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kaitie
06-10-2010, 11:01 AM
Alrighty, let's see. I've got a guy who was murdered and his body was dumped in a river. It washed up on shore and was found late at night. I want my psychic to be able to visit the scene without cops around.

What's the most feasible way to manage it? The guy is fairly famous if that has any bearing on the situation. It's also clear that he wasn't murdered there and just washed up on the river.

My psychic's going to want to get there before the police have a chance to mess the place up (or any more). My original thought was that they might tape off the area and then come back the next morning to search for anything, but they could also probably set up lights and search initially. Or would they potentially have a quick search with lights that night but find nothing and decide to come back in the morning so my psychic can show up in between?

Stanmiller
06-10-2010, 03:59 PM
Seems like yur psychick (slykick?) is about to get busted for interfering with an investigation...hmmmm....

If the body was that of an ex-famous person, you'll have every publicity-hungry politician in the city tripping over each other hoping to get on TV. They won't leave much untrampled.

If the sidenick gets there before the coppers show up, she/he becomes a suspect which adds tension to the proceedings. ;)

--Stan

Maryn
06-10-2010, 05:03 PM
Why does she need to be at the site where it washed ashore? I would think that you might be able to do more by having her be psychic enough to determine where the murder took place before the police do, based on whatever version of psychic she is, and spend time there, absorbing more information about the murder from the place it happened.

Currents are estimates at best, so the cops will be checking out a fairly large area in the hope of identifying the murder scene before rain and people ruin whatever evidence may be there. If your psychic is good, she will already be at the murder scene when a uniformed cop will ask her to leave, since the area is being checked (he won't say why). She would, of course, comply, taking with her whatever knowledge she gained from standing right where it happened.

I could even see a ticking clock of sorts, as she needs to stay to take in more information even though the police are sweeping through the area getting people out of there. Being slow to comply might draw unwanted attention, but if she's really smart, she'll have a cover story, maybe faking a hearing problem or something.

Maryn, hoping this helps

dirtsider
06-10-2010, 06:39 PM
It all depends on whether she's considered a witness or not. If she's already at the scene when the police arrive, she may be detained as a witness. Which means she probably gets to stay in the area until they get some place set up to question the witnesses. They're not going to rule out anyone as a suspect at that point, but if it's obvious the body's been dumped, they're going to take current into account. Also, they're going to do an initial search right away which means bringing in lights, etc. The longer the body and evidence is out in the open, the better chance of something going wrong or getting lost.

Another thing to consider is your psychic's abilities.

1.Does she really need to be that close to the crime scene or can she do psychometry (pick up information from items)?
A: if she doesn't need to be there, why is she? Does she live in the area?

2. Did she have a vision or sense that she needed to be in that area or did she just stumble onto the site?
A: stating that she had a vision about the crime will send up red flags unless the police know her and have worked with them in the past. Otherwise, she might just want to say she was walking, jogging, whatever to cover her tracks.

3. Crime scenes, particularly ones of famous people, are going to attract attention. She could probably hide among the gawkers and do her work from there.

kaitie
06-10-2010, 06:46 PM
Hm...more explanation. ;)

Alright, so they already have a good idea of who did it. Decent, anyway. He was one of their group. They have the body and she's already gotten what she could from it, but the guys who did it were careful and made certain the dead guy didn't see anything that might have tipped her off. So basically she knows what happened to him, but wants to know who the murderers were and what they did.

She isn't actually going to get in trouble because if anything they manage to get the police to let them do their thing even though they aren't supposed to. It is one of their guys, after all.

She wants to see where he washed up in case she can find something else that was on or with the body that the police might have overlooked. If she can get to something like that, she might be able to pull something off it. It's basically one of those super long shot things, but she has to try it anyway. It basically comes up fruitless so she decides to try something else and that works. In theory I could take the scene out, but there's going to be a lot of other character development kind of stuff in there because this is the first time we've ever seen her really work.

Any of that make sense? It's the middle of the night when all this is going on, which is why I was thinking she might have a chance to get down there after it's been cordoned off but before they have tons of people there to investigate. She'd definitely want to get there before the police were there, though (or when no one's around, or only one or two guys) because technically they aren't supposed to be there and she doesn't want to deal with having to convince someone to let them in.

kaitie
06-10-2010, 06:52 PM
It all depends on whether she's considered a witness or not. If she's already at the scene when the police arrive, she may be detained as a witness. Which means she probably gets to stay in the area until they get some place set up to question the witnesses. They're not going to rule out anyone as a suspect at that point, but if it's obvious the body's been dumped, they're going to take current into account. Also, they're going to do an initial search right away which means bringing in lights, etc. The longer the body and evidence is out in the open, the better chance of something going wrong or getting lost.

Another thing to consider is your psychic's abilities.

1.Does she really need to be that close to the crime scene or can she do psychometry (pick up information from items)?
A: if she doesn't need to be there, why is she? Does she live in the area?

2. Did she have a vision or sense that she needed to be in that area or did she just stumble onto the site?
A: stating that she had a vision about the crime will send up red flags unless the police know her and have worked with them in the past. Otherwise, she might just want to say she was walking, jogging, whatever to cover her tracks.

3. Crime scenes, particularly ones of famous people, are going to attract attention. She could probably hide among the gawkers and do her work from there.

She won't be considered a witness or a suspect. The cops know her. Just technically she's not allowed to a scene unless invited on an ongoing investigation. They've got strange rules set up for the group.

1: She's looking for info or objects that might have been missed that can tell her something. She needs to touch something most of the time to get an impression. She's just wondering if something might have washed up along the shore that she could touch.
A: She lives in the city and this is kind of what she does. ;)

2: She didn't have a vision or anything. They got a call that one of their men had been murdered so she went with her boss to see what she could glean from the body. She actually has a vague idea of where it was picked up because she asked the cop and he told her. Technically, she wasn't supposed to even touch the body or anything, but he let her do that as a sort of off the books, "I won't ask what you're doing and as long as I don't know I can't be punished" thing.
A: Yeah, she's just as well known, especially among the police, so they'd know exactly who she is and why she's there.

3: No one knows he's dead yet. Just the cops. They literally just called them in to ID the body and she's going straight there afterward. Even if it hit the news immediately, it's the middle of the night so no real chance of gawkers until morning.

dirtsider
06-10-2010, 09:57 PM
People will probably gawk, even if they don't know who the victim is. If they're awake that is.

Ok, if the police know who she is, they're more inclined to leave her alone, provided she doesn't interfere with the investigation. Especially if the cops have called her team in to ID the body.

kaitie
06-11-2010, 05:39 AM
Well, technically the body is at the hospital. But yeah, they'll leave her alone. The question is more just about standard CSI procedure. Like, would the crime scene investigators go to a scene where the body washed up and work it immediately (and how long would it take? They know it's not the murder scene) even if it was two in the morning to avoid losing evidence, or would they wait until morning when they'd have light? If they would wait (or be finished relatively quickly), would they leave someone to stand guard or would they just tape it off and go? Or if they're finished would they just leave it as is?

Again, it's not the murder scene, but just the place on the river where the body washed up. I imagine that's a little less important than it would be if they knew that was where he'd been killed. I kind of imagine they think the same thing the psychic does: there might be some clue around, but chances aren't very good.

dirtsider
06-11-2010, 04:27 PM
You might look into the "Howdunit" series. It's a series for mystery writers with books that focus on different aspect of crimes. The one you want is Police Procedural. It's written by a LEO.

Other than that, try talking to someone in PR at your local police station. Explain you're writing a novel and then the scene you're going to write. You will probably not only get the proper procedure for the scene but also how the police handle Private Investigators and psychics.

kaitie
06-11-2010, 06:03 PM
That's not a bad idea. I'll have to see if I can find a way to email someone. It's a pain in the ass to try to call because of the time difference. The latter part isn't quite as big of an issue. A big part of the story is built around how the police (and society as a whole) handle the superheroes, so I already know how it's dealt with in the world I'm working on. Thanks. :)

RJK
06-11-2010, 09:42 PM
You will receive a variety of answers, depending on the size of the police department. Los Angeles has more CSI technicians than many small cities have total officers. Where does your crime take place?