11-06-2011, 11:31 PM
Я из Латвии, отмечусь ради галочки. Вообще русско-говорящих здесь много, однако пишут (практически) все на английском => лучше найти другой форум найти если желание общаться с русскими авторами.

(в пунктуации могут быть серьезные ошибки, я по привычке ставлю их как в англ. языке)

Izhitsa
11-07-2011, 08:53 PM
Я из Латвии, отмечусь ради галочки. Вообще русско-говорящих здесь много, однако пишут (практически) все на английском => лучше найти другой форум найти если желание общаться с русскими авторами.
...
I should imagine so.

aruna
01-01-2012, 12:33 PM
Today I noticed a lot of traffic coming to my blog through a Russian site (http://new-year-day-2012.blogspot.com/search?q=Aruna+Sharan). It's a site about New Year's Day and mostly in English, but doing a search I found the link to my blog -- in Russian.
Can anyone translate?
Сообщения, соответствующие запросу Aruna Sharan, отсутствуют. Показать все сообщения (http://new-year-day-2012.blogspot.com/)

Also, I don't get it: that Russian link above refers back to the same site it's on; there seems to be no direct link to my blog. Yet my stats page says the source is that blog.

ETA: it seems a lot of bloggers are getting it, see the comments on this thread: http://new-year-day-2012.blogspot.com/2011/12/new-year-traditions.html?showComment=1325407075300#c2736264 975974278163

But all it's doing is driving traffic to me; nobody has actually spammed the blog. Weird/

Fresie
01-12-2012, 03:30 AM
Hi, aruna,

The Russian phrase is a technical message. It says, more or less,

The search term Aruna Sharan produced no results in messages. Show all messages.

It's a mystery to me too, but quite often I follow search results to a site just like you did only to find out that the keywords I entered are nowhere to be seen.

Filmfeline
01-12-2012, 05:05 AM
Тихо тут... Доброе время суток всем!


Bсем Привет!

AnneMayfair
02-01-2012, 03:48 PM
Всем привет из Москвы! Я рада, что нашла этот форум и хочу сразу сказать, что готова оказывать помощь авторам, не говорящим по-русски, с любыми проблемами, которые могут в связи с этим возникнуть.
Greetings from Moscow, everyone! I'm very glad that I've found this forum and I want to say that I'm ready to help non-Russian authors (or authors that simply don't speak Russian at all) with any kind of problems you might have.
Always ready for meeting fellow authors!

Auroch
02-05-2012, 09:03 AM
А я тоже изучил русски язык, и работал в Россию, Украйню, и Беларусь. Я Канадец, и там работал как преподаватель английского языка.

Давно что я писал что нибуд на русском языке. Хочу ещё раз начинаться учить.

SaraP
02-05-2012, 02:58 PM
A big welcome to the new AW'ers that are popping on here. :welcome:

Tex
02-07-2012, 03:20 PM
А я тоже изучил русски язык, и работал в Россию, Украйню, и Беларусь. Я Канадец, и там работал как преподаватель английского языка.

Давно что я писал что нибуд на русском языке. Хочу ещё раз начинаться учить.


А я тоже учил русский язык и работал в России, на Украине и в Белоруссии. Я канадец, и работал там преподавателем английского языка.

Давно я не писал чего-нибудь на русском языке (или по-русски). Хочу еще раз начать его учить.

Fresie
02-08-2012, 11:35 PM
Hi new guys, AnneMayfair, Auroch, Tex, filmfeline and all!

Great to meet you!

Fresie
02-08-2012, 11:38 PM
I should imagine so.

Deiselcore and Izhitsa, if indeed you're looking for a Russian-language writing forum, the best one is hosted by Russia's EKSMO publishing house. It's very serious and professional, discussing more or less the same issues, and you can find it here:

EKSMO Forum (http://forum.eksmo.ru/)

Bricta
05-17-2012, 07:52 AM
Привет! Я тоже говорю по-русский, но это не мой первый язык. Я занималась русским языком в университете за года 3 или 4. Поэтому, я делаю наверно много ошибок.

WritingIsHard
09-06-2012, 08:25 AM
I'm a native Russian speaker, so if anyone here needs help with Russian for their writing, feel free to ask. Always happy to feel like I'm smarter than other people ;)

Lidiya
09-23-2012, 03:15 PM
Privet!

I'm not Russian...in fact I don't know any Russian at all, but I'm Bulgarian and the languages are similar, so I understand a lot of it :D

memoriadeclarativa
11-12-2012, 05:32 AM
http://etimologias.dechile.net/?eslavo


Castilian (Spanish) is an indoeuropean language too. My father, who was Russian and mastered six languages, used to say laughing that Castilian was a deficient version of Russian, giving me the following examples:

http://i.imgur.com/XItSN.jpg

Russo-speakers, were you aware of this similitude?

quill10
01-23-2013, 08:50 AM
Hi All,

Could your help me with these questions?

1. Is Lomonosov Moscow State University now called Moscow State University?

2. At what age did children start to go to school in 1940s?

3. In 1950s, did most of the residents in Moscow live in houses or apartments?

Many thanks for your help!

JDwrites
01-26-2013, 04:24 AM
я тоже понимаю немножко русский язык
было не плохо

Fresie
02-15-2013, 05:29 PM
Hi All,

Could your help me with these questions?

1. Is Lomonosov Moscow State University now called Moscow State University?

2. At what age did children start to go to school in 1940s?

3. In 1950s, did most of the residents in Moscow live in houses or apartments?

Many thanks for your help!

Hi Quill10,

Sorry, I've been away from AWWC for a while :)

1. It's officially called Lomonosov Moscow State University. But anyone's free to drop Lomonosov's name in colloquial speech. Native speakers usually call it MGU, short for Moscow State University.

2. In 1940, children started school at 8 years old. In 1944, school age was changed to start at 7. Please note that from 1939 until 1956, high school, college and university education in the USSR were fee-based. It wasn't too expensive though: about 10% of an average family's income. But you still had to pay to continue your studies.

3. In 1950s, the overwhelming majority of Muscovites lived in apartments. It was normal practice in the USSR, and still is in Russia. In those days, an average "private house" was (and often still is these days if you don't count new Russians' posh villas) a very basic and dilapidated affair, usually a log cabin, often without any plumbing or proper heating (but it always had electricity and a radio outlet). Living in such a 'house" and not in a "proper" apartment that had central heating, hot water and indoor toilets, was considered a sign of utter misery and bad fortune :) As for proper stone private houses of well-off Russians, after the revolution of 1917 they were all changed into apartments to house dozens of families (a family per room,usually) and the old owners were either left one room to live in, or arrested and evicted. So most pre-1917 private houses were turned into apartments, too. When high-standing Soviet Russians wanted to have a private house, this was what an out-of-town "dacha" (a holiday house) was for. They could be true mansions with servants, all for one family. But most such dachas were state-owned and once their temporary owner retired or otherwise lost his post, the family lost their right to live there and the dacha was passed over to his successor.

But in cities, even the poshest Soviet Russians lived in apartments - often elaborate with a great many rooms and servants, but apartments nevertheless.

Hope it helps :)

Draconess25
03-26-2014, 08:32 PM
Hi! :P

I don't speak any Russian, but I'm 1/8 on my mom's side. I need help figuring the meaning of her maiden name: Grincavich. My Granny says it used to be spelled Grincovich, but I'm not sure if she's right or if one letter even makes a difference. I can't find any information using either spelling except for stuff about my family. It's been bugging me for awhile. Also, how would it be written in Cyrillic?

Thanks to anyone who can help! Dx

Quentin Nokov
03-26-2014, 09:39 PM
Could be spelled: Гринкевич -- in Cryllic. Though it's technically spelled Grinkevich. I'm not fluent in Russian, but am interested in the language. And can sort of understand the alphabet.

Fresie
03-26-2014, 11:46 PM
Hi! :P

I don't speak any Russian, but I'm 1/8 on my mom's side. I need help figuring the meaning of her maiden name: Grincavich. My Granny says it used to be spelled Grincovich, but I'm not sure if she's right or if one letter even makes a difference. I can't find any information using either spelling except for stuff about my family. It's been bugging me for awhile. Also, how would it be written in Cyrillic?

Thanks to anyone who can help! Dx

Actually, could be Grincovich as well - spelled Гринкович in Cyrillic. Quite a few of them on Russian Facebook. The name is quite common in Belarus and Western Ukraine and is originally a medieval Polish name - a Polish envoy to Belarus Grincovich is mentioned as early as 1432.

Draconess25
03-27-2014, 12:03 AM
Actually, could be Grincovich as well - spelled Гринкович in Cyrillic. Quite a few of them on Russian Facebook. The name is quite common in Belarus and Western Ukraine and is originally a medieval Polish name - a Polish envoy to Belarus Grincovich is mentioned as early as 1432.

Huh, I guess it's just my family's spelling that isn't too common....O.o No clue what it means, though?

Fresie
03-27-2014, 12:13 AM
Huh, I guess it's just my family's spelling that isn't too common....O.o No clue what it means, though?

Yeah, it's derived from the first name Grinko (green-KOH), a common West Slavic diminutive form of Gregory. Apparently, your Granny's family had an ancestor Gregory (Grigori) whom everybody called Grinko so his children became Grinkovich - that's possessive meaning "Grinko's children".

Draconess25
03-27-2014, 01:35 AM
Yeah, it's derived from the first name Grinko (green-KOH), a common West Slavic diminutive form of Gregory. Apparently, your Granny's family had an ancestor Gregory (Grigori) whom everybody called Grinko so his children became Grinkovich - that's possessive meaning "Grinko's children".

Aw cool! :D Thanks!

Fresie
03-28-2014, 02:49 AM
Aw cool! :D Thanks!

You're very welcome! :Hug2:

Moont
05-02-2014, 04:22 AM
Здравствуйте! Всем привет из барселона! Очень приятно! Как дела? Я не говорю по-русскию... because I taught myself Russian for about a month, then got health problems and stopped, and now I'm a bit better would like to keep learning, though I only know a few very basic sentences. I'm glad you offered to help, AnneMayFair and WritingIsHard, because I'd like to take you up on your offer. You see, I had this weird idea to write a piece of fic with a few of my characters who speak Russian among themselves (just a very few sentences) and a third character with a scant knowledge of the language misunderstands what those guys are saying and well... chaos erupts in this particular scene I've in mind. OK I'm no published author yet - am just beginning to seriously think of trying, been writing for my own pleasure for a long time, though.. and I tried Google translator but I think it may sound awful, really... One of my characters says 6 short sentences (The "greeting" and "how are you" parts,I can do myself, I think) and his subordinate responds with 5 short sentences.
If you are still willing to help, should I pm you with my attempt at translation for correction, or should I post it here with the English translation of my intended dialogue? The rest of the story is not in Russian. I've written it in English, Spanish and Catalan.


Thank you very much for your help!

Andreus
08-01-2014, 08:38 PM
If you need some support in Russian, you are welcome. )

CC.Allen
01-25-2015, 09:52 PM
Hello everyone,

I have used an online tool to translate the following sentence from English to Russian. I'm curious if anyone out there who may be bilingual, could confirm or deny the accuracy of the translation? I only used a free online tool, as this is the only Russian line in my book and I wanted to avoid an expense.

Thank you so much for anyone who could confirm this or correct me, if necessary!

English:

I love you, my beautiful Valentina.

Russian:

Я люблю тебя, мой прекрасный Валентину

Olga
01-26-2015, 01:15 AM
English:

I love you, my beautiful Valentina.

Russian:

Я люблю тебя, мой прекрасный Валентину

Assuming Valentina is a woman, it should be

Я люблю тебя, моя прекрасная Валентина

or

Я люблю Вас, моя прекрасная Валентина

depending on how formal you want it to sound.

CC.Allen
01-26-2015, 07:22 AM
Thank you so much Olga! I hadn't thought about gender quality, but wondered if there may be close translations for some reason or another.

Once I read your reply, it made me think of Spanish. I know very little, but do now that all objects are associated with a masculine or feminine quality & it just sounds wrong when you change an object's gender.

To add a little context to my sentence... It is a father speaking to his infant daughter in a moment where he is actually crying goodbye to her, knowing that he is about to die.
...
What kind of formality would you think he would use in that moment?

Thanks again, so very much, for your assistance!
~Casey

Olga
01-26-2015, 09:57 AM
If he is talking to his daughter, he would say
Я люблю тебя, моя прекрасная Валентина.

In these two aspects (formality and gender changes) Russian is similar to Spanish and French, except it has three genders (neutral is the third one).

morngnstar
01-26-2015, 10:00 AM
You probably also want to think about whether to use the formal name or one of the diminutives: Val'a, Valechka, or Valen'ka. I'm not a native Russian speaker so I shouldn't really advise. Often a family member would use a diminutive, but in a moment like this, maybe it really depends on your character and only you can decide what's right.

CC.Allen
01-26-2015, 10:52 AM
Super, Olga. I've done it just as so. Thanks again!

Yes, Morngnstar, I had played with that idea, way back during early drafts. The baby is actually a grown up character in my book and goes by Tina. I really wanted to make this flashback resonate with emotion and every name I tried never had the same effect as Valentina. Good thought, thanks for offering.

Olga
01-26-2015, 10:56 AM
Morngnstar, you are absolutely right that very often family members don't address each other by full name. I should have thought about it. In fact, now that I think of it, I don't remember ever being addressed as Olga :) But then, nobody ever addressed me as "my beautiful ... ". That alone suggests a certain level of "high" language that sounds better with the full name, at least to me. But yes, it depends on the character, situation, and even general time period.

SaraP
01-26-2015, 09:17 PM
Just a drive-by post to thank you guys for helping out. I love to see our International peeps posting helpful comments regarding their language. :)

Dannyher
01-29-2015, 12:17 PM
I have an opportunity to learn Russian, Ukrainian or Poland, not sure what to choose. I am not planning to visit any of these countries in the nearest future, anyway I have to choose one.

Fresie
02-02-2015, 06:25 PM
I have an opportunity to learn Russian, Ukrainian or Poland, not sure what to choose. I am not planning to visit any of these countries in the nearest future, anyway I have to choose one.

To me, all three sound fine. Being Russian, I'd suggest Russian, but I used to study Polish when I was a teenager and I loved it, it's such a pretty language. Ukrainian is also very melodious and rich in beautiful colloquialisms. All three have fabulous literature. Actually, Ukrainian is more or less halfway between Russian and Polish, so once you learn Russian or Polish, learning Ukrainian is like learning a new dialect rather than a new language. But to study Polish, you don't need to learn the Cyrillic alphabet because they use Latin letters. So I should start with Polish as the easiest, then - if you wish - move on to the other two.

JRHardesty
02-06-2015, 11:36 AM
I know some Russian, as I was a Russian linguist in the US Air Force back in the early '70s. The course was 9 months of intensive (40 hrs/wk) training. We learned to read, write & speak the language. When we graduated, our senior instructor congratulated us with a statement to the effect that we now had the language proficiency of a 7 year old native speaker but we got there in only 9 months! I'm rusty, but have been able to read the majority of what has been written here. That's comforting. My keyboard is not set up for Cyrillic, so I have to transliterate. Do svidaniya!

Quentin Nokov
02-06-2015, 10:30 PM
I found an entire Russian course online (3 semesters). The videos are hosted on Youtube. I have already printed off the first semester work-sheets.

http://www.dallasisd.org/Page/27245

allias
02-10-2015, 07:34 PM
A friend of mine managed to get intermediate level quite fast with the help of this resource russianlessons.net. Good luck! :)

Newdaddy06
03-29-2015, 05:33 PM
Hi,
I have a short SF story that uses fairly simple language, and I have a (pretty poor) grasp of Russian, and also family that speaks it natively. I'm trying to find, if they exist, Russian markets for SF short fiction. I'm thinking this would be a fun project for me, and my family, to do the translation ourselves.

Can anybody help me locate the markets there, if they exist? I'm, thinking along the lines of ANALOG or ASIMOV'S magazines here in the US.

I appreciate any help or suggestions. Thanks thanks thanks -

Newdaddy06

pisatel
06-06-2015, 07:43 PM
Reminds me of my trip to Russia. Вы можете написать немного медленнее, пожалуйста,
спасибо!

jasrow
06-19-2015, 01:26 AM
Привет всем! Меня зовут Жасмин :) Я живу в Нью-Йорке.

SamuelKristopher
01-17-2016, 08:09 PM
Hey are there any Russians from St. Petersburg here? I've been living in this city for a year and a half now and I love it, but I'm wondering if there's a book club somewhere around?

Br4dz
02-16-2016, 01:20 PM
Здравствуйте. Меня зовут Брэд. Я учусь говорить на Русском.
I probably know more about Russia than I know about my own country but I'm still learning the language. I know the history from the days of Rurik and Kievan Rus to the Great Patriotic War, the revolutions, and the civil war. I also know the holidays and myths, have talked to a lot of Russians living in Russia and Ukraine, know the Cyrillic and Old Church Slavonic alphabets, can type Russian on an English keyboard, and can write and read Russian script. I also read Russian newspapers (Российская газета, Комсомольская правда, и Красная Звезда), watch Russian movies, and my favorite band is Smyslovye Gallyutsinatsii (Смысловые галлюцинации) and my favorite Russian author is Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

The two heroes in the Sci-fi book I've started are a Russian and an American so I totally do need to learn more of the language and common phrases and I totally appreciate any help I can get with that.

morngnstar
02-18-2018, 03:59 AM
Привет. Can someone help me with an astronomical translation problem? What do Russians call the Big Dipper? Or Ursa Major. Whichever one you consider the more recognizable constellation. According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Dipper, most Slavic languages use something that means "The Great Wagon" (Кола, Колесница, Воз,Арба, Телега, Повозка, Колымага, according to http://www.icos2014.com/wp-content/uploads/icos2014_v5_104.pdf), but if you click on the corresponding page on Russian Wikipedia, the title is Большой Ковш, or Great Bucket.

Which of these is the most common for a modern speaker? My character is Russian and thinks in Russian, but the book is written in English, and her thoughts are translated so the English speaking reader can understand them naturally. But I like to keep a little Russian flavor by being aware of the differences, so it would be nice to get this right.

Fencer_24
04-10-2018, 10:45 PM
I asked the wife, your best bet would be Большой Ковш.

Привет всем! Я Оливье из Белгии, и сейчас живу в России, я поэтому говорю на русском. Я сначала учил этот язык в школе, потом долго забыл о нём, но я сейчас восстановыл свой уровень и могу использовать русский язык для работы без особенных проблем. Это мне полезно также и для разработки моей книги потому, что большинство истории происходит в СССР. У меня самая большая проблема в том, что мои персонажи - военные, и что тот стиль языка, который естественный для военных, не приветствуется в литературе)

Maenad
04-29-2018, 05:54 AM
It is also Большая Медведица (https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%91%D0%BE%D0%BB%D1%8C%D1%88%D0%B0%D1%8F_%D0%9C% D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%B8%D1%86%D0%B0) (bolshaya medvedica), which is the translation of Ursa Major. Both names (dipper and ursa) are widely used.

Depending on how old your character is, they might know cartoon Умка (Umka). There is a beautiful lullaby sequence referencing this constellation. Might work for flavor?

morngnstar
04-30-2018, 01:12 AM
It is also Большая Медведица (https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%91%D0%BE%D0%BB%D1%8C%D1%88%D0%B0%D1%8F_%D0%9C% D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%B4%D0%B8%D1%86%D0%B0) (bolshaya medvedica), which is the translation of Ursa Major. Both names (dipper and ursa) are widely used.

Depending on how old your character is, they might know cartoon Умка (Umka). There is a beautiful lullaby sequence referencing this constellation. Might work for flavor?

She's 20, but it's set in 1997. It looks like that cartoon is from 1969, so she would probably know it. How does it relate to the name of the constellation? Is Умка used as a name for the constellation? I like the idea, but it probably doesn't work in the context, because she's trying to communicate to an English speaker. She would probably assume that the English name was a translation of the common Russian name, but not that an American would know about Russian popular culture.

AnxietyLord
10-15-2018, 05:32 PM
Heya, I'm a Russian from St Petersburg, so if anybody needs some proof-reading help for karma points, feel free to ask [:

Michael Myers
10-15-2018, 06:04 PM
Heya, I'm a Russian from St Petersburg, so if anybody needs some proof-reading help for karma points, feel free to ask [:

I'm bookmarking this one. I have an MC who's a Russian spy.

AnxietyLord
10-16-2018, 04:29 PM
I'm bookmarking this one. I have an MC who's a Russian spy.

I guess that's the №1 profession for Russian characters right now haha! (exclaimer: in the book I'm writing MC is also a Russian spy >.>)

Atlantic12
01-19-2019, 12:16 AM
I guess that's the №1 profession for Russian characters right now haha! (exclaimer: in the book I'm writing MC is also a Russian spy >.>)

LOL. Mine too!

Anyone still around who can answer language or cultural questions?