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zona
04-14-2010, 08:54 PM
Hi everyone, this is my first post! The occasion isn't great for it, but I'd love some advice. After my first submissions to agents for my first novel, I got requests for a partial and 4 fulls. I got a form rejection for a full a few weeks ago. Then yesterday, a very very prominent agent at one of the biggest agencies (basically, anyone's dream agent) e-mailed me another rejection on a full. The thing is, it was full of wonderful, specific compliments about my writing and all the stuff about it that she liked. Then, at the very end, she basically said my main character's motivations are too vague and I should consider changing the POV of the novel. So a few questions:
1) Do I revise based on her expertise?
2) If so, do I resubmit to her (she didn't tell me to...she left it with the standard stuff about her not being the right agent but she's sure I'll find one, etc.)
3) Do I just keep it the way it is (I like the way it is) and hope that someone else thinks it's fine right now...
I'm this crazy mix of happy (for the nice words) and disappointed at the missed opportunity. Any words of wisdom would help...

Tasmin21
04-14-2010, 09:11 PM
First off, since you have other pages out there, I would wait and see if anyone else comes back with similar feedback. This thing is subjective (you'll get SO tired of hearing that) and it could simply be one person's taste.

For example: I had one revise/resubmit request come back saying that they loved the plot, but didn't like the main character. I had another one come back saying that they loved the main character, but didn't like the plot. I chose not to change anything, and found someone who loved it just the way it was.

Second: If you do revise, there's no harm in shooting her an e-mail saying "Hey, I did this on your recommendation, would you like to see it again?" The worst she can say is no.

Roly
04-14-2010, 09:24 PM
I agree with Tasmin. I also think in the mean time you can open up a new document and start experimenting. Rewrite a few key scenes from a different POV and see how you feel about it, or if it makes the scene different and/or better.

cate townsend
04-15-2010, 12:44 AM
I agree with Tasmin's advice, and with Roly's suggestion to experiment. Can't hurt. Sometimes the act of bringing it to life and seeing it on paper will make it more clear which way you should go.

mccardey
04-15-2010, 01:03 AM
Congratulations though!!! What exciting feedback!! It sounds like you can really, you know, write!!!

Don't forget to take a moment or two to just be thrilled!