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YAwriter72
04-21-2010, 05:06 PM
A friend is helping me with this scene and we narrowed down the cards that would be best for the MC. What I need is someone to write a "reading" based on these cards. (Mine is really flat so far!)

About my MC. She has just discovered that she can cross over to the 7th Astral Plane and has learned some "very bad stuff" that some "very bad people" want from her. She already has psychic abilities, but her Gram is the one doing the reading on her. I need this to lay the foundation for the final showdown.

10 of Swords
Death
The Hanged Man
9 of Swords
9 of Cups

I know what they each mean, but I'm trying to put them together in an interesting way so that I'm not just info dumping this scene.

Feel free to PM me too, if you have any questions or want to send it that way.

Thanks!!!

Kalyke
04-21-2010, 05:25 PM
Are they right side up, or upside down? That has a bearing on the reading.

DeleyanLee
04-21-2010, 05:28 PM
Are they right side up, or upside down? That has a bearing on the reading.

Depending on the reader. ;) Not all readers use the reverse meanings, after all.

YAwriter72
04-21-2010, 05:56 PM
These are all right side up, so no reverse meanings needed on this one. Oh and they are in the 5 card horseshoe spread.

wysewomon
04-21-2010, 06:38 PM
I've been a professional reader for over thirty years. Here's my take:

First of all, every spread is different. The "meanings" of the cards you get from the little booklet that comes with them usually have no bearing whatsoever. A lot depends on what the reader sees and notices at the time. For example, you may notice the detail that a figure in the card is wearing a belt made of grape leaves at one time and it may seem significant. Then you need to explore that concept in your mind, to see how it fits in. Do grape leaves symbolize renewal? Or abundance? or something else. Details of the images matter.

The positions of the cards and the "meanings" of the positions actually have less bearing than the cards' relationships to each other. If one figure is holding a sword, is it pointing to something in another card? How are the two linked? Putting the relationships together helps the reader make a complete picture of the situation.

Oh. it's also relevant which deck you're using. Every deck is different and each will give a different reading for the same question. Some decks tend to be really superficial. Others almost always pose deep questions and give deep answers.

I don't actually know the five-card horseshoe layout. But here is my overall impression. I'm basing this information on the idea that you're using some form of the Rider-Waite deck, which is the most common.

The ten of Swords denotes a nightmare situation where things can go very wrong very fast. Swords rule the mind, so a lot of the issue is with thoughts, fears and ideas. There's very little to be done about the presence of this card in a reading; it definitely means the querent is in a bad place and will just have to get through it as well as she can. Sometimes this card can mean physical danger and death, the loss of hope, the most terrible outcome imaginable. Bad news.

Death is actually a hopeful card here. Death does not signify loss of life as it does change and transition. Because it's one of the Major Arcana, this will be a major change. The seeker must make the choice to take control of her life and steer it in the directions she chooses, rather than let herself be battered by the winds of fate. If she does, she can turn a bad situation to her advantage and realize her own power.

Then Hanged Man is also very significant, being another Major Arcana. Sometimes called, The Three-fold Death," it signifies sacrifice and a willingness to place others before one's self in order to achieve the betterment of all. The seeker my put her own dreams and desires, hopes and fears aside and face what's in front of her with fortitude, knowing she may lose herself in the process.

The nine of swords is another tough card. It means battle. A struggle is coming which the seeker may not survive. However, because it is minor arcana, this card is less important than others. It's important not to focus on the battle, because that can intensify fear and make one forget that the real issue here is transformation, self-sacrifice and growth.

The nine of cups is an odd choice, I think. It's a wish-fulfillment card. Generally it is taken to mean a good outcome, but there's always the danger of fooling one's self and letting one's own desires rule one's actions. It also carries the idea of having a feast spread before you and needing to choose between options. Sometimes it signifies gluttony. If you want to show a positive outcome in this reading, I'd consider the ten of cups, or even The World. Oh, and cups rule emotion. So the nine of cups basically means, at the end of everything you're going to feel really good, but there's still a question as to whether you've accomplished anything real.

In summary: Your MC is in a dangerous, nightmarish position. A big change is coming in her life. To overcome the obstacles before her, she must confront them without thought of her own welfare. There will be strife, but the danger to her person is less than the danger to her soul if she doesn't choose the right path. IN the end, it's likely things will turn out all right.

Hope this helps.

WW

YAwriter72
04-21-2010, 07:18 PM
I've been a professional reader for over thirty years. Here's my take:

First of all, every spread is different. The "meanings" of the cards you get from the little booklet that comes with them usually have no bearing whatsoever. A lot depends on what the reader sees and notices at the time. For example, you may notice the detail that a figure in the card is wearing a belt made of grape leaves at one time and it may seem significant. Then you need to explore that concept in your mind, to see how it fits in. Do grape leaves symbolize renewal? Or abundance? or something else. Details of the images matter.

The positions of the cards and the "meanings" of the positions actually have less bearing than the cards' relationships to each other. If one figure is holding a sword, is it pointing to something in another card? How are the two linked? Putting the relationships together helps the reader make a complete picture of the situation.

Oh. it's also relevant which deck you're using. Every deck is different and each will give a different reading for the same question. Some decks tend to be really superficial. Others almost always pose deep questions and give deep answers.

I don't actually know the five-card horseshoe layout. But here is my overall impression. I'm basing this information on the idea that you're using some form of the Rider-Waite deck, which is the most common.

The ten of Swords denotes a nightmare situation where things can go very wrong very fast. Swords rule the mind, so a lot of the issue is with thoughts, fears and ideas. There's very little to be done about the presence of this card in a reading; it definitely means the querent is in a bad place and will just have to get through it as well as she can. Sometimes this card can mean physical danger and death, the loss of hope, the most terrible outcome imaginable. Bad news.

Death is actually a hopeful card here. Death does not signify loss of life as it does change and transition. Because it's one of the Major Arcana, this will be a major change. The seeker must make the choice to take control of her life and steer it in the directions she chooses, rather than let herself be battered by the winds of fate. If she does, she can turn a bad situation to her advantage and realize her own power.

Then Hanged Man is also very significant, being another Major Arcana. Sometimes called, The Three-fold Death," it signifies sacrifice and a willingness to place others before one's self in order to achieve the betterment of all. The seeker my put her own dreams and desires, hopes and fears aside and face what's in front of her with fortitude, knowing she may lose herself in the process.

The nine of swords is another tough card. It means battle. A struggle is coming which the seeker may not survive. However, because it is minor arcana, this card is less important than others. It's important not to focus on the battle, because that can intensify fear and make one forget that the real issue here is transformation, self-sacrifice and growth.

The nine of cups is an odd choice, I think. It's a wish-fulfillment card. Generally it is taken to mean a good outcome, but there's always the danger of fooling one's self and letting one's own desires rule one's actions. It also carries the idea of having a feast spread before you and needing to choose between options. Sometimes it signifies gluttony. If you want to show a positive outcome in this reading, I'd consider the ten of cups, or even The World. Oh, and cups rule emotion. So the nine of cups basically means, at the end of everything you're going to feel really good, but there's still a question as to whether you've accomplished anything real.

In summary: Your MC is in a dangerous, nightmarish position. A big change is coming in her life. To overcome the obstacles before her, she must confront them without thought of her own welfare. There will be strife, but the danger to her person is less than the danger to her soul if she doesn't choose the right path. IN the end, it's likely things will turn out all right.

Hope this helps.

WW

THAT was exactly what I needed! Exactly! And its perfect too!

wysewomon
04-21-2010, 08:42 PM
Glad to be of service! :D

WW

third person
04-22-2010, 01:41 AM
Liking this thread already. Obviously :)

shaldna
04-22-2010, 12:19 PM
It depends on the placement of the cards in the spread, the type of spread you are using, the situation you are in now, which way up the cards are, the general feel of the cards, the reader

each spread is unique to each person, and reading cards is a skill that takes years to learn.

Rowan
04-22-2010, 02:17 PM
Out of curiosity, what deck is she using? :)

YAwriter72
04-23-2010, 04:32 PM
Out of curiosity, what deck is she using? :)


Her Gram is a lifelong psychic and tarot reader, so she has a very special deck that was made specifically for her as a gift from an old friend. :)

emilycross
04-23-2010, 05:28 PM
Perhaps 'the tower' would be better instead of the death card

I don't know how it affects the reading wysewoman gave (which is brilliant) but I know that it's the most negative card in the pack

Rowan
04-29-2010, 04:44 AM
Her Gram is a lifelong psychic and tarot reader, so she has a very special deck that was made specifically for her as a gift from an old friend. :)

I like it! :)