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defyalllogic
05-31-2010, 06:52 PM
If you list your publishing credits, do paid and non-paid get the same status?

If it's a submission based magazine or website that you get published in is it the same for paid and non?

would you still say you were published? or just that your work is ________ on this website or in this magazine?

Thanks! (sorry if that was super confusing)

Thump
05-31-2010, 07:15 PM
If someone working for a legitimate publication read it and thought it was good enough for their publication, whether paid or not, you are published. Being published and being paid are not the same thing.
The only thing is, if _you_ paid for the priviledge of being in print, _then_ you're not really published.

ETA: and it counts the same as a paid publication. What would make a difference is the size of your different publishers. Being pubbed with a bigger company counts more than with a small one but how many copies you sold can change the balance but paid or not doesn't matter quite as much.

waylander
05-31-2010, 07:22 PM
Some very good magazines are unable to pay contributors or pay only a token amount.

Jamesaritchie
05-31-2010, 08:35 PM
If you list your publishing credits, do paid and non-paid get the same status?

If it's a submission based magazine or website that you get published in is it the same for paid and non?

would you still say you were published? or just that your work is ________ on this website or in this magazine?

Thanks! (sorry if that was super confusing)


With rare exceptions, no, they don't count the same. It's not even close. Most non-paid publications will, in fact, mean less than not mentioning a credit at all.

The only exceptions are a very few high end literary magazines that do not pay, but still have teh prestige and standards of paid magazines.

Saying you're published means less than nothing. It's the pay rate, teh prestige factor, and the competition lecvel of exactly where you were published that has meaning.

Pretty much anyone can get "published" in non-paying magazines. Very darned few can SELL a story to a good magazine. This is what matters.

Paul
05-31-2010, 08:54 PM
With rare exceptions, no, they don't count the same. It's not even close. Most non-paid publications will, in fact, mean less than not mentioning a credit at all.

The only exceptions are a very few high end literary magazines that do not pay, but still have teh prestige and standards of paid magazines.

Saying you're published means less than nothing. It's the pay rate, teh prestige factor, and the competition lecvel of exactly where you were published that has meaning.

Pretty much anyone can get "published" in non-paying magazines. Very darned few can SELL a story to a good magazine. This is what matters.

About right. But even a less known publication can help as a stepping stone, if you plan a career in journalism. For fiction, unless its literary fiction, not so much.

Gillhoughly
06-03-2010, 01:35 AM
:editor's hat on:


Is non-paid still considered Published?


It is published.

It is not a professional credit.

I only want to know what other editors thought your words were worth money.

If you got published but not paid in some ultra-prestigious literary whatsit, I may find it interesting, but it all comes down to the money. Paying credits only and keep it simple. I have a ton of slush to get through and my caffeine jolt is running out.

Assume I have a short attention span, am reading your work on a hot, stuffy subway full of smelly bums and potential muggers and the lady across the aisle who is wearing a wig on top of her hat is staring at me like she wants to be my next best friend.

When I get home the family will all want something from me and demand it with their outside voices.

Distract me from all that! :D

BenPanced
06-03-2010, 01:43 AM
:editor's hat on:



It is published.

It is not a professional credit.

I only want to know what other editors thought your words were worth money.

If you got published but not paid in some ultra-prestigious literary whatsit, I may find it interesting, but it all comes down to the money. Paying credits only and keep it simple. I have a ton of slush to get through and my caffeine jolt is running out.

Assume I have a short attention span, am reading your work on a hot, stuffy subway full of smelly bums and potential muggers and the lady across the aisle who is wearing a wig on top of her hat is staring at me like she wants to be my next best friend.

When I get home the family will all want something from me and demand it with their outside voices.

Distract me from all that! :D
:snoopy::banana::snoopy::banana::snoopy::banana:
I believe my work here is done.

defyalllogic
06-03-2010, 02:26 AM
Thank you!

scottVee
06-03-2010, 09:42 AM
As for the "value" of that credit, it has been well covered here, with all the variables.

But your work IS published in one very important sense: you have given up some rights to it. Probably first electronic rights, if it was an online magazine. Though, um, a lot of the really amateur ones don't even know what rights are, don't have a contract or agreement, so who knows what really happened? That work of yours can now only (honestly) be resold as a reprint.

Devil Ledbetter
06-03-2010, 12:18 PM
I edit a biannual, non-fic magazine with a print run of 80,000. We do not pay contributors. I cringe at the thought of anyone using publication in our magazine as a writing credit, because I have to edit the living fook out of 93% of the text that's submitted.

James D. Macdonald
06-04-2010, 08:45 PM
A long string of 1/4-cent-a-word and 4theluv credits fills anyone's heart with misgiving. It looks like that's the best you can do. The assumption is that you started out with the top markets and worked your way down -- and those were the only places that would take you.

Better to be thought unpublished than a proven loser.

(And this is why it's a bad plan to send your stuff to the bottom-feeders first "in order to get some sales." It works against you. The lower tier markets will take a brilliant story as fast as they'll take a bad one. Submitting to them first is a form of betting against yourself. When you bet against yourself all that you've done is guarantee that you'll lose.)