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boron
06-14-2010, 06:46 PM
What are some widely popular fish and other seafood in American diet? Something what many Americans eat regularly.

I know for anchovies, shrimps, tuna, mackerel.

I'm writing an article about nutrition facts of certain foods...

WriteKnight
06-14-2010, 06:50 PM
Salmon, and catfish come to mind. Mostly because I enjoy them both. Freshwater fish like Bass of course, caught for the sport of it, but eaten with pleasure. Trout as well.

Depending on location, CRABS are a huge part of the coastal diet. Blue crabs, softshell crabs. Oysters and clams - again, depending on location, and oil slicks.

But I grew up on the Texas gulf coast, so flounder, crab, shrimp and oysters were always available. Someone in Kansas might have a different feeling about food. New England of course, has lobsters... really it's a big country and fish/seafood is location dependent.

stormie
06-14-2010, 06:53 PM
Fluke (also known as flounder)

Gretad08
06-14-2010, 07:03 PM
Tuna

Alpha Echo
06-14-2010, 07:05 PM
salmon, tuna, flounder, and yes, crabs are HUGE (and delicious!), shrimp, tilapea, sword fish..

ETA: I just really love fish.

Cranky
06-14-2010, 07:05 PM
Tilapia, walleye and cod, too.

CaroGirl
06-14-2010, 07:17 PM
Halibut.

PGaritas
06-14-2010, 07:19 PM
swordfish

Maryn
06-14-2010, 07:22 PM
We are not on an ocean, so fish other than local catches are expensive.

Nevertheless, fresh fish is readily obtainable and we eat it once or twice a week. Favorites include yellowfin tuna, scallops (which aren't really fish, of course), salmon of multiple kinds, and swordfish. Less often, we have catfish, tilapia, mahi-mahi, halibut, or sole. Once in a great while, it's shrimp (rarely, for Mr. Maryn's health reasons).

The store where I shop has other fish in stock, but I don't buy them.

I also buy canned clams, tuna, crab, and tiny shrimp (all for me!), and frozen salmon and tilapia.

Maryn, who smells like fish

Alpha Echo
06-14-2010, 07:25 PM
We catch our fish, so also we've had king mackeral, red snapper, grouper, croaker, blue fish, rock fish....

cbenoi1
06-14-2010, 08:09 PM
> Something what many Americans eat regularly.

All the species named above, soaked in a beer batter and deep fried. And don't forget the A1 sauce and ketsup.

-cb

WriteKnight
06-14-2010, 08:41 PM
Oh the ubiquitous "Sea Food Platter" - take anything from the ocean, deep fry it and pour it on a huge plate making up more than 3000 calories... yeah. Most 'family restaraunts' will serve such an abomination. (Spare the catsup pass me the tartar sauce... mmmmmmmm)

Modern transport makes just about any seafood available anywhere - but of course the farther inland, the more expensive. And frozen anything is not quite as good as fresh caught.

Honestly, I've traveled ALL over the US and it's surprising how localized the cuisine can be in regards to fish. Growing up on the Gulf Coast, I almost never ate salmon. Here in NorCal I LOVE it. Almost never got Lobster when I was a kid, but I worked in Massachusetts for several months, and became addicted to it. Red Snapper on the Gulf, especially BLACKENED is a real treat.

The Great Lakes region has their own freshwater cuisine.

Chris P
06-14-2010, 08:56 PM
For the most part, tuna (especially canned) and salmon are pretty common. Tilapia has gotten popular lately, and cod seems to be resurging (yay! I love cod!). You can also get orange roughy and flounder almost anywhere.

Catfish can be found in most places, but is very popular in the South. There are some regional differences, such as Lake Superior whitefish in the Great Lakes area, lobster and crab are quite popular in the Northeast (and elsewhere, it's just something harder to get) and the Pacific Northwest has other species that are popular there.

boron
06-14-2010, 09:06 PM
Fish, that may be high in mercury (especially those caught in the Gulf of Mexico) and should be avoided by children and pregnant women:

- king mackerel, swordfish, shark, tilefish (source: FDA (http://www.fda.gov/food/foodsafety/product-specificinformation/seafood/foodbornepathogenscontaminants/methylmercury/ucm115644.htm))

Shrimps are high in cholesterol, but they are mainly saturated fats, rather than cholesterol that raises bad blood cholesterol.

A food high in saturated fats and low in cholesterol is much worse for the heart and vessels than a food high in cholesterol and low in saturated fats.

mscelina
06-14-2010, 09:12 PM
Trout is huge in the south; so is catfish. Salmon, swordfish, tuna, mahi mahi are big on the southern coast. Crawfish, oysters, crabs, shrimp are huge in the Mississippi delta area. Northeast--cod, lobsters, crabs, flounder, clams.

johnnysannie
06-14-2010, 09:16 PM
A lot of regional variances in what fish Americans eat.

We eat a lot of salmon (both frozen filets and canned), some canned tuna, catfish, tilipia, and some whiting.

Fresh caught, we like bass, trout, crappie, blue gill, and spoonbill.

I grew up eating carp and gar because we lived on a major river; some Americans consider these "trash fish" but they are also big in Europe. Both are actually tasty.

Don Allen
06-14-2010, 09:23 PM
Actually you can take anchovies off the menu, sales are so far down they just announce the closure of the last anchovy plant in America, google it to learn more.

Irysangel
06-14-2010, 09:27 PM
You also need to verify how far inland you are to determine the diet. Like one of the posters above mentioned, it's really hard to get fresh anything when you're not close to the coast. I live in North Texas, and we mostly see salmon, tuna, catfish and tilapia. The more exotic brands we usually don't see unless you go to a specialty market.

SarahNFisk
06-14-2010, 09:37 PM
My sister and I grew up on coasts (my dad is in the Coast Guard) and ate A LOT of fish our whole lives.

In Texas we ate mostly flounder (that we caught ourselves). We spent every summer in southern Arkansas, where the only fish I saw on any menu was catfish. While living in the keys, our fish-of-choice was Mahi-Mahi (also called dolphin - especially around tourists, to freak them out), but it's a little more expensive and harder to catch (we still did, though). It's my favorite fish. Tilapia is great when you're on a diet and it tastes more-or-less like whatever you cook it in (I like lemon juice, a dab of butter and garlic).

I've only recently started eating salmon, but the Icelandic volcano has slowed down the supply, at least on the East coast.

I can't stand cod and I've discovered that most people who say they "don't like fish" have only ever had either cod or whitefish.

With all that being said, I prefer crab more than any fish :-)

PeterL
06-14-2010, 09:54 PM
It depends on where one is. In New England the preferred fish would be salmon, haddock, and cod. People in other areas eat what they can get.

boron
06-14-2010, 09:54 PM
Actually you can take anchovies off the menu, sales are so far down they just announce the closure of the last anchovy plant in America, google it to learn more.

Yes, I've just said it from the head - they are actually more popular in Europe, I think.

Most fish in US is eaten fresh? What about canned fish? Here in Europe, canned sardines or canned tuna are popular.

Also, in general, are people aware where the fish they eat are from? Are people aware which fish come from Mexico gulf, for example?

johnnysannie
06-14-2010, 10:52 PM
Yes, I've just said it from the head - they are actually more popular in Europe, I think.

Most fish in US is eaten fresh? What about canned fish? Here in Europe, canned sardines or canned tuna are popular.

Also, in general, are people aware where the fish they eat are from? Are people aware which fish come from Mexico gulf, for example?

Canned: tuna, salmon, sardines (also fish steaks in similar tins).

I am usually aware of where the fish I eat comes from - whether we catch it or buy it at the supermarket. I don't think you can tell Gulf of Mexico, though, just whether or not it's USA or another country.

These days, fish from the Gulf are in short supply :(

Shadow_Ferret
06-14-2010, 11:04 PM
I know for anchovies, shrimps, tuna, mackerel.


I have NEVER had anchovies. Can't say I've ever had macherel.

But tuna, salmon, trout, perch, bluegill, smelt, cod, haddock are popular. Tilapia, in recent hears, has become very popular.

Chris P
06-14-2010, 11:17 PM
Yes, I've just said it from the head - they are actually more popular in Europe, I think.

Most fish in US is eaten fresh? What about canned fish? Here in Europe, canned sardines or canned tuna are popular.

Also, in general, are people aware where the fish they eat are from? Are people aware which fish come from Mexico gulf, for example?

I buy most of my fish frozen. And for the most part, I don't know where it comes from. I grew up 1000 miles from any coast and it just wasn't something we thought about. I wasn't even sure always which fish were freshwater and which were salt, except for the obvious ones like ocean perch, tuna or catfish. I tried to get more informed a few years ago when there was an ocean conservation campaign, but I never kept up with it.

EDIT: and anchovies are bleurgh! I've only seen people eat them on a bet and usually drunk.

RJK
06-14-2010, 11:21 PM
For the ever-popular Friday-night fish-fry, Haddock and sometimes, cod. Salmon steaks or cutlets, swordfish steaks are great. I didn't see clams or oysters, but they're popular as appetizers. Shrimp in any form. Tilapia is becoming popular. Occasionally, catfish or other bottom feeders. Lobsters when we can afford them. Tuna steaks, and canned tuna for tuna salad sandwiches.

WriteKnight
06-14-2010, 11:27 PM
Uh, the data on the FDA link is really old. Sometimes THIRTY YEARS OLD, or in some cases only a decade.

boron
06-14-2010, 11:53 PM
Uh, the data on the FDA link is really old. Sometimes THIRTY YEARS OLD, or in some cases only a decade.

Average levels of mercury has probably changed, but they are likely the same fish that accumulate mercury:


Nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of methylmercury. However, larger fish that have lived longer have the highest levels of methylmercury because they've had more time to accumulate it. These large fish (swordfish, shark, king mackerel and tilefish) pose the greatest risk.

Source: EPA.gov (http://www.epa.gov/fishadvisories/advice/), last update, March 2010

mgoblue101415
06-15-2010, 12:50 AM
Yes, I've just said it from the head - they are actually more popular in Europe, I think.

Most fish in US is eaten fresh? What about canned fish? Here in Europe, canned sardines or canned tuna are popular.

Also, in general, are people aware where the fish they eat are from? Are people aware which fish come from Mexico gulf, for example?




Canned tuna is very popular in the US. Herring is another that is popular out of the can, as is pickled herring.


I have absolutely no idea where my fish comes from. I live in the heart of the Midwest so basically the fish I eat is not fresh, although since I don't like fish I really only eat cod or tilapia. Occasionally on the menus it will mention "Atlantic Cod" or "Pacific Salmon" but most of the time there is no mention of where the fish is from. Now, I do eat a lot of seafood and it's the same way... No origin listed. Well, unless it mentions Alaskan Snow Crab or Alaskan King Crab Legs or something.

StephanieFox
06-15-2010, 01:22 AM
I live in the center of the North American continent, 1,500 miles from the
Atlantic, Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico and ocean fish is expensive. Canned tuna and salmon and farm raised catfish isn't and farm raised tilipia are popular but shellfish – crab, shrimp, scallops, oysters, clams, etc are too pricey for me more than once or twice a year. (Clams, when you can find them fresh in the stores can get up to about $1 each.)

There are millions of people who live hundreds of miles from any ocean, despite what people on the coasts believe. Our local fish are freshwater fish – walleye and pike are popular and very good. We also get smelt in the spring from Lake Superior.

Herring (pickled) is eaten by specific populations; Swedes, Norwegians and grumpy old men. My husband, who is none of the above, loves his pickled herring anyway. I agree with the above writer who said than anchovies are not popular. They are eaten by a rare person on pizza, but it's hard to find anyone who will share that pizza with him. NO anchovies for your list.

It's becoming more and more common for restaurants and supermarkets to mention where the fish is from, but that's part of the 'green' marketing.

Shadow_Ferret
06-15-2010, 01:38 AM
Forgot about herring.


Most fish in US is eaten fresh? What about canned fish? Here in Europe, canned sardines or canned tuna are popular.

Also, in general, are people aware where the fish they eat are from? Are people aware which fish come from Mexico gulf, for example?

I tried canned salmon once. It was horrid.

And I don't really pay attention where my fish comes from. Most of the tilapia comes from China. Not sure about fresh water where it comes from. Trout farms?

Cyia
06-15-2010, 01:43 AM
I don't eat seafood, but from family eating habits, I'd say CATFISH for a fresh caught fish (especially if they catch it themselves) or TUNA for canned. For "fancy" fish, Mom used to eat flounder. Tilapia's easy to find and relatively cheap to buy.

backslashbaby
06-15-2010, 02:05 AM
My favorite fish is grouper or orange roughy. I do love catfish, though! We have festivals for them and get to see some bigger than large dogs. Usually named Bubba :D

I also love mussels. They aren't from around here. NC is home of Blue Crabs, which are probably the most perfect food ever :)

johnnysannie
06-15-2010, 05:30 PM
[QUOTE=Shadow_Ferret;5051028]Forgot about herring.


I tried canned salmon once. It was horrid.

QUOTE]

AU contraire! If you know what to do with canned salmon, it can be delicious. I grew up eating and now cooking a Depression era favorite (in my family at least) - salmon patties. Fancier folks call them salmon croquettes but I use canned salmon and they are delicious!

djf881
06-15-2010, 06:37 PM
Keep in mind that most of the United States is inland from the ocean, so fish are not a traditional part of the American diet in the same way they might be in Europe.

Also, you should check out the book "Eating Animals" by Jonathan Safran Foer, or some other resource about American agriculture and the subsidies and incentives related to modern farming. But the short version is that most animal protein in the American diet is beef, chicken and pork.

Seafood factors into regional cuisines; lobster and clams in New England, crabs around the Chesapeake, catfish in the South, salmon in the Pacific northwest.

But the only fish that really manages to be a nationwide food staple is canned tuna. And whatever's in a fast-food fish sandwich (cod or haddock, probably), although fish sandwiches sell slower than the burgers and the chicken.

Synovia
06-15-2010, 06:44 PM
Keep in mind that most of the United States is inland from the ocean, so fish are not a traditional part of the American diet in the same way they might be in Europe.

Geographically, yes, population wise, not so much. Most of the american population lives on the coastal states.


For those of us in the middle of the country, catfish is big.

sunandshadow
06-15-2010, 07:54 PM
Tuna is the only thing I've seen people regularly eat from a can. The rest is bought either frozen or fresh. 'Whitefish' (any of several fish), orange roughy, cod, trout, salmon, mahi mahi, and catfish (in southern restaurants) are what's mainly seen on menus; occasionally shark or swordfish. Fried clams, shrimp, and steamed crabs are also popular.

Cyia
06-15-2010, 08:01 PM
so fish are not a traditional part of the American diet in the same way they might be in Europe.


Not true at all. Fish is one of the most common foods served in most homes. Schools make it regularly. It's a generally cheap and abundant protein that lower income homes can buy without the budget strain of beef.

Fish sandwiches are one of the most common and permanent items on the menu of every fast food place I can think of, even Subway serves tuna. Fish tacos are becoming more and more popular.

Add in the families that observe Fish Fridays for the Catholic church and you've got a huge pool of people who eat fish on a regular basis.

WriteKnight
06-16-2010, 01:57 AM
Oh yeah, growing up in a big Catholic family, friday was always tuna casserole, or fish 'sticks' or catfish. Sometimes rainbow or speckled trout if a neighbor was lucky and generous... but yeah - mostly tuna and whatever 'white' fish is in the frozen patties and sticks.

Yesterday I ate a tuna-salad nestled inside a fresh avocado half for lunch. Then had a wonderful baked salmon fillet for dinner. I don't always eat a lot of fish, I kind of get on 'runs' where I'm in the mood for a while, then I forget about it for a while. Season and market price can influence that mood too.

Shadow_Ferret
06-16-2010, 02:00 AM
I tried canned salmon once. It was horrid.



AU contraire! If you know what to do with canned salmon, it can be delicious. I grew up eating and now cooking a Depression era favorite (in my family at least) - salmon patties. Fancier folks call them salmon croquettes but I use canned salmon and they are delicious!

I tried to eat it like tuna. Blech!

LoopyLinde
06-16-2010, 05:37 AM
The fish you eat is definitely regional. There may be anything available but the prices will be higher the farther from the source, more than most other foods, I think.

Except for canned tuna. Which is everywhere, and I would guess the most commonly eaten. Plus the fried white fish in fast food places. Don't know what that might be. Cod?

Here in the Pacific Northwest, salmon (Alaskan wild is what I like, many species), crab (King or Dungeoness the most available), halibut, red snapper, cod. Lots more. This area is seafood heaven. Clams and oysters and scallops, geoducks (pronounced gooeyduck) which are giant clams.

Canotila
06-16-2010, 08:19 AM
Another northwesterner here. We have a lot of fishermen in the family, and I live two blocks from salt water so we exclusively eat wild caught fish.

Right now we've got:

Trout
Steelhead
Salmon
Catfish
Halibut steaks
Tuna steaks

All in the freezer. You can go to the coast in WA and buy a whole tuna fish straight from the source, then take it home and can/freeze it. It's so much better than the store bought canned stuff.

Sometimes we eat dogfish too, but that's not so common in people's diets. It's considered a garbage fish and they don't freeze well, but prepared right they are delicious.

johnnysannie
06-16-2010, 03:14 PM
I tried to eat it like tuna. Blech!

Not so good that way, I agree.

shaldna
06-16-2010, 03:51 PM
catfish is popular in teh south.

shaldna
06-16-2010, 03:53 PM
I tried to eat it like tuna. Blech!


I HATE Salmon. It's up there with corn and cook carrots on my list of devil food.

Tuna is gorgeous though. A nice tuna steak with soy and ginger marinade on thread noodles and spring onions.

johnnysannie
06-16-2010, 05:30 PM
Add in the families that observe Fish Fridays for the Catholic church and you've got a huge pool of people who eat fish on a regular basis.

Just a brief FYI - fish on Fridays for American Catholics hasn't been required in decades - now it's only done during the Lenten season. Some of us still observe it - grew up with the tradition and still do it most Fridays (always in Lent).

Nivarion
06-17-2010, 05:58 AM
The ones that come to mind first are catfish and trout. Salmon, tuna, bass and tilapia are also common.

Catfish are everywhere in the south, and they are eaten a lot. :D I've got some good recipes for catfish if its relevant. Good eats there.

mimstrel
06-17-2010, 07:04 AM
Certain types of fish will be more common in the various regions. For instance, Halibut is really popular in Alaska (as was Salmon)... but nobody had catfish. At home in the midwest, catfish is popular but we never eat 'but, and most of the salmon we get is frozen Atlantic salmon - expensive and not nearly as good as fresh Alaska Sockeye salmon.

poetinahat
06-17-2010, 07:15 AM
Perch, especially out of the Great Lakes.

Scrod, especially in the east.


> Something what many Americans eat regularly.

All the species named above, soaked in a beer batter and deep fried. And don't forget the A1 sauce and ketsup.

-cb
I've never seen, nor heard of, anyone in America eating fish with A1 sauce; ketchup, maybe some do, but it would not be the rule. And it's either "ketchup" or "catsup". I take it you don't think highly of American cuisine.

Monkey
06-17-2010, 07:48 AM
I'm from the south. I like catfish with ketchup. :tongue

I wouldn't eat it with A1 sauce, though. Even I have standards.

Actually, other than catfish and crawdads (which I no longer have a taste for), I haven't eaten much seafood (or, in my case, lakefood), even though I live near the coast. I have found that I like Tilapia and salmon if cooked with a lot of lemon. I also like shrimp and crab, but only from the nicer restaurants, prepared just so. :D

Shark is good, but I've only had it fresh--a friend of mine is a shark fisherman--and it's not as widely available.

So, from the prospective of someone not that into seafood, who only eats what's widely available (with the exception of shark), I'd say
Tuna
Tilapia
Catfish
Salmon
Shrimp and
Crab.

:)

sunandshadow
06-17-2010, 10:50 AM
A1 is so strong, if you put it on fish you wouldn't be able to taste the fish at all. Unless that's the point? lol. Around here fish is eaten with lemon, ketchup, tartar sauce, or cocktail sauce. It's also sometimes cooked in a citrus juice or served in a cream sauce, commonly with pasta.

WriteKnight
06-17-2010, 11:51 PM
Fettuccine Alfredo with shrimp.....hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

boron
06-18-2010, 12:42 PM
What does chinook mean?

Wild Alaska salmon, chinook

Canotila
06-18-2010, 03:17 PM
What does chinook mean?

Wild Alaska salmon, chinook

Chinook is a species of salmon, and the name of a pacific northwestern tribe.

boron
06-18-2010, 03:26 PM
Chinook is a species of salmon, and the name of a pacific northwestern tribe.

OK, so Chinook being a city in Montana doesn't prevent salmons swimming around Alaska to be called chinook, I guess...Also: salmon, chinook, or Chinook?

shaldna
06-18-2010, 04:16 PM
what's A1 sauce?

SouthernFriedJulie
06-18-2010, 06:25 PM
Didn't see the answer to the canned salmon question: What do you do with it?

Down South we mix it with an egg or two, some seasonings (salt, pepper mostly), cracker crumbs to make a thick mess. Form into patties, fry until golden brown and server over buttery rice.

Growing up in NC provided plenty of choices in seafood. Crabs, mussels, freshwater - my favorite is catfish. Cut filet's into nuggets, batter, and deep fry. Use healthy oil, please. (Hey, deep frying is THE way to enjoy catfish)

I believe the fish in most fast food sandwiches is Alaska White. [[isn't that the same as pollock?]] That's what I have been told at each joint I asked.

Canotila
06-18-2010, 06:28 PM
It's lowercase for the fish. Uppercase for the people or the city.

boron
06-18-2010, 06:48 PM
...my favorite is catfish. Cut filet's into nuggets, batter, and deep fry. Use healthy oil, please. (Hey, deep frying is THE way to enjoy catfish)...

Catfish, wild (also salmon, trout, herring) is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, which, if eaten regularly (and instead of red meat), reduce risk of chronic heart disease. When deep fried, both oil used and omega-3 fats in fish may be partially converted in trans-fats, which may be harmful for heart.

SarahNFisk
06-18-2010, 07:03 PM
[QUOTE=Shadow_Ferret;5051028]Forgot about herring.


I tried canned salmon once. It was horrid.

QUOTE]

AU contraire! If you know what to do with canned salmon, it can be delicious. I grew up eating and now cooking a Depression era favorite (in my family at least) - salmon patties. Fancier folks call them salmon croquettes but I use canned salmon and they are delicious!

Oh yeah, I love the salmon patties. Tasty!

cbenoi1
06-18-2010, 07:58 PM
> I've never seen, nor heard of, anyone in America eating fish with A1 sauce;

My bad. Someone mentionned tartar sauce, which would be closer to what I've experienced in the UK (Fish & Chips).


> A1 is so strong, if you put it on fish you wouldn't be able
> to taste the fish at all. Unless that's the point?

You tell me. It's on every family-type restaurant table I've been to and I've seen people dump generous portions of the thing over their meals. *shivers*


> I take it you don't think highly of American cuisine.

I had superb dinings in various US cities, mind you. I've had seared swordfish and shark in San Diego, buttered golden trout with almonds in San Fran, shrimp jambalaya in Nawlins', and grilled lobster in Maine. To name a few. But in the land where popcorn shrimps, fried calamari, and fried fish-o-day make up the majority of the fish menus, I had to look hard to find good spots that offered something better.


-cb

SouthernFriedJulie
06-18-2010, 09:51 PM
Catfish, wild (also salmon, trout, herring) is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, which, if eaten regularly (and instead of red meat), reduce risk of chronic heart disease. When deep fried, both oil used and omega-3 fats in fish may be partially converted in trans-fats, which may be harmful for heart.

I'll die happy, then. :-)

I'd place bets on the smoking and the occasional drink taking me out first.

Shadow_Ferret
06-18-2010, 09:56 PM
what's A1 sauce?

OMG! You're so deprived! It's a wonderful Worcestershire-like steak sauce.

But I wouldnt' use it on fish. It would overwhelm the poor thing.

boron
06-18-2010, 10:16 PM
I'll die happy, then. :-)

I'd place bets on the smoking and the occasional drink taking me out first.

It was mainly my reply on the recommendation :"use healthy oil". Oils considered as healthy, those with unsaturated fatty acids (like olive oil), are WORSE for frying than a regular oil, since they become more unhealthy after heating than the regular oil does.

sunandshadow
06-19-2010, 01:10 AM
> I take it you don't think highly of American cuisine.

I had superb dinings in various US cities, mind you. I've had seared swordfish and shark in San Diego, buttered golden trout with almonds in San Fran, shrimp jambalaya in Nawlins', and grilled lobster in Maine. To name a few. But in the land where popcorn shrimps, fried calamari, and fried fish-o-day make up the majority of the fish menus, I had to look hard to find good spots that offered something better.


-cb
You have an odd definition of 'better', lol. I'd rather have fried cod, calamari, clams, or shrimp (especially coconut) any day than grilled lobster or shrimp jambalaya. Buttered trout is good but I'm puzzled by the almonds - almonds are supposed to go with sweet foods, and trout is not supposed to be sweet. I'd want lemon with buttered trout, optionally also breadcrumbs or parsley.

SouthernFriedJulie
06-19-2010, 05:16 AM
It was mainly my reply on the recommendation :"use healthy oil". Oils considered as healthy, those with unsaturated fatty acids (like olive oil), are WORSE for frying than a regular oil, since they become more unhealthy after heating than the regular oil does.

I'm really just teasing. Being a born and bred Southerner, I'm used to seeing everything fried. Still haven't gotten up the courage to try a fried candy bar. That just has to be bad for you.

For the past 12 years it's been mostly healthy foods here. Moved to NY and it's hard to get that artery clogging goodness of the South. [I'm kidding, kidding about the goodness] -- along with needing to cut out almost all oils.

Someone mentioned Friday fish frys. Here is Buffalo that is a popular tradition. I know it was said that avoiding red meat on Friday for the Catholic community isn't mandatory now. Buffalo has a huge Catholic community and you can smell the fish frys on almost every street. I find it a lovely tradition.

WriteKnight
06-19-2010, 04:45 PM
Fish Friday is still on the menu at most of the chain 'cafeterias' across america. Yeah, no longer required - it's still a tradition in a lot of communities.

As a native Texan, I can attest to 'all things fried' as a southern tradition. And some things ARE really nice fried. But much depends on the batter, and the oil. (If it ain't fried, it ain't food" is only partly a jest.

Still, BLACKENED seafood is also popular, especially Snapper and Redfish.. And BOILED shrimp was always a favorite of mine. I lived on Galveston bay, and could WALK to the shrimp boats -buy a couple of pounds and boil them up fresh... YES PLEASE!

Shadow_Ferret
06-19-2010, 05:06 PM
Someone mentioned Friday fish frys. Here is Buffalo that is a popular tradition. I know it was said that avoiding red meat on Friday for the Catholic community isn't mandatory now. Buffalo has a huge Catholic community and you can smell the fish frys on almost every street. I find it a lovely tradition.

Milwaukee is the same way. Fridays the town is filled with the wonderful aroma of fish frying from every restaurant and tavern.

johnnysannie
06-19-2010, 06:19 PM
Milwaukee is the same way. Fridays the town is filled with the wonderful aroma of fish frying from every restaurant and tavern.

That's because you must have a large percentage of Catholics; where I live those of us who like to honor the old tradition have to go fish - almost literally - on Fridays even during Lent!!!!!

SouthernFriedJulie
06-19-2010, 08:53 PM
Milwaukee is the same way. Fridays the town is filled with the wonderful aroma of fish frying from every restaurant and tavern.

I don't even know what kind of fish they use here! In Milwaukee do they use fish from Lake Michigan? I need to ask one of the bar owners here.

Bars, pizzerias, churches...I've never seen so many places frying fish outside of campsites down by the river back home.

jsh7777
06-21-2010, 12:13 AM
I've seen talapai on menu's more and more. It's a fresh water perch from central and south America I'm told.

Big difference in fresh and salt water fish in regards to vitamins, oils, etc.

I'm told that we also need to consider farm-raised as compared to 'wild'.

Here on the Gulf Coast most of us are avid seafood-eaters, especially shrimp, crab, redfish, speckled trout, flounder. Mouth watering. We are all holding our breath to see how far the BP spill is going to pollute and ruin.

boron
06-22-2010, 05:02 PM
I've seen talapai on menu's more and more. It's a fresh water perch from central and south America I'm told.

Big difference in fresh and salt water fish in regards to vitamins, oils, etc.

I'm told that we also need to consider farm-raised as compared to 'wild'.

Here on the Gulf Coast most of us are avid seafood-eaters, especially shrimp, crab, redfish, speckled trout, flounder. Mouth watering. We are all holding our breath to see how far the BP spill is going to pollute and ruin.

Regarding to health, fresh and saltwater fish differ mainly in amount of toxins. Not only oil, it's mercury, they say, in the Gulf of Mexico and big fish collect it. And some other toxins, manly in Caribbean area. I guess there's not so much toxins in saltwater around Alaska.

Farmed fish may have more saturated fats than wild fish, but this is not always the case.

It's a type of fish and where exactly (non/polluted water) it was caught that matters.

On Nutritiondata (http://nutritiondata.com) you have a lot of details (exact type of fats, vitamins...) about all main types of fish.

johnnysannie
06-22-2010, 05:10 PM
[QUOTE=SouthernFriedJulie;5062557]Didn't see the answer to the canned salmon question: What do you do with it?

Down South we mix it with an egg or two, some seasonings (salt, pepper mostly), cracker crumbs to make a thick mess. Form into patties, fry until golden brown and server over buttery rice.

QUOTE]

That's pretty much what we do with it; my Southern heritage must be showing.

Shadow_Ferret
06-22-2010, 05:36 PM
I don't even know what kind of fish they use here! In Milwaukee do they use fish from Lake Michigan? I need to ask one of the bar owners here.

Bars, pizzerias, churches...I've never seen so many places frying fish outside of campsites down by the river back home.

Honestly, I don't know if they use fish from Lake Michigan, but I wouldn't be surprised. One of the more popular fish for Fish Fry Friday is lake perch. They also serve walleye and pike, both freshwater fish also. But I think Atlantic cod is the most popular. Probably because its cheapest.