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Jorge A.
06-14-2010, 07:40 AM
If this has already been posted elsewhere than I applogize for being redundant. Anywho, this video is all about the end/future of publishing. have a looksee.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Weq_sHxghcg&feature=player_embedded

Ton Lew Lepsnaci
06-14-2010, 05:53 PM
Brilliant ;)

Libbie
06-14-2010, 05:58 PM
I haven't looked at the vid yet. My money's on "self-publishing on the interwebs," or on "e-publishing because in the year 2000 everybody will own an e-reader." Either way, I am enormously skeptical. People have been making dire and/or wild predictions about the end and future of publishing at least since the 1930s (which is the earliest recorded instance of publishing-prediction, if I recall correctly) and probably before then, too. Yet the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Now I'll watch the vid and see whether I was correct.

Watched vid: HA!! That was amazing. My new favorite video. I love it. It's so right on.

(See how jaded and pissed I've become over the constant harping on "the end of publishing?" I guess Penguin feels the same.)

cbenoi1
06-14-2010, 08:01 PM
What a stroke of genius.

-cb

scope
06-14-2010, 09:10 PM
I saw this a while ago, thought it was brilliant and still do. If publishers or the industry ran TV or radio spots I think this would be fantastic. The only thing I would quibble about is the statements that packaging and trends aren't important.

Hallen
06-14-2010, 10:53 PM
The only thing I would quibble about is the statements that packaging and trends aren't important.

Within the scope of that piece, I think that it makes the point that those things are transient and therefore unimportant in the long run. Good writing and the quality of the product is what is important in the long term.

Yes, packaging is important to most products because it helps to attract buyers and it helps with buyer's remorse as well. Trends can become important if the trend is something that is going to settle in as a tradition or a more mainstream phenomenon. Trends are mainly important if you are in a trendy business like fashion. One could argue that today's boom of Urban Fantasy is a trend and will die out shortly. In that case, if that's what you write, then you better get with it. On the other hand, it could be like SF in that it has lots of staying power and will rise and fall naturally over a very long period. If UF is a trend, you're not going to build a career out of writing that genre anyway. If you are the kind of writer who can follow trends and knock out books based on them quickly, then more power to you. I can't do that.

shaldna
06-14-2010, 11:23 PM
that's great

stormie
06-15-2010, 12:05 AM
Excellent! Thanks for posting that link.

ghost
06-15-2010, 01:53 AM
Wow, that's a total rip off of The Lost Generation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA&playnext_from=TL&videos=R7Wh8scJ0Ko

scope
06-15-2010, 02:19 AM
Within the scope of that piece, I think that it makes the point that those things are transient and therefore unimportant in the long run. Good writing and the quality of the product is what is important in the long term.

I understand where you're coming from, and in an ideal publishing world packaging and the anticipation of trends wouldn't count. My point is that when dealing with the real world I believe that packaging always counts and that it's important to try and anticipate trends of the future. I write nonfiction, and while I can't control the former I can try and control the latter.



s

Jorge A.
06-15-2010, 04:02 AM
Wow, that's a total rip off of The Lost Generation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA&playnext_from=TL&videos=R7Wh8scJ0Ko

I've never seen that Lost Generation video. Quite good, thanks for pointing it out. I have to disagree: In art there is no such thing as theft; only inspiration; building on past work; creating on the shoulders of giants (to paraphrase a quote on physics.) Unless, of course, you happen to be stealing art from the the Louvre or something. I would consider that art theft.

Please excuse the excessive use of semi-colons, I am currently reading Moby Dick and it is infecting my sentences.

Christine N.
06-15-2010, 04:20 AM
Brilliant!

CheshireCat
06-15-2010, 04:24 AM
I have to disagree: In art there is no such thing as theft; only inspiration; building on past work; creating on the shoulders of giants (to paraphrase a quote on physics.)

Um. Well, art is one thing, but there is most definitely such a thing as theft in the writing world. It's call copyright infringement, and it's against the law.

You can be inspired by my work all you want, but if you take bits and pieces of it, that's stealing. And an awful lot of people, especially those being raised with the information-rich Internet, don't seem to grasp the concept very well.

Information=free to everyone.

Creative expression=owned by its creator.

Margarita Skies
06-15-2010, 05:37 AM
I just saw this video and I think it was amazing! I am checking out Jonathan Reed's Lost Generation as well. Just waiting for the vid to buffer.

Ton Lew Lepsnaci
06-15-2010, 07:56 PM
Wow, that's a total rip off of The Lost Generation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42E2fAWM6rA&playnext_from=TL&videos=R7Wh8scJ0Ko

Well... it goes back a bit further than that: the "rederijkers" (rhetoricians) in the Netherlands (chased from Flanders (Belgium) because of the fall of Antwerp (Spanish invasion)) produced poems that could be read from left to right (and down) or from right to left (up) [15th - 16th century]. Much more restrictive form than the link cited, but similar in spirit :)

And now I risk Medievalist point out this was old hat even then (?) Just curious...

Jorge A.
06-16-2010, 08:45 AM
Very cool Ton Lew. Will be checking rederijkers in the future

Ton Lew Lepsnaci
06-19-2010, 01:09 AM
Thanks Jorge.

jsh7777
06-20-2010, 09:24 PM
Pretty cool!

Thanks,

SH