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View Full Version : Is e-publishing a dead end?



iwannabepublished
05-26-2010, 05:16 AM
I've recently found a 'reputable' e-publisher Carina Press, a division of Harlequin Enterprises Ltd. If ONLY e-publishing rights are sold, and my book does sell, will I be immediately rejected by agents I query for regular print publishing? If not, what kind of minimum number of e-published copies would help make an agent more interested?

jennontheisland
05-26-2010, 05:30 AM
Good luck selling only epublishing rights to Harlequin.

suki
05-26-2010, 06:01 AM
I've recently found a 'reputable' e-publisher Carina Press, a division of Harlequin Enterprises Ltd. If ONLY e-publishing rights are sold, and my book does sell, will I be immediately rejected by agents I query for regular print publishing? If not, what kind of minimum number of e-published copies would help make an agent more interested?

Once it is published in any form, including as an e-book, you can not query agents with the book. Period. Unless and until you have a publisher interested, and then you *might* find an agent to broker the reprint deal.

If you sell enough e-copies, you *might* attract the attention of a larger, print publisher. Might. And I don't know what enough copies would be.

With a self-published print book, I'd guess if you sold 5,000 in the first year, you might be able to then approach some larger publishers. I don't know if that number holds true for e-books.

The simple answer is if you envision this book being published by a large trade publisher, do not publish it in any other form.

Of course there are exceptions to the rule - books that are self-published in print or published in e-book form only that ultimately are picked up by larger publishers. But the odds of making that transition are worse than finding an agent and/or selling the book directly to the larger publisher without any prior published form of it.

~suki

KathleenD
05-26-2010, 06:14 AM
Carina buys all rights (the contract is with Harlequin Enterprises). I personally didn't negotiate, being fairly certain a first timer with no sales record wouldn't have any leverage, but I suppose some people might be able to do so.

But as the PP said, it wouldn't matter if they only wanted the digital rights - most publishers seem to want first crack and aren't interested in reprinting unless they specifically say so. A successful self-pub gets picked up once in a blue moon, but even a successful self-pub has had less exposure than many epubs.

Epublished is not a dead end, IMO - you're still published. You're getting a royalty check. Your books are offered for sale in the only market segment that grows every year.

But if your heart is set on having a paper edition in B&N, then no, don't submit to an epub.

Good luck, whatever you decide :)