PDA

View Full Version : Yet Another for the Classicists



Smiling Ted
05-08-2010, 08:49 PM
Hi, Gang!

You were so helpful with my previous Latin needs that I'm coming back for more.

I'm looking for the Latin equivalent of "amen" or "indeed" or "I agree" - a word or brief phrase to indicate assent. If it is often used in a ritual or religious context, so much the better.

Thanks!

OneWriter
05-08-2010, 09:05 PM
Oh, goody!! I was waiting for more!! :)

Amen has a Greek origin, and I have no idea whether the Romans used it -- does anybody know? Obviously Ecclesiastic Latin uses it.

Ita can be used as yes, and the expression ita vivam is used as in "for the life of me" or "as true as life". I'm sure there's a ton I can't think of right now, so I'll pass the mic to the other classicist here.... ;)

More options:
Cōnsentiō -- I agree.
Hoc (or ipsum) certum est -- that is certain.
Veritatem dixisti -- you said the truth (or dices, you say)

PeterL
05-08-2010, 09:21 PM
Hoc ille est. That's it.

Rufus Coppertop
05-11-2010, 05:44 PM
Oh, goody!! I was waiting for more!! :)

Ipsum mihi!


I'm sure there's a ton I can't think of right now, so I'll pass the mic to the other classicist here.... ;)

This lot

Cōnsentiō -- I agree.
Hoc (or ipsum) certum est -- that is certain.
Veritatem dixisti -- you said the truth (or dices, you say) is pretty damn good!

It's funny, as soon as I read the OP, I thought, "ita". You beat me to it!

What about "ipsum est" by itself? "The same is!"
Now I wouldn't have thought of that unless I'd read your
"hoc (or ipsum) certum est"!
I might have to use that one in my own WIP.
Iocumne habemus vel quid?

Smiling Ted, I was also hoping for more. Please keep asking for stuff!

BTW I'll see if I can think of something ritualistic.

Rufus Coppertop
05-11-2010, 06:18 PM
If it is often used in a ritual or religious context, so much the better.
Thanks!

A few possibilities.

ipsum mihi fiat! - May the same be to me / for me!
ipsum nobis! - The same for us!
ipsum fiat nobis! - May the same be for us!

Is this the style of thing you're looking for?

OneWriter
05-11-2010, 08:45 PM
Iocumne habemus vel quid?



Certum est!

--Ha. You had me reach for the dictionary on that one!!! ;)

The only religious thing I could think of is from the gospel, when Jesus replies "You said it"

BUT: (1) I don't know if you want a gospel reference in your WIP.
(2) I can't find a Latin Bible to get the exact quote. I would assume it'd be "Ipsum dixisti" or equivalent....

Smiling Ted
05-12-2010, 03:35 AM
So many great suggestions!

Thanks, one and all!

Smiling Ted
05-12-2010, 11:15 PM
What about "verum est"? Does that make sense?

PeterL
05-12-2010, 11:18 PM
What about "verum est"? Does that make sense?

No it doesn't make sense. What is it supposed to mean?

But "In vino veritas" makes sense.

OneWriter
05-12-2010, 11:22 PM
Ipsum verum est = that is true.

It does make sense... and it's way better than anything I'd come up with, so I guess I'm ready to retire....

:Headbang:

GeorgeK
05-12-2010, 11:22 PM
Salute (pronounced Sal You Tay (at least as far as I was taught, but it was hilarious when 2 teachers argued about it to the point of almost fisticuffs, eventually one asked me and I said, "I don't believe that they've found any tape recordings))

The BIG thing about a Roman Prayer is that the whole Greek thing was a minor cult and considered rather depraved by most. They were Anamystic (look it up, that actually will help you understand it better)

A typical prayer would address a deity and then apologize if they've maybe mispronounced the name, aske for what they want, apologize again for having the audacity to ask, Stamp a few times, maybe clap and then say goodbye.

mscelina
05-12-2010, 11:29 PM
A couple of broader options:

consensus gentium
Unanimity of nations; widespread agreement

consensus omnium
Agreement of all members

OneWriter
05-12-2010, 11:29 PM
Salute (pronounced Sal You Tay (at least as far as I was taught, but it was hilarious when 2 teachers argued about it to the point of almost fisticuffs, eventually one asked me and I said, "I don't believe that they've found any tape recordings))


As far as I know, salute is a greeting, from salutare = to greet.
I think you mean to use it in the meaning of "I pay respect" and hence it could be intended as I agree, but it would have to be "saluto"...

Mhm... Now I'm having a conundrum: te saluto means I greet you, but if one says tibi saluto, would it be more of "I agree with you"?

mscelina
05-12-2010, 11:31 PM
No. Salve/salute should be used in the context of a greeting only.

However, you *could* use "sic" to mean just a quick yes.

OneWriter
05-12-2010, 11:38 PM
No. Salve/salute should be used in the context of a greeting only.


They are both Italian though, not Latin... Or maybe Medieval Latin, but Classic Latin would be salvus and saluto... I think.
I was addressing the use of the verb salutare.

ETA: Ah, salute from salus, not from the verb salutare.... salute would then be the ablative.... Maybe there's an omitted cum, as in "cum salute eas" or "cum salute sis" (?) and later abbreviated to just salute? Definitely a greeting then.

GeorgeK
05-12-2010, 11:56 PM
In the later empire it changed to Salve (Sal. Vay) but I'm pretty sure it was Salute during the Republic. The prayers were actually a thing I found most interesting and weren't in the Loeb collection. There was one particular professor who always had her own handouts. She was...never disputed. It was almost as if the other teachers feared her. I grant that it is possible that my memory could be wrong, or she could have been wrong, but I don't think so, at least on this.

The Romans were a very superstitious lot and I sort of gathered that it was considered bad mojo for them to say "Goodbye" to a god as if that might be taken as a threat, and so the prayers started and ended with "Hello". Even in grad school it was a controversial topic.

GeorgeK
05-13-2010, 12:02 AM
They are both Italian though, not Latin... Or maybe Medieval Latin, but Classic Latin would be salvus and saluto... I think.
I was addressing the use of the verb salutare.

ETA: Oh, salute from salus, not from the verb salutare.... salute would then be the ablative....

My memory could be off, but I think it was the imperative.

OneWriter
05-13-2010, 12:10 AM
The Romans were a very superstitious lot and I sort of gathered that it was considered bad mojo for them to say "Goodbye" to a god as if that might be taken as a threat, and so the prayers started and ended with "Hello". Even in grad school it was a controversial topic.

Interesting. That may be why we still use the same word for hi and good-bye. Because originally it was ave and vale, but now all we say is ciao. Very convenient! :D

Rufus Coppertop
05-13-2010, 06:59 AM
What about "verum est"? Does that make sense?

It makes perfect sense. Verum as a neuter nominative meaning "true" can also be used as a substantive meaning "truth" or it can be an adverb meaning "truly".

So, 'verum est' can mean it is true, it is truth or truly it is.

If you want to add ita, to say verum ita est, you end up with truly it is so.

Some possibilities if you leave the verb "to be" implied:

verum - truly
verum ita - truly thus / truly so
verum hoc - truly this
verum illud - truly that
verum ipsum - the same truly

or what about, verumne non est = ain't that the truth?

Rufus Coppertop
05-13-2010, 08:03 AM
No it doesn't make sense.

Verum non est!



But "In vino veritas" makes sense.

Verum est!