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Lauretta
07-03-2010, 07:03 PM
Ciao a tutti!!!
Chiunque avesse una domanda, un pensiero, o volesse scrivere in italiano puo' utilizzare liberamente questo spazio!!!

Hello all,
Just thought it would be fun to open a thread in Italian. So feel free to ask, write or do whatever you want using the Italian language. Do not be afraid to make a mistake, I'm sure your Italian is much better than my English!!!

Buona scrittura/lettura a tutti!!!!

http://www.twu.ca/life/parents/pizza-hut-double-deep-pizza-730704.jpg

SaraP
07-03-2010, 07:16 PM
Pizza!

See? I can speak italian too! :D

Lauretta
07-03-2010, 07:17 PM
Hehe, mi manca la pizza della mia mamma!!!

OneWriter
07-03-2010, 07:28 PM
Wow! Fai le cose in grande, eh?

Yeshanu
07-03-2010, 07:45 PM
How do you say, "Now I'm hungry?" in Italian. :tongue

cscarlet
07-03-2010, 07:53 PM
va bene! :)

(I haven't spoken Italiano since High School. Oh this makes me want to go back to Italia so badly!)

OneWriter
07-03-2010, 08:02 PM
Gee, Laura, now that I took a second look.... that's a Pizza Hut picture!!!! Oh, no, I'm disappointed in you!!!!! Now this is what you meant to have in there:
http://www.jaunted.com/files/16133/Motorino_Pizza_385.jpg

Dawnstorm
07-04-2010, 01:22 AM
I'm sure your Italian is much better than my English!!!

Non é cosí! Your English's fine; my Italian's... rusty from disuse.

I once watched the Italian version of Who Wants to be a Millionnaire on RAI Uno. It was an odd experience. I felt like some sort of uncertainty principle was at work. I could either understand the questions or the answers, but not both at the same time. Lol.

Pizza (sings to a famous tune):

Mangiare Oh, Oh
Pagare Oh, no no no...

;)

OneWriter
07-04-2010, 02:28 AM
Ha. I see you're in Austria... I spent a whole year in Vienna watching KIKKA and not understanding a thing. Except for the Teletubbies of course, to which I had to oblige because it was the only way my baby would sit and let me spoon-feed her. Yes, now I remember, there was a German version of that show too... I wish I understood the questions, you are way ahead of me!!

Liosse de Velishaf
07-05-2010, 09:15 AM
Ciao a tutti! I'm afraid my Italian has withered a bit over the summer. It's definitely worse than Laura's english, or at least the speaking part is. I can read pretty well.

Dawnstorm
07-05-2010, 11:55 AM
Yes, now I remember, there was a German version of that show too... I wish I understood the questions, you are way ahead of me!!

Well, I didn't understand that many questions. Answers were easier (especially since they often contained proper names, lol). And it helps to be able to read along (though the text does flash away too quickly for me to do a good job). With four years of school Italian, I could be doing better.

As for not understanding Viennese - if you were prepared for German and you get an Austrian dialect instead... Let's just say that there are plenty of dialects I don't understand.

Liosse de Velishaf
07-05-2010, 12:10 PM
How do you say, "Now I'm hungry?" in Italian. :tongue


Ora(?) ho fame.

MissMacchiato
07-05-2010, 01:26 PM
ciao tutti! Ho vissuto in Italia per sei mese l'anno scorso... in Roma! Un molto bello tempo in la mia vita! Ma, la mia Italiano rimasta terribile, mi scusi :)

Lauretta
07-05-2010, 01:46 PM
Ah che bello! Un sacco di persone che parlano italiano!!!

Dawnstorm, I haven't watched Who Wants To Be A Millionaire in ages! Don't even know who the conductor is now... My parents are big fan of it though... It's a way for them to have fun together before dinner, guessing answers and stuff.

MissMacchiato non c'e' bisogno di scusarsi, vai benissimo!

Now I'm hungry would go like: Ora ho fame! Or Che fame! Or Adesso ho fame! Or Ora Mi e' venuta fame! There are so many ways to say the same thing, ugh!

Lauretta
07-05-2010, 01:48 PM
Heh, I was looking for pictures of our home-made pizza, but could find any... >.<



Gee, Laura, now that I took a second look.... that's a Pizza Hut picture!!!! Oh, no, I'm disappointed in you!!!!! Now this is what you meant to have in there:
http://www.jaunted.com/files/16133/Motorino_Pizza_385.jpg

Liosse de Velishaf
07-05-2010, 11:30 PM
ciao tutti! Ho vissuto in Italia per sei mese l'anno scorso... in Roma! Un molto bello tempo in la mia vita! Ma, la mia Italiano rimasta terribile, mi scusi :)


Parli bene. What were you visiting Rome for?

MissMacchiato
07-06-2010, 03:06 AM
mille grazie!

I lived there while I completed an internship for my master's degree. It was a really interesting experience, but the best part was the weekend travel. I visited some amazing places. I really wish I'd bought more shoes in Capri especially :)

Liosse de Velishaf
07-06-2010, 03:09 AM
Ah. My sister was over in Italy last summer for school and then orineteering. She was mostly in Firenze, though. Art students... :rolleyes:

MissMacchiato
07-06-2010, 03:13 AM
Firenze.... LOVED the leather. I swear, that country was hell for shopping. It took 2 friends to assist carrying all the stuff I bought there back to Roma!

JimmyB27
07-07-2010, 09:51 PM
The only Italian words I know are the bad ones. :tongue

MissMacchiato
07-08-2010, 05:27 PM
hey Italiani!

I thought it might be fun to see if we can write a phrase to describe our books. Something not too difficult :) I'll start

La mia libra è una storia romantice. Vespera e Cabry sono cerca per le persone chi ucciso la padre delle Vespera. Piano Piano, loro innammorare :)

Dario D.
07-10-2010, 02:31 AM
Ciao a tutti! Io non parlare MOLTO Italiano, ma sto imparando. :)
(Hi, all! I don't speak MUCH Italian, but I'm learning.)

And now, "on the phone mode":
CIAO A TUTTI! IO NON PARLARE MOLTO ITALIANO, MA STO IMPARANDO!! :D :D

Haha, I love it... I never get tired of hearing my parents' calls to Italy, when they talk (yell) to our relatives. :D (actually, not all of them over there talk like that on the phone, but it seems that most of the older ones do. It might be regional... not sure)

Cliff Face
07-10-2010, 10:30 AM
L'italiano e' une molto bella lingua, ma non mi parlo molto bene. *mangio pane e pollo* :D



How'd I do? (I don't know the keycode to have the e with the little ' on it, hence e'. :P

Liosse de Velishaf
07-10-2010, 11:20 AM
Seems pretty good to me--as a non-native learner. And I totally share your sentiments.

Cliff Face
07-10-2010, 11:30 AM
Si, grazie bella!

Lauretta
07-10-2010, 05:00 PM
L'italiano e' une molto bella lingua, ma non mi parlo molto bene. *mangio pane e pollo* :D



How'd I do? (I don't know the keycode to have the e with the little ' on it, hence e'. :P

I hope you don't mind if I underline the way it should be...? (I wish people did it with my English...)

L'italiano e' uneuna lingua molto bella lingua (lingua goes before molto bella), ma non mi la parlo molto bene. *mangio pane e pollo*

Well done anyway!! Italian is such a difficult language, with a bit of practice you'll improve a lot!!

Lauretta
07-10-2010, 05:02 PM
I don't know the keycode to have the e with the little ' on it, hence e'. :P

e'
Same way I write it with my English keyboard :D

SaraP
07-10-2010, 05:47 PM
L'italiano e' uneuna lingua molto bella lingua (lingua goes before molto bella), ma non mi la parlo molto bene.

The lingua goes before molto bella thing is a characteristic of the romance languages, if I'm not mistaken.

Cliff Face
07-11-2010, 05:28 AM
Hmm... that's one of the difficulties I've always had with other languages... you might want to say "I'm going to watch a fantastic children's program," and you might know the translation for each individual word, but sometimes they go in a different order...

Live and learn, I guess.

ETA: Edited due to popular demand. ;)

Cliff Face
07-11-2010, 05:30 AM
I hope you don't mind if I underline the way it should be...? (I wish people did it with my English...)

L'italiano e' uneuna lingua molto bella lingua (lingua goes before molto bella), ma non mi la parlo molto bene. *mangio pane e pollo*

Well done anyway!! Italian is such a difficult language, with a bit of practice you'll improve a lot!!

I can understand the lingua part (and une was a typo - it was meant to be una when I wrote it...) but why is it "la" instead of "mi" ? Actually, come to think of it, why isn't it "io" ?

Thanks.

Lauretta
07-11-2010, 03:39 PM
It's the way it sounds. Words usually go in a different order.



I can understand the lingua part (and une was a typo - it was meant to be una when I wrote it...) but why is it "la" instead of "mi" ? Actually, come to think of it, why isn't it "io" ?

Thanks.

It is LA, neither me nor io, as it refers to LINGUA.
Italian is a beautiful language, alas I do not speak IT very well
IT is LA, as it refers to the Italian language (which in Italian is feminine).
You can add IO if you want: Io non la parlo bene.

I hope it makes sense?

Cliff Face
07-11-2010, 03:44 PM
Makes enough sense. Grazie. :)

Lauretta
07-11-2010, 03:50 PM
Di niente. :)

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 12:27 PM
How do you say Cliff's - as in, "That is Cliff's fake moustache." I already know how to say Cliff's as in "Cliff is the proud owner of a fake moustache." That'd be Cliff e' right? Or is there a way of shortening Cliff is to Cliff's ?

But I was just thinking, how do you denote ownership with a Cliff's?



(And no, this isn't my round-about way of asking how to say "fake moustache" in Italian. :D Although I'd love to add that phrase to my inventory. :P)

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 12:56 PM
"That is Cliff's fake moustache." goes like "Quelli sono i baffi finti DI Cliff", where the possession is denoted by 'di'

"Cliff is the proud owner of a fake moustache.": "cliff e' l'orgoglioso propietario di baffi finti." As you already said, in this case it's e'.

I won't add all the different rules about possession, it would be too confusing for you to hear :D

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 01:01 PM
BTW, I've found this over the internet, just to start with:

It is important to note that possessives agree in gender and number with the thing possessed, rather than with the possessor:
"i miei amici" <my friends>
"la loro automobile" <their car>.

If ambiguity results from the use of possessives, possession may be expressed by means of "di" with a disjunctive pronoun: "la sua valigia" <his or her or your suitcase>; "la valigia di lui" <his suitcase>.

If the possessor is also the subject of the sentence, "proprio" may be used instead of "suo" or "loro":
"Giovanni porta la propria valigia" <John carries his own suitcase>.
"Proprio" MUST be used after impersonal expressions:
"Bisogna portare le proprie valige" <One must carry one's own pieces of luggage>.

When referring to articles of clothing and parts of the body, the definite article is regularly used instead of the possessive adjective:
"le scarpe" <her shoes>; "la testa" <his head>.

http://www.mmdtkw.org/ItalGram.html

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 03:18 PM
Hmm. Lots of info there. Thanks! I'm always eager to learn something new.

*adds "baffi finti" to list of phrases* :D

(And I just noticed, holding the mouse cursor over a word in this thread gives me a translation. How cool is that?!)

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 03:33 PM
(And I just noticed, holding the mouse cursor over a word in this thread gives me a translation. How cool is that?!)

What? What browser do you use? I don't have that option in mine!!!

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 03:47 PM
Internet Explorer 8.

I'm pretty sure it's just in the International District though... Wait, I'll check.

(it gives 3 translations - I think 1 is French, 1 is Spanish, and 1 is Italian... I'll check the other threads to see if they have the same stuff... ETA: Some words give loads of translations, though they all seem to be in those 3 main languages.)

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 03:52 PM
Me jealous!
But no! I will never switch to IE8!

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 03:53 PM
Okay, that's weird...

It's not just this thread - the Aussie "G'Day" thread has it too, and also the Bordello, so it's not just the International District...

*checks another site*

Okay, this is totally weird - it even works on other sites. It must be Internet Explorer 8 doing it... but it's never done it before, as far as I know, and we haven't downloaded a new version of IE or anything recently... we've had IE8 for ages...

Much weirdness. (Or as the cursor-hold-over tells me, "Casi rareza." :S

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 04:04 PM
Much weirdness. (Or as the cursor-hold-over tells me, "Casi rareza." :S

"Casi rareza." as much weirdness? That's veeery weird!!!!

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 04:06 PM
Just asked mum about the cursor-translation thing, and she thinks it might be a Windows update... she said a friend of hers had the same thing happen, though they disabled it. When you get the pop-up translation, there's an option to disable.

And I held the mouse over an Italian word, and it came back with no results, so obviously whatever this is only translates English words.

*types Steven to see if it pops-up with Stefan*

Nope, doesn't work on names either.

Hmm... very curious.

I think now I'll go watch a DVD. It's 9.30pm here, and I'm getting a little sleepy. I'll see if The L Word has Italian options... :D

Cliff Face
07-15-2010, 04:07 PM
"Casi rareza." as much weirdness? That's veeery weird!!!!

Is it weird because it's a good translation? *curious*

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 10:56 PM
Well, much weirdness would go like: molto piu' strano (or ancora piu' strano)....
Not sure where 'casi rareza' comes from...

OneWriter
07-15-2010, 10:58 PM
Well, much weirdness would go like: molto piu' strano (or ancora piu' strano)....
Not sure where 'casi rareza' comes from...

it's Spanish... literally, it means "almost rarity" but I doubt it's ever used like that in the spoken language. What you hear a lot is "que raro!"

Translator beware!

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 10:59 PM
Hello OneWriter :D Missed you here :D

OneWriter
07-15-2010, 11:01 PM
:Hug2: Sei in Italia?

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 11:08 PM
:Hug2:
Aww, no cara parto sabato, non vedo l'ora!

Lauretta
07-15-2010, 11:09 PM
Tu come stai? Com'e' andato il rientro?

OneWriter
07-15-2010, 11:10 PM
Buon viaggio... e mangia tanti gelati anche per me!!
Rigorosamente produzione artigianale !!

Lauretta
07-16-2010, 12:53 AM
Grazie :D tantissimi gelati... e granite... e focacce... e arancini... e cannoli.... mamma mia, mi e' venuta l'aquolina in bocca!

SaraP
07-16-2010, 01:59 AM
Oooooohhh gelati ... straciatella ...

:drool

Thalia
07-19-2010, 11:24 PM
Ciao a tutti!

^^ That's about the limit of my italiano, heh. I went to Italia in the spring and fell in love with the language... and the food.

Liosse de Velishaf
07-20-2010, 02:08 AM
Ciao, Thalia!

Cliff Face
09-14-2010, 07:45 AM
Buon giorno, le ragazze e i ragazzi!

I just borrowed a couple things from the library to help me learn Italian. I thought I'd mention one of the books in particular - it's a book on gestures in Italy. God, so many hand gestures to mean so many things! I'd be more able to memorise the entire language than learn even 20 of these gestures by heart! But still, it's a fun thing to have a look through. I've read the first 20 pages on the bus, and yeah, I'm in way over my head.

The only gesture I know (in Australian) is the middle finger lol. :D

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 03:06 AM
Buon giorno, le ragazze e i ragazzi!

I just borrowed a couple things from the library to help me learn Italian. I thought I'd mention one of the books in particular - it's a book on gestures in Italy. God, so many hand gestures to mean so many things! I'd be more able to memorise the entire language than learn even 20 of these gestures by heart! But still, it's a fun thing to have a look through. I've read the first 20 pages on the bus, and yeah, I'm in way over my head.

The only gesture I know (in Australian) is the middle finger lol. :D

Be careful, 'cause gestures can vary in meaning from region to region.... could be dangerous! :D

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 03:23 AM
LOL, I recall the gesture used by Joey in Friends. The gesture (flicking fingers out from under the chin, sort of thing) I believe basically means, "Get fucked", but he had words with it - Va fa Napoli!

Va is go... Napoli is Naples. What's fa?

/curious

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 04:12 AM
LOL, I recall the gesture used by Joey in Friends. The gesture (flicking fingers out from under the chin, sort of thing) I believe basically means, "Get fucked", but he had words with it - Va fa Napoli!

Va is go... Napoli is Naples. What's fa?

/curious

:roll: It actually doesn't mean anything... The REAL insult is vaffanculo (which is basically f*** off), but that's not the gesture that would accompany it. The gesture would be: you place your left hand on the inside of your right elbow and then bend up your right arm.
In high school we used to say: "Do you know where my grandpa used to carry his umbrella? Here!" and we'd make the gesture. :)

Oh, and I suppose you know that the gesture Texans love so much (pinky and index fingers out from a fist) is an insult in Italy?

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 04:31 AM
I had heard about the Horns gesture being an insult...

I listen to metal music, so while watching live shows there are always heaps of those horns going up in the air. I only recently realised it was a Texan thing too while reading a book about Italy by some American who bought a house near Tuscany (Frances Mayes, if you're interested... there are 3 of her books out) when she said "Don't be tempted to make the horn sign to show your support for Texan [some sports team] - in Italy it means something entirely different." And all I could thing was, "But that's just metal?"

So... what DO the horns mean in Italian gestures? ;)

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 04:38 AM
And just out of curiosity, would a metal live DVD where the crowd is doing the horns be censored when released in Italy?

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 04:48 AM
I had heard about the Horns gesture being an insult...

I listen to metal music, so while watching live shows there are always heaps of those horns going up in the air. I only recently realised it was a Texan thing too while reading a book about Italy by some American who bought a house near Tuscany (Frances Mayes, if you're interested... there are 3 of her books out) when she said "Don't be tempted to make the horn sign to show your support for Texan [some sports team] - in Italy it means something entirely different." And all I could thing was, "But that's just metal?"

So... what DO the horns mean in Italian gestures? ;)

She wrote THREE books? Mannn, I'm in the wrong genre... Did you watch the movie? That's where I grew up. :) The movie sucked (except for Bova... Bova's cute!!!), but the places are gorgeous... Well, I'm biased. ;)

Anyways, the horns are usually accompanied by the insult "cornuto" o "becco." They both mean "you've got horns" and to have horns in Italy means your wife is sleeping with another man. Yes, it is an exclusively masculine insult. We all know that's so only in Italy, especially like you say the new generations. Still, it's hilarious to see Texans greet one another with that gesture.

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 04:50 AM
And just out of curiosity, would a metal live DVD where the crowd is doing the horns be censored when released in Italy?

Nothing gets censored in Italy!! Not even the prime minister...
Oooops, correction: nothing VULGAR gets censored in Italy.

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 05:25 AM
Italy just keeps getting better and better!

And btw, what movie are you talking about? Even though you didn't like it, I'm sure I'd appreciate the scenery...

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 05:48 AM
Under the Tuscan sun... they made a movie out of the book. I didn't read the book, I'm told the book is much better than the movie. If you happen to watch it, that's where I grew up. Yeah. And now I'm here. Heh.

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 05:54 AM
Which part of Tuscany did you grow up in? The book's set in Cortona, though there are chapters dealing with exploring the rest of Tuscany.

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 05:59 AM
Her house is in the country side though, right?
I actually grew up much closer to the sea (a couple of hours from Cortona), but still in the country, so same golden hills covered in sunflowers in July, speckled with old villas surrounded by cypresses.... Ah, I get sentimental... :)
Have you ever been to Italy?

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 06:08 AM
Yes, her house (Bramasole) is in the country just out of Cortona.

And no, I've never been to Italy! *hand to forehead* Oh, my deprived life!

First stop for me would be Florence, then Venice, then Rome. And a great many vineyards along the way.

Although I have been told to go to Siena, so maybe I could find time for that.

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 06:14 AM
Siena, San Gimignano, Populonia, Lucca, Le Cinque Terre, Porto Fino... Frankly, the big cities, though they have beautiful architecture and memorable art, they are loud and polluted. And loud. And polluted. This is just my opinion, so take it with a grain of salt, but I find it more fun to visit the small towns because then you can walk everywhere (often the "centro storico", the historic part, is closed to traffic and full of tiny shops with lots of arts and crafts and of course bar and gelaterie...) and enjoy a lot more. I'd be happy to suggest an itinerary!! :D

Would love to visit Australia some day, BTW.

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 06:30 AM
I'm in one of the sleepiest parts of Australia - Adelaide suburbs, in South Australia. It's not happening like Melbourne, Perth and Sydney, it's not important like Canberra, it's not "true blue" like Darwin. The only other major city in Australia that's possibly as sleepy as Adelaide is Hobart, on the island of Tasmania. Because they're cut off from the rest of the country, they don't get all that much tourism, and so they're economy isn't quite as lavish as, say, Sydney. And all this means that they pretty much just coast along, not making much impact on Australian culture and not being impacted by Australian culture as much as other places.

If you visit Australia, I'd recommend Perth in Western Australia. I've never been there myself (want to though!) but I've heard MANY great things about it, the best part being the weather (I say best, because here in Adelaide we either have torrential rain or body-melting heat most of the time, and it kills me). My brother lived in Perth for about a year... he loved it over there. And they have a better night-life than Adelaide, as well as the better weather.

From Perth, you should go over to Sydney, hire a car and spend 2 days in Canberra, visiting landmark monuments, and then hop down to Melbourne for the sport and culture.

I don't even recommend Adelaide - I find it quite boring. We're known as the city of churches, however, so perhaps that might remind you of Italy a little, even though our churches aren't anywhere near as grand.

For shopping, I'd stick with Melbourne. I've heard great things about the shopping in Melbourne. I even heard about someone living in Sydney, which is meant to be the "best" city in Australia, and she would do a day-trip (by plane) down to Melbourne to do her fashion shopping.

But yeah - Perth, Melbourne, Sydney and Canberra are the places I'd recommend. If you like theme parks, half a week on the Gold Coast would satisfy you.

If you want to see the country places, then South Australia is the only place I know anything about regarding country places. There's the Riverland - with a big river and lots of wineries. And then there's the far-South of Adelaide, where I used to live, which again has a lot of wineries, but doesn't get quite as extreme weather as the Riverland does. And it's easier to get back to civilisation from the far-South of Adelaide.

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 06:33 AM
And South Australia, like Italy, is famous for its wine, so we have that at least...

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 06:44 AM
I'm taking notes -- thanks! :D

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 06:51 AM
The G'Day thread also has some interesting facts. You've just got to sift through the talk of coffee and beer. ;)

I don't suppose you'd know what sort of paperwork I'd need to be able to work in Italy, so I could afford to stay there a bit longer when I eventually do go over for a holiday?

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 07:08 AM
No, but I can ask. Are you looking at day jobs (like hotels, restaurants, etc) or something more specific? Jobs are hard these days...

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 07:14 AM
I'd be terrible as a waiter (I don't eat a great variety of food, so looking at a plate in a restaurant I wouldn't be able to say, "Okay, this is the steak with whatever.") but maybe something low-key, like washing dishes or working the register (which I know isn't exactly low-key, but at least I don't have to deal directly with food...) or something.

I'm not the most employable person. I'm studying Retail right now, so maybe I could work in a store in Italy as a temp?

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 07:15 AM
Ideally I'd make enough money from writing to finance a 3-month visit to Italy, but I won't hold my breath. ;)

SaraP
09-18-2010, 11:19 AM
Anyways, the horns are usually accompanied by the insult "cornuto" o "becco." They both mean "you've got horns" and to have horns in Italy means your wife is sleeping with another man. Yes, it is an exclusively masculine insult. We all know that's so only in Italy, especially like you say the new generations. Still, it's hilarious to see Texans greet one another with that gesture.

Just chiming in to say that we have the same thing in portuguese.

We mediterraneans are very classy. ;)

Cliff Face
09-18-2010, 12:16 PM
Now I can astound metal fans by telling them that the devil horns they're so fond of mean "Your wife is having an affair" in Italy and Portugal!

Sweet!

OneWriter
09-18-2010, 05:19 PM
Just chiming in to say that we have the same thing in portuguese.

We mediterraneans are very classy. ;)

Besides the horns, what is it with us Mediterraneans that we always, always blame it on the sister or the mother???? All insults, I mean, they all go back to either the sister or the mother... and eventually all the way back to Eve. Because you know, Eve apparently was the mother of all... Oh well, I'll stop here.

SaraP
09-18-2010, 05:45 PM
Yeah, mothers, especially, have a really bad rep.

Cliff Face
09-19-2010, 05:42 AM
Just a theory but:

I think women have been insulted because men are scared of them in a very animalistic way. First off, very few men actually understand women all of the time. Secondly, the animal kingdom is full of species where the female is dominant. Thirdly, men in times past would run around with weapons killing each other and proclaiming glory, while women developed skills that were a little more useful to the future of mankind, such as intricacies of construction and design, cleanliness and speech.

What all this amounts to is that men probably felt threatened by women in the past, and because of that, and the woman's proficiency with home-style work, the men tried to make women believe that working in the home was inferior to doing battle and working in the fields. Women probably accepted these taunts because men were typically more violent than they were, and the women had their own level of fear (again, through a significant lack of understanding).

Women seem to have just wanted a nice life for themselves, whereas men developed strong egos and treated women like property. From there, insults such as the horns were born.



Like I said, just a theory.

Cliff Face
09-21-2010, 05:05 PM
I can't find the movie of "Under The Tuscan Sun"... I has a sad.

OneWriter
09-22-2010, 12:43 AM
I can't find the movie of "Under The Tuscan Sun"... I has a sad.

Really? You mean, not even on Netflix or Blockbusters?
Well, from what I'm told the book is the real thing, so...

Cliff Face
09-22-2010, 02:34 AM
I just looked in my local DVD store, which stocks a LOT of stuff, and it wasn't there.

I've never used Netflix... then again, I don't have a credit card...

Cliff Face
09-22-2010, 05:35 AM
Okay, so I went back to my DVD store today, and tried to order the movie. The guy searched his computer for it, found it and said, "Hang on, let me just check if it's in stock."

So I was like, "I looked for it yesterday, and it wasn't there."

2 minutes later he comes back holding the movie in his hand... He explained it to me - "Sometimes movies get stored underneath the shelves if there isn't enough space. It was down there."

"Oh, okay."

So I now own Under The Tuscan Sun! For $10! Woo!

I was surprised to read the back cover and find out that it's a romantic movie... there's not a whole lot of romance in the book. It's more about fixing up the house and exploring Tuscany and having visitors from overseas drop by...

It should be interesting. :)

OneWriter
09-22-2010, 06:31 AM
I was surprised to read the back cover and find out that it's a romantic movie... there's not a whole lot of romance in the book. It's more about fixing up the house and exploring Tuscany and having visitors from overseas drop by...

It should be interesting. :)

Really? Oh, now I'm curious to see what you think.
See, the movie is ALL about how she needs a man in her life, but I mean, to the point that you wanna scream, "Get a grip on yourself, lady!"

Though, you know, if Bova were to come knock on my door, maybe I'd get a little needy like that too... Heh.

Cliff Face
09-22-2010, 06:36 AM
There's no mention of Bova in the book. In fact, Frances Mayes has a partner who's from America like her...

Methinks they took a large amount of artistic license to turn it into a movie...

I'll watch it soon. :)

OneWriter
09-22-2010, 06:41 AM
Actually, a part from the fact that he's awfully cute, I was offended by the character he portrays. He's the typical Latin lover who only wants to get in her pants. And they sort of make you think that all Italian man are like that. Well, if they are, I guess I missed up on that!! OK, better stop now, before my husband catches me... ;)

Cliff Face
09-22-2010, 09:47 AM
I just watched it. I didn't see any Bova... the only guy Frances slept with was Marcello. Also, the writer at the end, Ed, is Frances's partner in the book. I didn't like the movie as much as the book... I found Frances's character a little less classy than in the book.

And there wasn't as much scenery as I'd hoped for.

It was really strange watching a love story based on a non-fiction book about her love affair with Italy. I found I couldn't suspend my disbelief because I kept thinking, "No, this is meant to be a real person, and this stuff never happened."

Meh.

Cliff Face
09-22-2010, 12:56 PM
And the infuriating part is that it's a movie filmed in Italy about Italy, and I can't get Italian subtitles on it.

*grr*

OneWriter
09-22-2010, 05:46 PM
Bova is the actor who plays Marcello, sorry, should've said that. He's famous in Italy. I think he played a part in housewives too, but I never watched the show. Funny about the subtitles! Listen, if you want, I can recommend a few Italian movies that are REALLY good.

Cliff Face
09-23-2010, 06:20 AM
Ooh, yes please! Providing I can get them in Australia...

One thing I've noticed with DVDs sold in Australia is that not one that I've seen has the option of Italian subtitles. It sucks.

But please, recommend some movies!

Cliff Face
09-23-2010, 08:53 AM
I just finished reading "Under The Tuscan Sun" and it must've been a later edition, because the last chapter is all about the movie.

I recommend this book.

Meanwhile, I read the 3rd book first, the 1st book second, and now I have to read the 2nd book. Yeah.

OneWriter
09-23-2010, 09:45 AM
If you can find Italian movies there, then they should by default have English subtitles... OK, these are classics: Nuovo Cinema Paradiso (directed by Tornatore, but get the "short" version, or watch only the first half of the long one); Mediterraneo with Diego Abatantuono; Il Postino with Massimo Troisi (the problem with Troisi is that he has a strong Napolitan accent, and even for me he's hard to follow... but this movie is poetic!!), Non ci resta che piangere, with Troisi and Benigni... Oh, and then of course, a bunch of Benigni's movies: La vita e' bella, but also the lighter/funny ones like Il piccolo diavolo. Oh, I just thought of another one: Willy Signori e vengo da lontano, directed by Francesco Nuti... Noy sure how many of these you'll be able to find though. They're old.. hey, but not THAT old, ok??? ;)

Cliff Face
09-23-2010, 09:52 AM
I'll make a note of them and have a look around, but I don't like my chances. I might have to buy them off the Internet. I have a savings PayPal account... with no money in it. I'd have to transfer money into it, which takes like 10 days, and *then* I can order things from the net.

Cheers!

Cliff Face
09-23-2010, 03:54 PM
Okay, I've copied the names of the movies down onto paper, so tomorrow when I go shopping I'll have a look for them. :)

SaraP
09-23-2010, 04:42 PM
I believe you might find Cinema Paradiso, Il Postino and La vita e' bella easier than the other ones. They were in the Oscar race. I remember when Roberto Benigni won an Oscar with La vita e' bella, it was so funny.

All three are wonderful movies, but I only saw La vita e' bella once and I don't think I could watch it again. The story is just too powerful and it tore me apart.

Cliff Face
09-23-2010, 04:49 PM
I'll keep that in mind. :)

OneWriter
09-23-2010, 05:02 PM
I'll make a note of them and have a look around, but I don't like my chances. I might have to buy them off the Internet. I have a savings PayPal account... with no money in it. I'd have to transfer money into it, which takes like 10 days, and *then* I can order things from the net.

Cheers!

Oh don't buy them... What if you don't like them, then you're gonna come hunt me down... ;) At least read the reviews first!!!
There has been a wonderful, wonderful detective series lately, but it takes place in Sicily and some of the language is hard to follow... but it's very, very well done. It's called Commissario Montalbano.

OneWriter
09-23-2010, 05:04 PM
And DON'T buy the integral version of Nuovo Cinema Paradiso!!! Believe me, you go from, "Wow, this is an AWESOME movie" to "Argh... cut it, already!!!"

Cliff Face
09-24-2010, 03:39 AM
I'd heard of Montalbano actually. As soon as you said "Sicilian detective" that's what I thought of. My step-sister (who lives in England) has a fiance who is from Sicily, though I've never met him...

And I'm not opposed to buying movies based on Italy alone, even if I don't like the story. It's a language I want to learn and a place I want to go to someday, so in my mind any movie about Italy (preferably spoken in Italian) will be good whether or not I like the story.

:)

Cliff Face
09-24-2010, 10:49 AM
Okay, so I couldn't find any of those movies. Not a single title written in Italian in my local DVD store.

I'm going to try to find a place in the city that sells foreign movies (and hopefully books too!).

mario_c
10-17-2010, 11:05 AM
Hey paisano, your DVD store sucks. Anyway, it's hard to pick a favorite Italian movie - we're talking about a nation with a massive cinematic legacy from Rossellini's neo-realism to Argento's "giallo" operatic horror to Fellini to modern classics like Gomorrah. Some that I've loved:
L'Avventura, a 1960s film by Antonioni
The Sicilian
La Dolce Vita and Juliet Of The Spirits (your requisite Fellini)
That should get you started. Buono appetito!

OneWriter
10-17-2010, 06:59 PM
Oh yeah, I forgot the classics... Antonioni, Fellini, Dario Argento.
It's such a pity that a country which such great art forms is falling so behind....

mario_c
10-27-2010, 06:32 AM
I'm trying to reconnect with my Italiano knowledge base, so I just had to share this - from one of those How To Curse in Italian type books (I know, I have a guy sense of humor, but it's a good phrasebook. Hint: the bella on the back cover is holding fruit at a suggestive angle :D). In traffic you can yell "Ti conviene tornare sull'asino." :ROFL: You're essentially telling the driver s/he should commute to work on a donkey.

Cliff Face
10-27-2010, 07:51 AM
Isn't "punnane" a swear in Italian?

That's about the only one I know...

mario_c
10-30-2010, 07:06 AM
Punani==p^$$# :D

SaraP
12-02-2010, 02:32 PM
Ciao a tutti!

(I tried asking for a favor in italian, but thought I better not. :D Here (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showpost.php?p=5560889&postcount=103)'s the request though. ;) )

yoghurtelf
12-14-2010, 08:21 AM
I'm not Italian, but I have lots of Italo-Australian friends, AND I have visited Italy before - loved it!!

Oh, and Lacuna Coil are one of my favourite bands! :) Trying to teach myself to sing "Senzafine" so I can do a cover! :D

MissMacchiato
12-14-2010, 08:27 AM
I recently rediscovered an italian phrase - per guardare ancora fuori. I'd forgotten it meant as close as you can to "can't wait" or "looking forward to"

rajkashana
12-16-2010, 03:46 PM
Ciao a tutti! Good to see an Italian thread.


Se qualcuno vuole fare due chiacchere, fammi sapere. :D

rajkashana
12-16-2010, 03:55 PM
I'm not Italian, but I have lots of Italo-Australian friends, AND I have visited Italy before - loved it!!

Oh, and Lacuna Coil are one of my favourite bands! :) Trying to teach myself to sing "Senzafine" so I can do a cover! :D

I agree completely. I worked there for few years. Italy is one of the most beautiful countries I have visited. And the Ice Creams are the best. :D

MissMacchiato
12-16-2010, 04:00 PM
Raj, tu vivo in Italia (adesso)? La mia Italiano è terrible, specialmente, dopo ho tornato Australia

OneWriter
12-16-2010, 05:13 PM
Isn't "punnane" a swear in Italian?

That's about the only one I know...

LOL. No, puttana is a bad word. Means whore.

OneWriter
12-16-2010, 05:14 PM
I recently rediscovered an italian phrase - per guardare ancora fuori. I'd forgotten it meant as close as you can to "can't wait" or "looking forward to"

No, sorry. "Can't wait" or "I look forward to" gets translated into "Non vedo l'ora."

rajkashana
01-03-2011, 08:08 PM
Raj, tu vivo in Italia (adesso)? La mia Italiano è terrible, specialmente, dopo ho tornato Australia

No, adesso abito in India. Invece, tu abiti in Australia? Ho sentito che é un piase molto bello. :)

LimariC
02-27-2011, 04:56 AM
Ciao Lauretta e tutti! Sono portoricana, ma ho bisogno degli amici italiana per imparare la bella lingua Italiana!

Lo ho scritto bene?

Hahaha

crunchyblanket
03-08-2011, 06:00 PM
Ciao a tutti! Sto imparando l'italiano. Mio marito e Siciliano. I'm still not very good, unfortunately! I'd love to be able to speak it properly some day, it's such a beautiful language.

Luana Spinetti
09-07-2011, 12:25 AM
Ciao ragazzi! :D Bé, io sono italiana (e vivo in Italia) per cui se aveste bisogno di aiuto con la lingua, sarò felice di darvi una mano. ^_^

Night_Writer
11-17-2011, 10:10 AM
Finalmente ho trovato gl'italiani! Non sapevo dove fossero nascosti. Sono nata negli Stati Uniti, ma la mia famiglia è italiana, e l'italiano era l'unica lingua che sentivo fin'a quando cominciai la scuola a cinque anni.

Uno dei miei autori preferiti è Grazia Deledda. Canne al Vento è un capolavore.


Yeah, and me likes that pizza stuff, too.

avl94
04-19-2012, 06:28 AM
Io parlo poco Italiano. E tu?

Night_Writer
04-19-2012, 07:31 AM
Anch'io parlo un poco del'italiano.

Ci sta gia un filo (thread) che forse sarebbe molto interesante per Lei.

Italiano!
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=184718

avl94
04-19-2012, 07:41 AM
hehe Me despiace. Non vedo un altro filo.

Night_Writer
04-19-2012, 08:09 AM
Il link che ti ho dato non funziona? Molto strano. Va bene. Il filo chiamato "Italiano!" sta sulla pagina 3 or 4 della forum International District.

avl94
04-19-2012, 08:15 AM
No no no. Il tuo link funziona perfecto. Il mio occhio non funziona perfecto, quando ho cercata. :P

GrunAugen
09-17-2012, 09:02 PM
Ciao! Ero in Italia per tre anni.

Unfortunately, I only speak the language and can't communicate as much in writing. I'm not perfectly fluent, though I'm sure I could still get by. I learned to speak Italian through conversation only... in Naples. (I may be alone in this, but I thought Naples was a diamond in the rough!) When I speak, my Neapolitan accent is so thick, the northerners don't understand me. Ah, well. Such is life.

Anyhow, I'm new and was very excited when I saw this thread. I wanted to revive it in case anyone else is looking for an Italian thread, too.

Tepelus
10-25-2012, 06:44 AM
Hi all! Wondering if you could translate a bit of dialogue for me into Italian. A little about the work, first. My story takes place in the 15th century (Hungary, for the most part). My MC has a tutor who is teaching him Italian, the queen's Italian, as she is from Naples. This is a short greeting my MC says to a group of young women, his wife and her ladies. He says to them:


“Good day, ladies. You all look beautiful on this splendid morning.”He pretty much says it to be a show off, since none of them understand a word of it. I may have more in the future, so you may see me again. Thanks in advance.

Dryad
10-25-2012, 07:41 AM
Ciao a tutti! Non ho realizzatto che c'e un filo qui per italiano. Ho abitato a Venezia per tre anni ma non ho mai parlatto bene l'italiano e adesso non lo parlatto per un sacco di anni.

Tepelus, you want someone with 15th century Neapolitan knowledge, and that's not me! Good luck, though.

Tepelus
10-26-2012, 01:03 AM
Ah, but thanks for responding anyway. I don't know anything about Italian so I don't know how different the dialects are from one area to the next, maybe it won't matter so much with that short bit I need to translate, but I'll wait and see if anyone else has anything to say about it.

Shinkicker
10-28-2012, 05:32 PM
Vasco Rossi o Luciano Ligabue? Che e la migliore? :)

crunchyblanket
10-28-2012, 05:37 PM
I speak, my Neapolitan accent is so thick, the northerners don't understand me.


Mr Crunchy e Siciliano and even he doesn't understand the Neapolitan accent :D I work with a doctor from Napoli. It really is the strangest sound, like talking from the back of the throat. Oddly pleasant sounding, though.

Dryad
10-29-2012, 10:54 PM
Tepelus, the differences are huge, especially when you bring in your timeframe. To give you an idea, I encountered plenty of modern Venetians who couldn't understand Italian. (They spoke Venetian.) If you're looking for authenticity you'll need someone with very specific knowledge.

Shinkicker, Ligabue senza dubbio.

Dodici
12-15-2012, 01:40 PM
Just checking in :)

Ciao ai miei compatrioti ;)

Cliff Face
05-19-2013, 02:43 PM
Just had a quick Italian question about food. :)

Okay, here in Australia, we have a mishmash of cultures, resulting in one instance in what I ate for dinner tonight (and have had a lot): Chicken Parmigiana.

Basically, it's a Chicken Schnitzel (German, right?) but with Parmigiana sauce on top.

Now the question is what sort of things can or do go into a Parmigiana topping. Because some places do it as just cheese and some tomato-based sort-of thing, but some other places will add bacon or something like that.

So yeah - please explain this to me! Is it normal for the topping to vary from place to place? What precisely does "Parmigiana" mean? Is it related to parmesan cheese?

<-- clueless.

Thanks in advance. :)

Roadlawyer
05-26-2013, 11:53 PM
What you call chicken parmigiana, the one with a tomato based sauce on it, is non-existent in Italy. A true chicken parmigiana is a chicken cutlet, rolled in breadcrumbs and parmesan cheese, then sauteed in butter and olive oil. Parmigiano refers to Parmigiano Reggiano, the king of Italian cheeses, which comes from Parma a province in the region of Emilia. Probably much more than you wanted to know. Parmesan and Parmigiano Reggiano are the same thing...sorta.

Cliff Face
05-27-2013, 03:13 AM
Oh, wow, thanks. :)

So now I know that I won't be able to order one of those in Italy without having something totally different arrive on my plate. :tongue

Well, not totally different, but yeah. Y'know, I'm not even sure they use Parmesan cheese on the ones down here. It may be a different type of cheese.

Thanks. :)

Roadlawyer
05-27-2013, 12:30 PM
Don't worry, you won't miss it. The food here is fabulous.

Cliff Face
05-27-2013, 01:51 PM
Yeah, I've heard that. It's one of the reasons I really want to make it over there some day. And the people, and atmosphere. :)

Kind of need money for flights and accommodation first, though. Ack!

Jett.
01-10-2014, 10:29 PM
Salve!

Sono ormai tanti anni che non vivo piu' in Italia, tanto che ormai neppure I miei pensieri sono in italiano. Fortunatamente la capacita' di leggere e capire la lingua non diminuisce con gli anni :)

Saluti!

Cliff Face
01-11-2014, 11:14 AM
I think I understood what you said there, apart from a few words. Good to know I can still feel my way around the language. :)

(I can't, however, write the above in Italian.)

Cliff Face
02-07-2014, 01:05 PM
Random question for the Italians out there. I just had dinner at a place called "Caffe Primo". (The food was excellent, if anyone cares. :))

Anyway, I was curious about whether that translates into English as "Coffee First", or if it gets reversed in translation to "First Coffee". I could never get the hang of sentence construction and word orders when I studied Italian all those years ago.

Or am I misremembering and "Caffe" means "Cafeteria" and "Coffee" is spelled as "Caffee"? I'm pretty sure I was right the first time around, but you never know. :)

Jett.
02-08-2014, 01:37 AM
^ I'm losing my Italian, but I'd say that "Caffè Primo" means "Prime Coffee".
You're right. In Italian adjectives usually come after nouns. Though if you're counting the coffees, it's:
il primo caffè, il secondo caffè, il terzo caffè, ...
Can't tell you why...

As far as I used to know, "Caffetteria" means coffee shop, for which in some places the French word, "café", is used.

Since every language seems to be spelling the brew differently although it's basically the same word, I quit and drink tea, tè, tee... nevermind.

Let me sit here with you and wait for someone with more specific knowledge.

Cliff Face
02-08-2014, 03:32 AM
Thanks. :)

I'm not sure where the native Italian speakers of AW have gotten to, to be honest. This thread was active for a while there, but lately there haven't been many posts at all.

Pegster
12-01-2015, 06:58 PM
This thread is probably dead, but there's enough ambiguity that Caffe Primo could mean "Drink coffee first," like Americans will, instead of last, dopo il pasto, like Italians will if they drink any at all. Or it could be a brand name. I vaguely recall seeing a coffee brand, like Lavazza or Kimbo, that was Caffe Primo. I hope the food was good.

Pegster
12-01-2015, 07:05 PM
October I visited some friends in Scandicci and we drove up to Orvieto. After unsuccessfully leaving my body at the bottom of Il Pozzo di San Patrizio, they dragged me across a very windy bridge to Civita di Bagnoregio. Quiet, cozy walled village framed by startling beautiful countryside, ala the Badlands of North and South Dakota. Mi raccomando, go see it before it falls off. Didn't see many people. Saw some forty cats, a touch aloof as cats will, but the mangy ones were friendly.

Cliff Face
12-03-2015, 02:39 PM
Ciao! Good to see this thread again, after so long. And curiously enough, I used a little Italian knowledge today to stun and impress my coworkers. :tongue Basically, there was a sign in Latin that they were trying to figure out - it said Deo Duce. They knew Deo meant God, but had no idea about Duce. Then I remembered the word Doge as being assigned to the leader of Venice, so hesitantly offered the idea that Duce could have something to do with leadership. After some Google-translating, "Deo Duce" was deigned "God as guide/leader".

Mwuhahaahhaa! Viva l'italiano! :tongue

Pegster
12-04-2015, 01:22 AM
Auguri! Stretching the polyglot tongue is probably the cause of all that coughing. I think un po' di miele will soothe that.

J.S.F.
12-04-2015, 06:10 AM
Question for the Italian contingent. In a recent novel, I used the word straniero to indicate "foreigner". Is that the correct word to use? I would hate to make a mistake in this. My Google search turned up that word, so if I am wrong, could someone please correct me or PM with the correct term to use? Much appreciated in advance.

Tazlima
12-04-2015, 06:25 AM
Question for the Italian contingent. In a recent novel, I used the word straniero to indicate "foreigner". Is that the correct word to use? I would hate to make a mistake in this. My Google search turned up that word, so if I am wrong, could someone please correct me or PM with the correct term to use? Much appreciated in advance.

Yes, with a caveat. Straniero specifically refers to an individual, male foreigner. If you're referring to an individual female foreigner, it would be straniera. There are additional variations when the word is pluralized, but I'm guessing you don't need those.

Cliff Face
12-04-2015, 12:38 PM
Yep, the gender and number of foreigners will change how it's written (especially if you use an Italian version of "the" before it).

J.S.F.
12-04-2015, 03:33 PM
To Tazlima and Cliff Face, thank you both. I figured, like French, the word would have a feminine usage and spelling as well. In the scene where it's used, some thugs are hunting the hero who is a transgenic cat-guy. He has his wife and a couple of other transgenic friends along. The thugs are talking amongst themselves, so the word pops up and the MC asks one of his friends what it means. I think you've answered my question, so for now I'll let it stand in the novel and if it needs to be edited later on (when the editor gets back to me) I shall do so.

Thank you once again. :)

WhatIsEnglish
01-07-2016, 12:21 AM
Vedo che la discussione è un po' vecchia. Spero di non fare necroposting, ma era l'unica all'alternativa all'aprire una discussione clone.
Avrei qualche domanda per quelli di voi che hanno venduto racconti negli USA. E più nello specifico per quanto riguarda il pagamento degli stessi. Avete ricevuto i soldi tramite PayPal o trasferimenti bancari? E avete dovuto dichiarare qualcosa, all'IRS e/o all'INPS?
Spero ci sia ancora gente che controlli questa discussione di tanto in tanto.


I see the thread is quite old and I hope I'm not necroposting right now, but really this was the only way to do this instead of creating another thread. So. I have a couple questions for those of you who have sold short stories to U.S. markets. More specifically, my questions are about the payments. Did the publishers use PayPal or bank transfers? And did you guys have to declare anything to either the IRS and/or the INPS?
I hope there's still someone checking on this thread once in a while.

Cliff Face
01-07-2016, 01:53 PM
(Sorry I can't reply in Italian - my grasp of the language isn't robust enough.)

Umm, by "selling to a US market", I'm assuming that means you live in Italy? I can't give specific answers (and will gladly point out that taking legal/financial advice from an AWer shouldn't stop you from asking a professional's opinion), but from what I can gather, here's how it would work:

If the money is being earned through an American company, then you would need to acknowledge that with the IRS. For instance, if you self-publish on Amazon, which is an American-owned company, then you need to pay taxes to America on your earnings-from-Amazon. So to extrapolate from that, I'd imagine that if a publisher was American-owned, then yes, the IRS would come into it in some way.

However, I seem to recall hearing that if you have an agent, then they operate as something akin to a middle-man. Like, if your agent is in Italy with you, then the fact that they handle your writing income (in order to take their cut) and then pay you, well, then on your end I would assume it means you're earning within your own country.

No idea about PayPal or bank transfers... I've heard AWers talking about being paid by PayPal, and I've heard other AWers talking about being paid by a cheque mailed to them. Not sure about the bank transfers.

My best advice, however, would be to find someone who knows about international tax law. (Many accountants are at least vaguely knowledgeable of such things - usually at least one per small firm.)

Anyway, hope that helps. Good luck with your writing, welcome to AW, and viva l'italia! :D

WhatIsEnglish
01-07-2016, 04:32 PM
Thanks, Cliff, you've been very thorough. I'll try and seek legal advice over here (yes, I do live in Italy), and also see what I can find about that ITIN-thingy.

Cliff Face
01-09-2016, 05:55 AM
Prego. :)

braveboy
08-01-2017, 04:37 AM
I was a prisoner of matrimony for almost 20 years in Pozzuoli (Naples) Italy prior to escaping. Life was never boring, I must admit.
A few years ago my company at the time sent me to Vicenza in northern Italy, and the first time my (American) wife and I
met our new land lady when we were renting an apartment, the first thing she did was compliment me on my Italian speaking ability,
but the next sentence was to demand to know how come I had that terrible Napolitan' accent. LOL. I replied that your accent is who you sleep with.
While she was talking I was also wondering where in the world had she herself learned Italian. ha. I soon found out I was the only person in the
city speaking correctly and had no one to talk to until I found a Napolitano in exile working in a pizzeria there.
There is a big difference there between north and south Italia, be it the spoken language, the food (go South for good eating, btw.) or obeying laws.
and about a thousand other things.
At the end of the day though, It's all good.
Ci vediamo
Doug

braveboy
08-01-2017, 04:48 AM
I was a prisoner of matrimony for almost 20 years in Pozzuoli (Naples) Italy prior to escaping. Life was never boring, I must admit.
A few years ago my company at the time sent me to Vicenza in northern Italy, and the first time my (American) wife and I
met our new land lady when we were renting an apartment, the first thing she did was compliment me on my Italian speaking ability,
but the next sentence was to demand to know how come I had that terrible Napolitan' accent. LOL. I replied that your accent is who you sleep with.
While she was talking I was also wondering where in the world had she herself learned Italian. ha. I soon found out I was the only person in the
city speaking correctly and had no one to talk to until I found a Napolitano in exile working in a pizzeria there.
There is a big difference there between north and south Italia, be it the spoken language, the food (go South for good eating, btw.) or obeying laws.
and about a thousand other things.
At the end of the day though, It's all good.
Ci vediamo
Doug

Helix
08-01-2017, 05:27 AM
That's one way of increasing your post count!

Yasia
11-29-2018, 08:22 PM
So, may be stupid of me, but is anyone still alive? Because it would be nice to chat with someone from the same country I live in.

Tazlima
11-29-2018, 08:46 PM
Io sono negli Stati Uniti, pero abitavo in Italia per quattro anni e sarei lieta a parlare, anche se non sempre scrivo correttamente.

(Mi dispiace che non posso utillizare gli accenti sopra le parole. Qui a lavoro devo lasciare i messagi in fretta, perche il capo passa frequentamente dietro mia scrivania e puo vedere che faccio).

Yasia
11-29-2018, 09:50 PM
Oh, wow, ciao.
Per che motivo hai abitato per quattro anni in italia?

Tazlima
11-29-2018, 10:13 PM
Andavo a universita a Roma. Era molto divertente, e particolarmente interressante perche ci stavo durante il cambio al Euro. Inizialmente, studiavo musica negli Stati Uniti, ma me sembrava che imparavo solamente un singolo sogetto. Deciso a muovere a una scuola al estero, e cosi se non imparavo niente di valore in scuola, almeno impararei una seconda lingua.

Sfortunatamente, dopo non potevo trovare lavoro e dovevo tornare qui. Ora sono in New Orleans. E una bella citta, e mi piace abbastanza bene, ma dopo cosi tanti anni, mi manca ancora Italia.

Di dov'e siete originalmente? And com'e mai ha lasciato?

Yasia
11-29-2018, 10:53 PM
New Orleans! Vorrei tantissimo visitarla!
In realtà io non ho lasciato l'Italia e ci vivo ancora, e studio. Sono della zona attorno a Milano.
Devo dire che non ho ancora visitato bene Roma anche se mi piacerebbe molto e sono contenta che la sua esperienza in Italia abbia lasciato una così buona impressione.

Tazlima
11-29-2018, 11:41 PM
:)

Essendo qui, lei e ovviamente un scrittore/trice. Studia letteratura or qualcosa di simile? Che cosa scriva? E in quale lingua!? Qualche volta tradurro qualcosina da Italiano a Inglese, ma come si puo vedere, non ho la scioltezza in Italiano per andare nello direzione opposto.

Io scrivo fantasie e... non sono sicura cosa si chimano in Italiano.. "Picture books" - libri illustrati per i bambini piccoli? Google dice che si chiamano semplicimente "libri illustrati," ma libri per bambini piu vecchi possono anche essere illustrati e Google non e essattamente infallabile.

Tazlima
11-30-2018, 12:16 AM
Lol, si puo ignorare quelle domande di che cosa scriva. Ho visto che hai gia detto tutto quello nell'altro ...com'e si dice "thread" in Italiano?

Comunque, bienvenuto al Absolute Write! C'e tantissimo buon informazione qui, e scrittori di tutta eta e di dappertutto. E favoloso.

Yasia
11-30-2018, 12:48 AM
Grazie per il benvenuto!
è esattamente il tipo di community che stavo cercando quindi spero in bene.
Comunque non credo che ci sia una traduzione diretta di thread, credo che nei forum italiani usiamo il termine discussioni.