PDA

View Full Version : Medical Advice Needed



Kitty27
05-22-2010, 12:11 AM
My character is impaled by a sword through her abdomen and survives.


I would like to know what sort of recuperation process and problems she might face from the injury.

Any advice,link,etc is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

PeterL
05-22-2010, 12:15 AM
It would take weeks of bed rest and antibiotics to recover from a wound like that. Without the antibiotics a person would die within a week from that. What kind of antibiotics did she get?

Kitty27
05-22-2010, 12:41 AM
It would take weeks of bed rest and antibiotics to recover from a wound like that. Without the antibiotics a person would die within a week from that. What kind of antibiotics did she get?



Hi,Peter.

I'm still researching about the antibiotics.

When you say weeks,do you mean months? Say,2 or 3?

Cyia
05-22-2010, 12:55 AM
Are we talking present day, when she'd be able to get medical help? Or ancient combat where medical help meant "burn the holes with a hot poker"?

Where in the abdomen? If it hits the abdominal aorta, she's dead.

Straight through? At an angle? Did it go all the way through?

Most decorative swords aren't kept sharp, so the wound is different than from a honed sword. Is it a "real" one made by someone who knew what they were doing? Or one of those shopper's club numbers that can snap if you strike them the wrong way without much force at all?

Stanmiller
05-22-2010, 01:02 AM
;) I'm not a doctor, but I play one on TV.

IMO have it miss the stomach and intestines, that way she'll be up and around in a week or so. Any organ damage and it'll take several week recuperation time.

I have done considerable research on gunshot wounds.

There's at least two other threads in this forum about abdominal wounds (gunshot) but the same considerations apply.

Search this forum with the term abdomen and you come up with a couple right near the top.

--Stan

agentpaper
05-22-2010, 01:03 AM
Cyia's got it right. Also, did it hit any of the organs on the way through. If it hits the intestines or liver, gallbladder, etc, then you have sepsis to deal with, which is HORRENDOUS. If it's today's time, they'd be in a hospital for about at least a week(depending on how traumatic the injury is) and then on bed rest for another 6-8 weeks. And THEN a WHOLE lot of therapy and rest later, they MAY be able to function properly. All in all recovery time could be anywhere between 6 months to a few years, depending on how bad the injury was.

Kitty27
05-22-2010, 01:12 AM
Bless you all!

See how you guys helped me? I didn't even know about the abdominal aorta!

It missed her internal organs and the injury occured in present day.

Hey,Cyia,it's an angel's sword that is razor sharp.

Thanks for the tip,Stanmiller.

Thanks so much, AgentPaper.

Now I'm thinking a sword went through her body,she bled quite a bit,almost died,but came back(story plot).

I'll give her a few weeks in the hospital and about four months of recuperation.

Thank y'all.

Lhun
05-22-2010, 01:21 AM
Most decorative swords aren't kept sharp, so the wound is different than from a honed sword. Is it a "real" one made by someone who knew what they were doing? Or one of those shopper's club numbers that can snap if you strike them the wrong way without much force at all?Most *real* swords aren't very sharp. At least not ones that were designed and used by cultures that also had the knowledge to produce armor.
That aside, the sword is most likely not sterile, so a serious infection is a possibility even if it doesn't hit the digestive tract.

Cyia
05-22-2010, 01:34 AM
Most *real* swords aren't very sharp. At least not ones that were designed and used by cultures that also had the knowledge to produce armor.

Depends on the style and age of the sword. Some Pro swordsmiths keep their "working" swords sharpened for demonstrations. Display models aren't sharpened because of the danger.

Lhun
05-22-2010, 03:01 AM
Depends on the style and age of the sword. Some Pro swordsmiths keep their "working" swords sharpened for demonstrations. Display models aren't sharpened because of the danger.Well, as i said, real swords designed for potential use against armor. They're not sharp because thin sharp edges just break when hitting metal anyway, and because sharpness isn't even important for swords.
As seen here:
http://www.thearma.org/Videos/Blunt_Bastard-Sword_onBamboo.MOV

justAnotherWriter
05-22-2010, 03:14 AM
Most *real* swords aren't very sharp. At least not ones that were designed and used by cultures that also had the knowledge to produce armor.
That aside, the sword is most likely not sterile, so a serious infection is a possibility even if it doesn't hit the digestive tract.


That is a myth.

Japanese swords were designed to cut through some types (by far not all) of Japanese armor and were exceptionally sharp with strong, robust edges.

European swords (and sword in general, including Japanese) cannot cut through European armor. Not mail, not plate armor. Not even a little bit. Therefore such sword's edges were not designed for use against armor. Even swords such as Oakeshott's type XVa, which were designed to thrust into mail (and therefore the gaps in plate) and were narrow and thick could be made shaving sharp without compromising the edge integrity (an edge of any practical angle can be made sharp enough to shave with).

While we're dispelling myths, let's also talk about a sword's weight. Your average single hand European sword weighed 2.5 lbs or less, as did your average katana (usually less). A longsword (a sword meant to be used in two hands but light enough to be used in one in a pinch) was usually between 3 and 3.5 lbs. A 12th-13th Century greatsword, a massive sword designed to hew through textile armored levies, was also between 3 and 3.5lbs. In the 16th century we start to see true two handed swords, sometimes over 6' in total length (e.g. the German Zweihander) which start to approach 5 or sometimes even 6lbs, but these are more of a polearm than a sword.

GeorgeK
05-22-2010, 05:03 PM
Sword wounds are different than GSW's by far, even when only compared to low velocity rounds. By comparison, swords are extremely low velocity. It is conceivable that a sword, depending upon its course might miss vital organs. It's very rare, but at least believable, (particularly if magic is involved which it almost certainly is considering it's an angel's sword). If it perforates the bowel, antibiotics will not help since antibiotics only go where there's either blood or urine Flowing. Antibiotics do not get into abcesses or hematomas. What they do is hopefully help contain the infection while your body either fights or dies. Before appendectomies (which was before antibiotics), 25% of people survived a burst appendix. In those cases the abcess was able to be walled off in such a way that there was no bowel obstruction (which given its location, the appendix is the most likely bowel perforation to have a shot at this), it gradually ate its way through the abdominal wall and finally drained and healed over a course of months to years and was very debilitating during the recuperation.

For nonmagical swords, avoid the center third of the abdomen assuming vertical thirds, and have the course of the blade aim away from the center. that way it might not even enter the abdominal compartment and all you have is muscle damage, which is not fun, but has a good chance of healing.

Lhun
05-22-2010, 05:43 PM
Japanese swords were designed to cut through some types (by far not all) of Japanese armor and were exceptionally sharp with strong, robust edges.Unfortunately only in anime. Japanese swords could afford to be sharpened, because they didn't have the technology to produce good metal armor. But even the available armor couldn't be cut.

justAnotherWriter
05-22-2010, 08:39 PM
Unfortunately only in anime. Japanese swords could afford to be sharpened, because they didn't have the technology to produce good metal armor. But even the available armor couldn't be cut.

Please stop spreading misinformation.

Japanese had very good armor, made from a variety of materials, including metal plates laced together with silk. Later period Japanese armor, influenced by Western designs, even included single piece steel breastplates, etc. However, not all Japanese armor was made of metal (1000+ years is a long time to generalize), and even metal armor had elements that were vulnerable (gaps, weak spots, so on).

Stanmiller
05-22-2010, 09:24 PM
Ooooohhh. It's ON. Where's the popcorn?

Lhun
05-26-2010, 12:49 PM
Please stop spreading misinformation.

Japanese had very good armor, made from a variety of materials, including metal plates laced together with silk. Later period Japanese armor, influenced by Western designs, even included single piece steel breastplates, etc.Yes, not surprisingly, after contact with europe, japan adopted steel plate armor. Earlier armor was made from iron and bronze however, and not plate armor, but a variety of other designs. Scales and laminated armor were among the designs containing the most metal parts, but none of those are as problematic to hit with a sharpened sword as steel plate.
All of this is completely besides the point though, which was that japanese swords were not able to cut the available armor types, and would much less have been able to cut steel plate armor. (And weren't able to from the 16th century onwards when advanced metallurgy had been imported)

Tsu Dho Nimh
05-26-2010, 04:12 PM
My character is impaled by a sword through her abdomen and survives.

I would like to know what sort of recuperation process and problems she might face from the injury.

What does the plot need? Tell us that and we can work backwards for the scenario to give you that result.

You can have anything between a close call to near-instantaneous death to prolonged recovery ... what do you need.