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LittleSpider
05-05-2010, 04:27 AM
I met an agent at a conference recently, and she read some of my work. She was very enthusiastic about my voice, but also gave me a tip on a sort of plot change she'd like to see that is rather over-arching. She specifically told me to send her the full after I've put in my best effort at implementing said change.

What time frame should I aim for? Does it matter? I am slow at editing, and I don't want to wait so long to send it to her that she doesn't even remember me. I also don't want to give it too fast of a job and have her feel that I didn't take her thoughts seriously.

Wayne K
05-05-2010, 04:33 AM
Do it right, but don't be obnoxious about the time, and you'll be fine. Congratulations and good luck

LittleSpider
05-05-2010, 05:23 AM
Thanks, Wayne. What counts as obnoxious though? Three months? More? Way more? Less?

Wayne K
05-05-2010, 05:42 AM
Talk to the agent. She'll let you know

suki
05-05-2010, 06:40 AM
I met an agent at a conference recently, and she read some of my work. She was very enthusiastic about my voice, but also gave me a tip on a sort of plot change she'd like to see that is rather over-arching. She specifically told me to send her the full after I've put in my best effort at implementing said change.

What time frame should I aim for? Does it matter? I am slow at editing, and I don't want to wait so long to send it to her that she doesn't even remember me. I also don't want to give it too fast of a job and have her feel that I didn't take her thoughts seriously.

It would be better to take the time to make it right than send something sooner that wasn't your best work. She implicitly told you to take the time you need. So, when you are ready to send it, simply remind her in the cover letter that she requested it and explain that you considered and then implemented her suggestion(s). She'd likely be more impressed with your taking longer time but delivering a more quality manuscript, than rushing and delivering something less than your best work.

And while I agree with Wayne that you shouldn't dawdle (ie, stick it on a shelf for 3 months while you work on other things even though you could be working on the requested manuscript, etc), I think you should take whatever time you need to make it the best possible manuscript you can make it.

good luck.

~suki

cate townsend
05-05-2010, 07:59 AM
Agree with all above advice. All that matters to the agent is what you can deliver--the story, and however long it takes is however long it takes. Make it your priority.

Danthia
05-05-2010, 04:06 PM
One more note to add...

This is a great opportunity for that agent to see how you work (and you can see how she works). So take whatever time you need, but still be professional about it. Show the agent that this is what they can expect from you as a client, so think if it as a mini job interview.

If you naturally work fast, great. If you're a slower reviser, great. Just treat it as if this were your "real" agent asking for this and then behave accordingly. Good practice!

Jamesaritchie
05-05-2010, 05:13 PM
The agent said "best effort", so do as she asked, and take the time to get it right.

If you agree with the changes she wants. If not, look for another agent.

skippingstone
05-05-2010, 10:19 PM
Also, I read an agent blog recently in which she said she never forgets when she's asked for a full. Even a year later. Just do your best and send when you're ready.

scope
05-05-2010, 11:33 PM
Of course take your time to make the revisions suggested and send her the manuscript when you are ready. If you get it right and truly believe you have accomplished what the agent wants, the amount of time it takes you to do so is basically unimportant. Sitting here and not knowing what you have to do makes it next to impossible to put a time stamp on this. In general, I would say 6 weeks to 3 months.

A couple of things to consider:
1. Make sure you wholeheartedly agree with the revisions asked for. Don't just make them to please this one agent. Hell, she may ultimately pass on your revised work or may even be out of the business by the time you are ready to resubmit (no problem if you believe the revisions to be made improve your work).

2. If you have queries out to other agents, including partials or fulls, what do you intend to do?

3. Are going to query other agents while making the revisions or after making the revisions?

LittleSpider
05-06-2010, 06:34 AM
Thanks, everyone. This has been very helpful. To reply to a few issues:

I do agree with the revisions asked for. They were spot-on.

I haven't sent queries out to any other agents, and I'm not going to query other agents until a) I've implemented the changes said agent suggested, because she's totally right and b) I get a rejection from said agent. Because she really impressed me, and I love the stuff she's sold in the past, and I think she'd be a fab agent, and I'd rather take things slowly and wait to possibly get what I want than rush.