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Acey
05-27-2010, 12:50 AM
Hey guys! I'm trying to figure out a setting for my new story. If any of you have read the book The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, I'm looking for some place like that. Charming, unique, somewhat antiquated, preferably with an interesting history. An island would be great, or some small city or state. I don't want a state from US or a city that everyone's heard of. Any ideas? Sorry if this is vague; I can picture the setting of the story in my mind, buut I kind of have to figure out what it is first :)

aadams73
05-27-2010, 01:49 AM
Why don't you make up one? That way it can be whatever you'd like it to be. :)

Ambri
05-27-2010, 02:20 AM
That was the first thing I thought, too. My other suggestion is my state, Colorado, has any number of small, quaint mountain towns, some of which aren't "too" touristy. Look up the towns of Nederland (if you want a hippie vibe), Leadville (for historical vibes and cool old buildings), or the town of Pine (laid back, far enough off the highway to avoid most of the daytrippers, and not near the ski slopes). There's lots and lots of others, like Ouray.

scarletpeaches
05-27-2010, 02:22 AM
Why don't you make up one? That way it can be whatever you'd like it to be. :)Now that's just crazy talk.

blackrose602
05-27-2010, 10:33 AM
Beaufort, South Carolina. It's about halfway between Savannah and Charleston. I'm actually there right now, originally intending to use it just as a base camp. But it's beautifully quaint, and has an amazing Revolutionary War and Civil War history. Off the beaten path, relatively few tourists, just idyllic.

Acey
05-27-2010, 10:04 PM
Thanks for the suggestions! And I would make one up, but I wanted to have it connected to real historical events. Like for example, I once wrote a short story set in Bubank, CA; during WWII, an entire area of the city, the area making weapons for the war, was camouflaged. It was hidden underground beneath a suburb, which had rubber cars and neighborhood scenes painted on canvas to fool enemy aircraft. So cool :)

citymouse
05-27-2010, 10:21 PM
I love Beaufort! Lots of pelicans and cormorants to watch. Very walkable. I had the best corn chowder ever in a tiny cafe on just off the main street.
Good choice for any story.
C



Beaufort, South Carolina. It's about halfway between Savannah and Charleston. I'm actually there right now, originally intending to use it just as a base camp. But it's beautifully quaint, and has an amazing Revolutionary War and Civil War history. Off the beaten path, relatively few tourists, just idyllic.

DavidZahir
05-27-2010, 10:22 PM
There's the Isle of Mull (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_Mull) which has all sorts of tiny towns and tidbits of history going back to the Dark Ages and before.

Romney Marsh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romney_Marsh) is an interesting place, not only for its geography but for its associations with the "Scarecrow of Romney Marsh" (beware--Disney owns the rights to those books).

I once used a fictionalized version of the town where I grew up--Pensacola, Florida (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pensacola,_Florida), which has an interesting "feel" and history (including Civil War and Revolutionary War Battles, hurricanes, the last WWII era aircraft carrier, etc.)

Ever heard of America's Stonehenge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America%27s_Stonehenge)?

Then again, you can fictionalize a fusion of all of these and others if you like!

citymouse
05-27-2010, 10:23 PM
You may want to take a look at Delaware. It's where I live and I think it's the best kept secret on the east coast. Lots of quaint towns.
C

mtrenteseau
05-28-2010, 06:15 AM
Vermont is packed with small towns that have interesting and varied history.

Before you do any writing about a town in Vermont, though, you'd have to research Act 250. It's a low that prevents or at least slows down almost any kind of new construction in the entire state. Someone wanting to enclose a screened porch might wait two years for approval. A Blockbuster Video wanted to take three adjacent spaces in a strip mall and combine them - the permitting took seven years.

This means that new construction has that strict-architectural-standard New-England-town look, and there's some incongruous stuff from the late 60s-early 70s that got in before they passed the law.

Vermont considered becoming an independent country during the Revolution, even though people lined up to cheer Ethan Allen dragging the cannon from Fort Ticoderoga all the way to Boston to use against the British. A band of Confederate soldiers robbed a bank in the far north of the state and fled into Canada. A building could have been built as a hotel, then become a hospital, a school, a convent, back to a hotel, then been turned into an art gallery, leaving ghosts and buried bodies every step of the way.

Ravenlocks
05-30-2010, 04:28 AM
I see you live in California. Why not pick a small town near you that you could easily drive to for research? A small-town/rural CA setting could be interesting and have some history not everyone knows about.

RJK
05-30-2010, 04:34 PM
One place I visited that was exceptionally interesting and had quite a bit of history, was Bath, England.

AkepLeigh
06-01-2010, 10:10 AM
New Bern North Carolina is beautiful and it's also the birth place of pepsi, so you know there's a fun fact!

padnar
06-01-2010, 10:32 AM
One place I visited that was exceptionally interesting and had quite a bit of history, was Bath, England.

Talking of Bath this is also my favourite place, as I find it all romantic books especially written by Barbara Cartland . Her characters mostly go to bath to elope.
padma

Kitty Pryde
06-01-2010, 10:34 AM
Cambria, CA is pretty epically quaint. Or Morro Bay nearby-- I went on a sea kayak tour there right under Hearst Castle and the guide was telling us all manner of crazy stories about the family and their wacky antics on all the land they own in the area. Or Solvang, if you are an old-timey windmill enthusiast.

Newport, Florence, or Astoria in Oregon are pretty neat. Obviously they don't have a super long history, though.