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Dreaming
05-20-2010, 09:23 AM
...slash my trade paperback by 60%? My book hasn't been selling in droves by any means, but there's certainly been a steady stream of sales. I'm often in the 60,000-200,000 ranking - have yet to go over 600,000. I've seen other YA authors cover price remain untouched even though they're selling even less than i am.

Enlighten me please:poke:

dgiharris
05-20-2010, 09:49 AM
I would say simple supply and demand.

Did your publisher print too many copies that aren't moving?

Storage costs vary according to location, but lets say it costs around $500 a month in fees to store 10,000 books. It wouldn't take long before the fees really start to cut into the profits if the books aren't moving.

To be fair, I haven't crunched numbers on book storage and am not overly familair with book distribution. But off the top of my head, I would imagine that the answer to why Amazon or any major seller would discount a product is due to typical supply demand economics. And if something isn't moving as anticipated, then they lower price to help facilitate sales...

that would be my guess

Mel...

Dreaming
05-20-2010, 09:52 AM
Awww Gee, just as I feared. Thanks for your input.

Guess i Gotta get to Marketing 101 :Shrug:

dpaterso
05-20-2010, 10:11 AM
Dare I suggest, with tongue partly in cheek, that Marketing 101 also covers including a link to your book in your sigline so folks can check it out and maybe even buy a copy! :)

-Derek

Dreaming
05-20-2010, 10:23 AM
Aww, you're too sweet!

But I'm here for advice and "writerly camaraderie"
In short, I wanna ask questions and let my hair down. I mean, what if I ask a stupid question? Or share a personal situation (which I've already done (see office party), I'd be the laughing stock of the YA race! Egads!:cry:

M.R.J. Le Blanc
05-20-2010, 11:05 AM
The only stupid question is the one you don't ask. And linking books you've written is sort of part of the 'writerly camaraderie'. Have a look around, you'll see many who do it :)

Terie
05-20-2010, 11:38 AM
If Amazon is the only one who slashed your price, it doesn't necessarily mean you'll earn less in royalties. It all depends on how your contract is written. And with a lower price, you might sell more to make up any difference anyway. Even if, say, you get only half the usual royalty, if you sell, say, three times as many copies, you come out ahead.

And 60%? That ain't nuthin'! I found out this week that the French Canadian publisher of my series has lowered the first book in the French edition to $.99 (CAN). Which kinda sucker-punched me at first, but then, it appears that lots of books are moving, which, in the end, is what it's all about--people reading them. I'm wondering (and have no way to check) if it's a promo to get more sales of the rest of the series, and that's totally all right by me!

shaldna
05-20-2010, 12:59 PM
And 60%? That ain't nuthin'! I found out this week that the French Canadian publisher of my series has lowered the first book in the French edition to $.99 (CAN). Which kinda sucker-punched me at first, but then, it appears that lots of books are moving, which, in the end, is what it's all about--people reading them. I'm wondering (and have no way to check) if it's a promo to get more sales of the rest of the series, and that's totally all right by me!
#

And all those people who pick up the first book on impulse at $.99 could buy the second book at full price.

cbenoi1
05-20-2010, 04:13 PM
> And all those people who pick up the first book on impulse at $.99
> could buy the second book at full price

Feu de Printemps went out-of-stock this week, which is a bit telling where the kids are in their readings...

-cb

jclarkdawe
05-20-2010, 05:29 PM
There could be a bunch of reasons:


Loss leader -- Might be being used to increase sales for something else.
Revenue generator -- Businesses hold sales to increase volume.
Too much inventory -- As stated, they could have too many boxes sitting around that they need to move.
Experimenting on price point -- Amazon might be wondering if lower price moves your book or books in general or books in your genre better.
Remainder bin -- Someone might have decided your book belongs in the remainder bin.
Random mistake -- Someone might have hit the wrong button on the computer.
Publisher told them to -- Publishers tell sellers to do various things on price, either to all distributors or to just one.
And a whole bunch others.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

stephenf
05-20-2010, 05:39 PM
You don't mention the title of your book, so I could not take a look.But when you say your book is on Amazon ,who is actually selling it.Most books are not sold by Amazon themselves but third party book Sellers .Once there is more than one, the price will fall.No book seller wants a load of books that are falling in price,so the vicious circle begins and the price can fall really quickly.Amazon ranking has noting to do with the price.A valuable book would be in the bottom million,because Amazon has never sold a copy.There are lots of best Sellers on Amazon that you can buy for not much more than the postage.

willietheshakes
05-20-2010, 06:05 PM
Most books are not sold by Amazon themselves but third party book Sellers .

Er... "most"?

DeleyanLee
05-20-2010, 06:13 PM
Amazon at least did have warehouses. When I worked for a small specialty press, Amazon would order a small handful of books for any one of their four warehouses. This was at the turn of the century, so not all THAT long ago. We were never sent an order to be sent directly to the customer, FWIW. Everything always got shipped to one of their warehouses.

I'm not sure why Amazon would put a sale on the OP's book, but I doubt lack of storage space would be the problem. According to our contract with Amazon (which I thought sucked mightily, but the boss signed it), all shipping costs were the responsibility of the publisher (along with a standard 55% discount) and there was more once Amazon would ship BACK some books for whatever reason and charge us for the shipping. Then 2-3 days later, we'd get an order for the same amount of books to be returned to the warehouse. They really weren't shy about such things and I doubt that has changed much.

Terie
05-20-2010, 06:16 PM
> And all those people who pick up the first book on impulse at $.99
> could buy the second book at full price

Feu de Printemps went out-of-stock this week, which is a bit telling where the kids are in their readings...

(For those who don't know [being most of y'all reading this thread...LOL!], 'Feu de Printemps' is the French translation of the third book in my four-book YA series.)

Also, I just discovered that the fourth (and last) book in the series was released last month. (Well, the French translation thereof.) They appear to have done another press run with the special price on the cover of 'Quete d'Automne', which is pretty cool. So I'm wondering if it's part of a promo for the last book coming out. Who knows? I just shot off an e-mail to my US editor to inquire, but I don't know if he'll be able to discover anything.

cbenoi1 is generously keeping me informed of what's going on. Ain't AW a grand place?!

cwfgal
05-20-2010, 06:22 PM
60%? That's nothing. Wait until your book goes out of print and can be bought used for a penny. That's humbling.

Beth

Dreaming
05-20-2010, 07:16 PM
Thanks for all of your input. You guys are great. :)

Well, I can definitely say it's not an overstock issue. Every time I turn around, I see "3 left in stock" more on the way. I also see that my book has been selling consistently, though not impressively. Perhaps one or two a day, or every other day, and it's been out for a year, without any major promotion. I'm the type of writer who gets discouraged very easily, and I suck at marketing.

However, that's all gonna change. Got a plan in the works! ;)

stephenf
05-20-2010, 08:50 PM
Er... "most"?

That's right.I had a quick look at, Before I Wake, on Amazon UK.There are 110 sellers trying to sell the 2008 paperback version, new and second hand . Amazon have 5 copies. Once you have reached that situation, the reverse auction, that is operated on Amazon, has run it course and the book becomes valueless. Thats cash wise ,not artistically.

willietheshakes
05-20-2010, 09:39 PM
That's right.I had a quick look at, Before I Wake, on Amazon UK.There are 110 sellers trying to sell the 2008 paperback version, new and second hand . Amazon have 5 copies. Once you have reached that situation, the reverse auction, that is operated on Amazon, has run it course and the book becomes valueless. Thats cash wise ,not artistically.

I'm not saying there aren't marketplace sellers, or that there might be more copies of a particular title available through the marketplace. But to say that most books sold by Amazon aren't sold by Amazon per se has a wide variety of connotations, most of which wouldn't be accurate.

Also, "reverse auction"?

brainstorm77
05-20-2010, 09:42 PM
Amazon has remainder bins?

stephenf
05-20-2010, 10:43 PM
I'm not saying there aren't marketplace sellers, or that there might be more copies of a particular title available through the marketplace. But to say that most books sold by Amazon aren't sold by Amazon per se has a wide variety of connotations, most of which wouldn't be accurate.



Also, "reverse auction"?

Originally Amazon was Internet retailer.Amazon has become a Internet market place ,like e-bay,were Amazon the retailer is one among thousands of others. you can easily check for your self.


I put a book on Amazon for ten pounds.Another book seller offers the same book for nine pounds seventy five .I now can hope he will sell all his books or I offer mine at nine pounds fifty=reverse auction.

There are some book sellers that use software to adjust there prices, so you can never undercut them.

veinglory
05-20-2010, 10:55 PM
Indeed, but most of the books bought (in terms of volume) from Amazon are probably those vended by Amazon and shipped from them.

willietheshakes
05-21-2010, 12:47 AM
Originally Amazon was Internet retailer.Amazon has become a Internet market place ,like e-bay,were Amazon the retailer is one among thousands of others. you can easily check for your self.

Did you miss the part where I referred to the Amazon Marketplace sellers?

However -- Amazon is FAR from just "one among thousands". That's a gross mischaracterization. As is the equivalency with eBay.


I put a book on Amazon for ten pounds.Another book seller offers the same book for nine pounds seventy five .I now can hope he will sell all his books or I offer mine at nine pounds fifty=reverse auction.

There are some book sellers that use software to adjust there prices, so you can never undercut them.

Certainly.
But Amazon itself doesn't participate in these "reverse auctions".


Indeed, but most of the books bought (in terms of volume) from Amazon are probably those vended by Amazon and shipped from them.

Which would be my point...

stephenf
05-21-2010, 11:11 PM
However -- Amazon is FAR from just "one among thousands". That's a gross mischaracterization. As is the equivalency with eBay.



Certainly.
But Amazon itself doesn't participate in these "reverse auctions".



Which would be my point...


There are thousands of book sellers on Amazon and Amazon do participate the reverse auction ..Just have a look at the top one hundred books on Amazon .Most if not all are being discounted, all ,except pre orders,will have a number of different sellers offering the books.
As for the total percentage of book Amazon sell.I don't know and unless you are a Amazon insider you will probably no know ether.

The advise I would give anybody thinking of becoming a book seller is ,don't it's a business to getting out of, not into. That is what Amazon are doing.

maestrowork
05-21-2010, 11:48 PM
...slash my trade paperback by 60%? My book hasn't been selling in droves by any means, but there's certainly been a steady stream of sales. I'm often in the 60,000-200,000 ranking - have yet to go over 600,000. I've seen other YA authors cover price remain untouched even though they're selling even less than i am.

Enlighten me please:poke:

It's most likely the decision made between your publisher and Amazon. Most publishers give substantial discounts. That shouldn't affect your royalties if you're on gross, not net.

willietheshakes
05-22-2010, 12:56 AM
There are thousands of book sellers on Amazon and Amazon do participate the reverse auction ..Just have a look at the top one hundred books on Amazon .Most if not all are being discounted, all ,except pre orders,will have a number of different sellers offering the books.
As for the total percentage of book Amazon sell.I don't know and unless you are a Amazon insider you will probably no know ether.

You're mischaracterizing this, to support an unsupportable point.
Amazon doesn't participate in any sort of auction as you're describing -- Amazon discounts books (and all other items) from the MSRP, a vastly different thing.
IE, in an auction, the highest bid wins the item. In a reverse auction, conversely, the lowest bid would win the item. So why isn't Amazon charging $.01, as many of the marketplace sellers do? Because they're not participating. It's simply not their sales model, and you are in error to claim it to be.


The advise I would give anybody thinking of becoming a book seller is ,don't it's a business to getting out of, not into. That is what Amazon are doing.

Speaking as a bookseller of twenty years: show me a statement where Amazon says they're trying to get out of the business?

That's simply a ridiculous claim.

Begbie
05-22-2010, 01:17 AM
Dare I suggest, with tongue partly in cheek, that Marketing 101 also covers including a link to your book in your sigline so folks can check it out and maybe even buy a copy! :)

-Derek


I agree with Derek. Now let's see this advice in action! Everyone click the link below and I'll watch Amazon's numbers today and report back. :D

Kidding... But in all seriousness, I debated whether to put a link to my book in my sigline, too. I'm sure I've asked some stupid questions, and even worse, I've probably provided a few dumb answers. But ultimately, the work will speak for itself and I doubt our readers are going to go searching for the imbecilic things we say in writers forums.

That said, Amazon's prices seem to fluctuate fairly often - even on some new books. My book started at $16.49, rose to $18.79, then dropped back to $16.49 in the span of a week. I think it's a lot of trial and error as well as supply and demand.

CheshireCat
05-22-2010, 05:44 AM
http://bookmarketingmaven.typepad.com/book_marketing_maven/2010/04/how-amazons-pricing-affects-author-and-publisher-profits.html

When not indiscriminately grabbing authors' intellectual property, Google can be your friend.