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DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 08:54 AM
I am writting a novel and in a part they're ordering wine. Since i am too young to drink. I know nothing of wine. SO what is a good wine? and what is one of the best wines money can buy? Does anyone know? thank you. Please comment

alleycat
07-01-2010, 08:56 AM
Are the having the wine by itself, or with a meal? If it's with a meal, what are they having? If it's at a restaurant, what kind of restaurant? Some restaurants can serve a wine costing hundreds of dollars a bottle, other retaurants having a less expensive choice.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 08:57 AM
They're just ordering it to start off. they haven't ordered a meal yet

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:03 AM
ANd they are in a modern all natural five star resturant

friendlyhobo
07-01-2010, 09:04 AM
What is their price range?

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:05 AM
anything becuase the guy owns the resturant.

friendlyhobo
07-01-2010, 09:11 AM
ok. Here's the problem. There is too much wine in the world. What KIND of restaurant then? Different resturants will stock different prices ranges. Is the high-end price at this place $20 a bottle, or $200?
I think you need to get your google on.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:12 AM
I'd cheat; I'd go look at restaurant menus online; I'd search for awards like Michelin, and read menus and reviews.

Champagne works as both a starter wine, and a dessert wine, though you'd rarely have it for both.

There are obtainable champagnes like Bollinger Grande Année 2000; it's likely going to cost you around $200.00 in a restaurant.

alleycat
07-01-2010, 09:12 AM
Before dinner, maybe a French white wine.

Say, a Vincent Girardin Grand Cru.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:12 AM
I need to know whats a good wine and whats one of the best. Becuase what happens is the girl just asks the waiter for wine and when the waiter returns the snooty guy shes with thows a fit and says he wants blah blah blah but its has to be a every rich and good wine.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:15 AM
I need to know whats a good wine and whats one of the best. Becuase what happens is the girl just asks the waiter for wine and when the waiter returns the snooty guy shes with thows a fit and says he wants blah blah blah but its has to be a every rich and good wine.

If he does that in a major restaurant, he'll be escorted out, but you've said he's the owner.

Also; in a restaurant like that, it'd be a sommelier, a highly trained and very knowledgeable professional with expertise in wine and in pairing wine with food.

In high-end restaurants, you're dealing with professional artists, from the wait staff to the sous chefs and comites. It does not pay to screw with them, even if you are the owner.

Go watch a bunch of food shows on Hulu. It's research.

alleycat
07-01-2010, 09:18 AM
Another question, is this guy a real wine expert, or a poser? A poser might just ask for something relatively well known and expensive, like a Mouton Rothschild.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:18 AM
Okay i will. I just thought maybe someone had a quick answer seeing that this is the only scene in the book involving wine, and the resturant really never plays a part in the novel again.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:19 AM
No hes a expert.

alleycat
07-01-2010, 09:21 AM
A Girardin would still work, I think.

http://www.google.com/products?q=Vincent+Girardin&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=gyUsTOqlBcOAlAfMloGqCg&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=3&ved=0CDMQrQQwAg

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:23 AM
Thank you allycat. But what would be the super good wine?

friendlyhobo
07-01-2010, 09:24 AM
Even it's a small part, better to get it right. And then you also just get to learn. Learning is always fun. When you are of drinking age, you will be able to be oh so impressive.
"How do you know so much about wine?" They will say.
"Well, whilst researching my novel..."
Who doesn't want that to happen.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 09:27 AM
yeah you're right Friendlyhobo.

mgoblue101415
07-01-2010, 11:04 AM
Chateau Petrus will run you over $2000 a bottle. Although, depending on the year it could go up to over $7000. But I doubt this guy would take a bottle of Petrus out of his stock for just a date.

If the guy owns the restaurant and is just out on a date (the way you've portrayed it is that it is just a date and not a relationship) then I'd say he'd probably not get anything over $100. A Grenouilles averages between $50-$100. A Jordan Cabernet will run around $100. Check out the Napa Valley wineries. A lot of the NV wines are around $100. When he orders make sure he mentions a year, i.e. Grenouilles 2001. The year the grapes were harvested makes a huge difference in the price of a bottle.

The only problem I have with your scene being realistic... If this guy is a "snooty" guy, and he owns the restaurant then he's not going to even bother allowing the girl to order for herself. He'd ask for the bottle of wine.

A more realistic scene might be to have him order the wine. After she takes a sip have him ask her what she thinks and she gives some generic "it's good" or something else simplistic, then have him come back with a "good?" and go into the the wine description.

waylander
07-01-2010, 01:23 PM
How about a wine from Francis Ford Coppola's winery along with a comment of how he knows Mr Coppola?
http://www.franciscoppolawinery.com/

GeorgeK
07-01-2010, 02:27 PM
There are no French Wines, only french whines, for they are all American grapes.

A lot would depend upon the person, what they would order. It's not so much that this or that wine is really better as it happens to fit your mood better. I tend to like Australian shiraz's, Portugese tawny ports and when I could find it, white merlot (which is really more of a blush). Also true wine is a living system, populated by yeasts. The year will matter, and the season will matter. Unless someone is a vintner or a restauranteur, they won't know what's good now. They might know what was good last year, but by now there's a different generation of yeasts growing in that bottle you saved from 2 years ago.

There really aren't bad wines except ones that have been "fortified" by adding insane amounts of sugar. You can tell those by swirling it in the glass. If it sticks to the glass, don't bother drinking it...unless of course you like that, but then you would have ordered a soft drink.

GeorgeK
07-01-2010, 02:39 PM
If I was selecting a wine for a novice I'd probably go with a beaugulaise (that must be horribly mispelled (bozh-u-lay) a soft red reminiscent of grape juice which the novice will find appealingly familiar. A mimosa would be good too, the orange juice will cover the annual variances in the champagne. Champagne by itself is something to avoid. When it is good, it is very good, when it is bad it is very bad.

sheadakota
07-01-2010, 03:12 PM
Just a drive-by thought here as well- If the girl orders something substandard- wouldn't snooty guy/owner correct the order before the waiter brings it? And wouldn't the waiter-knowing the guy is the owner not bring something substandard?

I like pinot grigio (sp) myself before dinner- but then again if its an Italian restaurant maybe a nice Merlot?

shaldna
07-01-2010, 03:13 PM
I am writting a novel and in a part they're ordering wine. Since i am too young to drink. I know nothing of wine. SO what is a good wine? and what is one of the best wines money can buy? Does anyone know? thank you. Please comment


it depends.

what your eating, what your tastes are, what your budget is. and what the place stocks.

Bubastes
07-01-2010, 03:44 PM
What Medievalist and mgoblue said. If the guy owns the place and it's a high-end restaurant, he would have a sommelier. If he's a snooty guy, I'd consider taking the route that mgoblue suggested. And as others have pointed out, the wines in the restaurant will definitely depend on the kind of restaurant it is.

The wine world is so huge that trying to select a wine that fits into your story would take a lot more research. There are some wines that have snob appeal because of their long histories (e.g., Chateau Petrus, Chateau Lafite), wines people get just for the name even if they know nothing about wine (e.g., Dom Perignon, Cristal), cult wines that are extremely difficult to get because they're made in such small quantities (e.g. Screaming Eagle, Silver Oak), under the radar wines that only people "in the know" know about (e.g., smaller boutique wineries), etc. In other words, if you really want to dive deeply into this, the kind of wine the snooty guy orders can depend on the reasons why he's snooty (truly knowledgeable, poser, show-off, big spender, etc.).

Can you tell I'm overthinking this? ;)

DrZoidberg
07-01-2010, 03:53 PM
And don't worry saying this is the best or most exclusive wine in the world. At that level of wine, exaggeration is mandatory.

GeorgeK
07-01-2010, 04:13 PM
The nice thing about wine is at least it makes a damn good marinade. If you don't want to drink it, you can always soak your steak in it.

Kitty Pryde
07-01-2010, 05:40 PM
Fancy wine-probably go with something French. If it's a 'natural food' restaurant, go with something Biodynamic--that's just a word for a bunch of goofy rituals done to make the wine 'natural' and it is somewhat like being organic. It's awfully trendy in some places. Whole Foods website should point out some good ones, or google biodynamic wine.

You know what happens when you order a bottle of wine in a fancy (or semi-fancy) restaurant (besides the sommelier helping you out as mentioned before)? Waiter brings it out, shows it to whoever ordered it or whoever seems to be in charge of the table. They open it in front of you, pour a small amount in a glass for that person to taste, and give it over. You taste it, then you nod or otherwise signify your approval to the waiter, and he pours you and the other diners a full glass (which does not go up to the top of the wine glass :) )

Thus endeth Kitteh's intro to fancy boozin' for young writers.

I agree that the owner would not be a jerk to his own staff for no good reason. If he asked for one thing, and the waitress brought something else, cheaper, then he might be a jerk to her, but otherwise not. Say he asked for a Chateau Julien Merlot, and she brings out the cheaper Julian Winery Merlot, or some such thing like that.

GeorgeK
07-01-2010, 06:04 PM
oh yeah..for some reason, I don't know why,...in America, the waiter will almost always give you the cork. For some reason people want to smell the cork. Really all you want to do is look at the label and make sure that what you ordered is the same thing on the cork. See that they match. Most of the good vintners will label the corks as well as the bottles so that an unscrupulous bartender can't recork the wrong vintage with the different wine.

shaldna
07-01-2010, 06:26 PM
bear in mind too, that one persons idea of a good wine is not the same as someone elses.

I love south african wine, it's very clean and uncomplicated. My mum hates it, she thinks they are all sour and flat. so it's a matter of personal taste as much as anything else.

You could have the most expensive, exclusive wine in the world, but to you it might still taste like wee.

For humour I would have her try to oder a bottle of Lambrini.

GeorgeK
07-01-2010, 06:37 PM
You could have the most expensive, exclusive wine in the world, but to you it might still taste like wee.
.

very and often true

Bubastes
07-01-2010, 06:39 PM
I've been thinking some more about this. To show the snootiness of the guy, have you considered approaching this from a different angle? The first thing I thought of was how many people are intimidated by wine and why this is so. A lot of times, it's because they're dealing with a wine person with a condescending attitude.

Have you ever met anyone who tried to make you feel stupid because you didn't know anything about a particular topic? What did that person do to make you feel that way? That might be another way to show that the guy is a jerk without having to know the details about wine itself since the specific wine isn't what's important here.

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 08:17 PM
The guy went to go get something from the kitchens when she asked. And its more of a specail occasion. Hes snooty becuase he knows hes better than everyone else. Becuase in truth he is "higher class" than the poeple he is at dinner with. But hes always corecting poeple and not saying sorry or admitting he was ever wrong. He doesn't do it on purpose that was just how he was riased. And i said this an all natural resturant. very bohemean(sorry if i spelt that wrong) with a mordern twist. Oh, and should i mention they have teenage children with them.

dirtsider
07-01-2010, 08:33 PM
Another thing to take into account - even though the guy is "snooty", he's also in the restaurant business. Which means, he's in the customer service business. He's essentially on show every time he walks out onto the floor, especially in one of the higher end restaurants. So he's not going to talk down to people in a manner where they're going to take offense at it. If the waitress brings an inferior wine to a table, he's most likely going to take the waitress aside and talk to her, not dress her down on the floor.

As for the MC, chances are that he's not going to say "oh, that's an inferior wine" because that'll make ~him~ look bad. As in, he's selling an inferior wine. And he doesn't want to insult a customer by saying her taste in wine is terrible. A more likely scenario would be him saying, "oh that's a nice wine but I think you'll like this one better."

DaughterOfAthena=)
07-01-2010, 08:43 PM
He doesn't yell across the floor. and they do have a private table. But he does whine and ask, "Is that blah blah?" And the waiter says, "no its the blah blah."
Then Theres a puase were the MC looks at the waiters face and she thinks he looks almost scared like he made a stupid mistake. Charles-the snooty guy-goes almost beat red becuase it is a good wine but not good enough. You know hes embarassed. And then semds him for the "right" wine.
Later he ends up fireing him.

Bubastes
07-01-2010, 08:59 PM
He doesn't yell across the floor. and they do have a private table. But he does whine and ask, "Is that blah blah?" And the waiter says, "no its the blah blah."
Then Theres a puase were the MC looks at the waiters face and she thinks he looks almost scared like he made a stupid mistake. Charles-the snooty guy-goes almost beat red becuase it is a good wine but not good enough. You know hes embarassed. And then semds him for the "right" wine.
Later he ends up fireing him.

This doesn't quite ring true for me because there's really no one "right" wine for a given dish or situation. I have a hard time envisioning where a particular wine choice would be an outright mistake, I guess. Plus, as Medievalist pointed out, the sommelier is the wine expert and usually knows more about wine than the restaurant owner (that's why the owner hires a sommelier).

I guess I'm not understanding the context of this whole scene or something.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:03 PM
The nice thing about wine is at least it makes a damn good marinade. If you don't want to drink it, you can always soak your steak in it.

Or make vinegar; I write for a couple of wine blogs, one of which is targeted towards budget wines, and I've made vinegar three times.

Two , or maybe three times, I've donated wine to the cthonic forces.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:07 PM
oh yeah..for some reason, I don't know why,...in America, the waiter will almost always give you the cork. For some reason people want to smell the cork. Really all you want to do is look at the label and make sure that what you ordered is the same thing on the cork. See that they match. Most of the good vintners will label the corks as well as the bottles so that an unscrupulous bartender can't recork the wrong vintage with the different wine.

It's because Old World wines will sometimes have storage problems, and develop a yeast/fungus problem. And there's the visual inspection thing--you don't want a dry cork.

Bubastes
07-01-2010, 09:09 PM
It's because Old World wines will sometimes have storage problems, and develop a yeast/fungus problem. And there's the visual inspection thing--you don't want a dry cork.

Yup. You also don't want the wine to reach the top of the cork, which would indicate that air got to the wine.

I wish more wineries would do screw-tops, but that's me and my quirks talking.

mtrenteseau
07-01-2010, 09:26 PM
How about a wine from Francis Ford Coppola's winery along with a comment of how he knows Mr Coppola?
http://www.franciscoppolawinery.com/

I really like the Director's Cut collection. Not only is the wine excellent, but the label is designed like a zoetrope strip snaked around the bottle. The row of figures represent frames in an animation - presumably you could soak one off, put it in a zoetrope, and watch the little two-second display repeating over and over.

Wine Spectator has a good web site, but I think a lot of content is subscription-only. But you might find a list of restaurants that have won their awards for having good wine cellars.

I set a dinner party scene at the 21 Club - their banquet menu and wine list are available online (www.21club.com (http://www.21club.com)), so I was able to design a meal exactly as one could have if they had planned it in real life.

(For food, keep in mind that better restaurants change their menus seasonally. The schnitzel I had at 21 last September isn't available in July, for example.)

mtrenteseau
07-01-2010, 09:34 PM
oh yeah..for some reason, I don't know why,...in America, the waiter will almost always give you the cork. For some reason people want to smell the cork. Really all you want to do is look at the label and make sure that what you ordered is the same thing on the cork. See that they match. Most of the good vintners will label the corks as well as the bottles so that an unscrupulous bartender can't recork the wrong vintage with the different wine.

You don't smell the cork. You're supposed to look at it to make sure that it's damp on one and, indicating that the bottle was stored on its side and the airtight seal was preserved.

The formal procedure for presenting a bottle of wine is as follows:

The bottle is presented to the person who ordered it, usually the host. They confirm that the label matches what they ordered.
The foil over the cork is removed with a small knife. They cut along the lip of the bottle to remove the circular top, then pull the rest off.
A small amount is poured into the glass of the person approving the wine. They'll swish it around and take a sip. The purpose isn't to give an opinion on the quality of the wine overall, just that it isn't corked (full of bits of broken cork), cloudy, or spoiled.
After this third approval, the wine is poured for the ladies at the table and then the gentlemen.
If a second bottle of the same thing is opened, it's done tableside but without the approval process - one assumes that it came from the same place as the last one.

If the owner of a restaurant orders a wine, he would assume that he has exactly that wine in stock. If the sommelier brings something else, I'd have to wonder what happened to the bottle that was ordered. Was it broken? Stolen? Served by mistake (or deliberately) to someone who ordered a cheaper wine?

Wine lists usually have bin numbers; even a restaurant with cavernous wie cellars and lengthy lists should be able to find exactly what was ordered immediately.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:39 PM
I wish more wineries would do screw-tops, but that's me and my quirks talking.

Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa have lots of even top tier wines with screw caps/ Stelvin cap.

And one of my very favorite Washington state wineries, Pacific Rim, is all screw cap.

dirtsider
07-01-2010, 09:39 PM
I agree with Medievalist - if the waiter is the sommlier whose job it is to make wine decisions, Charles would be an idiot to tell him off, let alone fire him, simply for bringing a bottle of wine that a customer (the MC) ordered. That would imply that he thinks the MC's an idiot. He's more likely to suggest the other wine because he thinks she'll like it. That way he still looks snooty but the MC can't complain that he insulted her taste in wines.

Even if they're at a private table, Charles would not tell off the waiter in front of customers (meaning the MC and her group). It still makes him look bad. Charles would pride himself on hiring the best people in the first place. If he keeps firing people simply because ~he's~ a snob and a jerk, he's not going to get the best people.

Medievalist
07-01-2010, 09:40 PM
Wine lists usually have bin numbers; even a restaurant with cavernous wie cellars and lengthy lists should be able to find exactly what was ordered immediately.

If this is a date, I'd expect the owner to have issued instructions--about the private table, the menu and the wine, all in advance.

mgoblue101415
07-01-2010, 10:08 PM
The guy went to go get something from the kitchens when she asked. And its more of a specail occasion. Hes snooty becuase he knows hes better than everyone else. Becuase in truth he is "higher class" than the poeple he is at dinner with. But hes always corecting poeple and not saying sorry or admitting he was ever wrong. He doesn't do it on purpose that was just how he was riased. And i said this an all natural resturant. very bohemean(sorry if i spelt that wrong) with a mordern twist. Oh, and should i mention they have teenage children with them.


Again, the problem with this is that if the guy owns the place, he more than likely would have told someone what wine he wanted. Drink orders would have been asked of the kids, but the adults would have been told that snooty guy has already taken care of that.

Your better bet would be to have him show his wine snootiness after the bottle arrives.

EDIT: *Note to self* Read all posts before posting.

So, um, yeah... What Medievalist said.

hammerklavier
07-01-2010, 11:44 PM
Another thing that would make sense is if the sommlier talks the girl in the the really expensive stuff, and when he brings it, the owner (who was absent when the wine was ordered) throws a fit and sends it back requesting something that costs no more than $100. Many restaurant owners are pretty cheap, afterall.

backslashbaby
07-01-2010, 11:50 PM
There are enough similarities in names for the waitor to have made a mistake. I'm trying to think of a good winery that does both white and red bordeaux, for instance. That could be a simple mistake that an owner could fume about.

I've worked at a couple of places that sound like your fictional restaurant. Too small for sommeliers, waitors are supposed to be experts, have to get the wine themselves, etc. I had one owner who would dress anybody down, on the spot, no doubt in anyone's mind ;)

I opened a very expensive demi bottle once and spilled a drop (you don't get many demi orders, and the cork is still large -- harder to open than I thought). Dear lord, you should've seen the owner.

If he weren't the owner, I'd have yoyr snooty guy try to say the wine was off. That happened twice where I worked with $700+ bottles of wine. Right! Off. Cos if you send back a bottle that costs that much, apparently you're really cool...

backslashbaby
07-02-2010, 12:22 AM
Here is a good place to search for a mistake you could use.

One example:

This wine
Château Lafleur Pomerol, 2002 $850.00
http://www.wine-searcher.com/find/lafleur+pomerol+bordeaux+france/2002/usa/-/a/-/33774
http://www.hdhwine.com/retail-wine-detail/oto-lot/301

confused with this one
Lafleur, (Pomerol) Magnum, 2006, 2006 $2495
http://www.wine-searcher.com/find/lafleur+pomerol+bordeaux+france/2006/usa/-/a/-/33774
http://www.sherry-lehmann.com/show_product?product_id=6520

pilot27407
07-02-2010, 12:22 AM
Reputedly, French wines are the best, definitely the most expensive. Italians and Germans are close. What your characters would drink depends on what they’d eat. Google wines and you’ll have hundreds of choices (some tell you what the taste like, what food they’re recommended with, even prices).

StephanieFox
07-02-2010, 02:10 AM
There are three things to consider; the vineyard, the style of wine and the year. The question you are asking is like asking us to tell you what's the best painting in the world or the best food in the world. A lot of it depends on what you like. But, when the wine is ordered, your character will have to include the three things I've mentioned, especially if they want to be snooty.

I'd like to suggest that your character talk a little about the wine, instead of you worrying about what's good or not. There are so many wines that you could actually make one up.

"I hope you don't mind that I've ordered the wine for us. My restaurant has an extensive wine list – one of the best in the country. They have a 1993 Chateau Vous l' Heure Bleue (Note: this is totally made up by me – it doesn't exist ) which I've not had time to try, but is considered one of the best French wines of the decade. Ah – here it comes. I'll let you decide what you think."

Also, in general, red wines go with meat and white with chicken and fish, but that's not always true. Lighter tasting wines go with lighter and more delicate foods, and heavier or more flavorful wines go with stronger tasting foods. That's why you'd drink a Chianti with red sauce and pasta or BBQ.

There are also wines that people drink in the summer and wines they drink in the winter. (Think warming vs refreshing.)

Even people who drink wine are not wine experts. They find a wine they like and stick with it or they take the advice of the wine expert in the store or at the restaurant.

The high end European wines have (had) a reputation for quality, but there are a lot of low end wines from there, too. New wine growing regions include Chile, S. Africa, Argentina, the American Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington for reds, N. California for both red and white wines,) and there are new places coming up with good wines all the time.

Note: Someone above make a smary comment about all French wines actually being American. That only kinda true. There was a disease that swept through the vineyards are France in the 1960s (I think) the and to save the vines, French vines were grafted on American roots, which were resistant to the disease, thus saving the French wine industry. The comment was funny, but I felt you needed an explanation of what was meant.


However, here's a link to a big deal wine mag, and that might be able to steer you to what you want.

http://top100.winespectator.com/wine-10-08.html

Hope this helps.

Medievalist
07-02-2010, 02:36 AM
Reputedly, French wines are the best, definitely the most expensive. Italians and Germans are close. What your characters would drink depends on what they’d eat. Google wines and you’ll have hundreds of choices (some tell you what the taste like, what food they’re recommended with, even prices).

Meh.

Read about the "judgment of Paris (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/05/25/WINE.TMP)."

Medievalist
07-02-2010, 02:39 AM
In defense of Washington wines, the top pick by Wine Spectator for 2009 was a Washington Cabernet Sauvignon (http://top100.winespectator.com/wineOfTheYear-2009.html).

So there!

Bubastes
07-02-2010, 02:51 AM
In defense of Washington wines, the top pick by Wine Spectator for 2009 was a Washington Cabernet Sauvignon (http://top100.winespectator.com/wineOfTheYear-2009.html).

So there!

I really like wines from Washington and Oregon. Oregon has fabulous pinot noirs, and one of my favorite cabernets (Quilceda Creek) is from Washington.

Bubastes
07-02-2010, 02:55 AM
Reputedly, French wines are the best, definitely the most expensive. Italians and Germans are close. What your characters would drink depends on what they’d eat. Google wines and you’ll have hundreds of choices (some tell you what the taste like, what food they’re recommended with, even prices).

Depends on the kind of wine you're talking about. Germany, for instance, is known for rieslings, but not for red wines. I wouldn't necessarily call French wines "the best," just different. There are so many countries making high quality wines now that it's easy to get a good bottle without spending a lot.

mgoblue101415
07-02-2010, 02:56 AM
Actually right now I'm hooked on Australian wines. Specifically the Swan Valley region. And I don't like red wines but I will actually drink a Shiraz occasionally.

ElsaM
07-04-2010, 03:01 PM
Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa have lots of even top tier wines with screw caps/ Stelvin cap.

And one of my very favorite Washington state wineries, Pacific Rim, is all screw cap.

Oh yeah, I'm surprised these days if I buy a wine and it comes with a cork. Of course, I only tend to buy Australian and New Zealand and I rarely exceed the $25 dollar mark. A few years ago we went wine tasting in the Yarra valley and came across a wine maker who was having to sell one of their top vintages at a fraction of the normal price because they'd worked out around a quarter of the bottles had corked. And they could only sell it from the cellar door with a warning sign. They told us they were never using corks again because they lost so much money.

We, of course, got a fantastic bargain on a really enjoyable wine.

Rowan
07-07-2010, 03:46 AM
I am writting a novel and in a part they're ordering wine. Since i am too young to drink. I know nothing of wine. SO what is a good wine? and what is one of the best wines money can buy? Does anyone know? thank you. Please comment

I'd start with a Bordeaux. :) He can easily argue the vintage--Chateau Haut-Brion is a good one.

These are generally accepted as the top producers (Bordeaux):

Château Lafite-Rothschild (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Lafite_Rothschild)
Château Margaux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Margaux)
Château Latour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Latour)
Château Haut-Brion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Haut-Brion)
Château Mouton-Rothschild (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Mouton_Rothschild)
Towards bottom of this page--"the great vintages". You could have him ask for a particular one and have them deliver the wrong vintage. ;)
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/news/the-best-ever-experts-hail-2005-vintage-as-a-bordeaux-to-die-for-473252.html

CHEERS!

Medievalist
07-07-2010, 03:53 AM
I really like wines from Washington and Oregon. Oregon has fabulous pinot noirs, and one of my favorite cabernets (Quilceda Creek) is from Washington.

I'm having an obscene amount of fun with Washington and Oregon wines (and beers!) and the sudden affordable availability of South American, Australian, New Zeanland wines.

Loving the Australian Cabernet Sauvignons, and Shiraz, and the New Zealand Savignon Blancs.

mtrenteseau
07-08-2010, 07:20 AM
I'd start with a Bordeaux. :) He can easily argue the vintage--Chateau Haut-Brion is a good one.


These are generally accepted as the top producers (Bordeaux):

Château Lafite-Rothschild (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Lafite_Rothschild)
Château Margaux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Margaux)
Château Latour (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Latour)
Château Haut-Brion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Haut-Brion)
Château Mouton-Rothschild (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_Mouton_Rothschild)
Towards bottom of this page--"the great vintages". You could have him ask for a particular one and have them deliver the wrong vintage. ;)
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/news/the-best-ever-experts-hail-2005-vintage-as-a-bordeaux-to-die-for-473252.html

CHEERS!


Excellent example. An '82 is considered a treasure for any of these - an '83 could be a disappointment. (And if one of the plot points is that the person is angered because the wrong thing was delivered, an '82 also works because it's the best Bordeaux vintage that a high-end restaurant would be likely to have in any quantity. Something that's rare and potentially sold out doesn't fit the scene.)

Another possibility is the idea of a "second label." The five wines mentioned above are called "First Growths." They are the best of the best by a classification system created in 1855. Lower-ranked wines are called "second growths," "third growths," etc. Mouton went from a second growth to a first growth, the only change in the rankings ever.

A "second label" is a deliberately inferior brand sold by a respected winery. It might contain leftovers, or wines that somehow didn't come out tasting like what they wanted for the main brand. They might purchase grapes from other sources to increase production volume and create a consistent taste.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_wine

The labels of Chateaux Margaux and Pavilion Rouge de Chateau Margaux are similar enough that an uninformed person might mistake them.