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stitchingirl
04-14-2010, 07:31 PM
One of my character's has bipolar. I would like to include some examples of the mania, but I can't seem to find any. I don't need the descriptions of the mania, but the actual behaviour itself.

There were the times when MC did...
Or the times when MC....

behaviour examples.

Can anyone help?

shadowwalker
04-14-2010, 08:13 PM
A good friend of mine was bipolar - in her manic stages, she would do things like go on spending sprees (meaning a lot of bounced checks), find everything she or others said to be hysterically funny, get loud and aggressive at the first hint of disagreement with her or slights to her friends/family, bait her doctors with threats of what she was going to do to herself, got into physical altercations with the police - basically, the brakes were off. Consequently, she spent a lot of time under involuntary commitment.

stitchingirl
04-14-2010, 08:36 PM
Thanks, shadowwalker. :)

scarletpeaches
04-14-2010, 08:38 PM
You feel immortal. Like a fucking superhero. So. Much. Energy. You don't know what to do with it. You just have to burn it somehow. Clean house at 3am, go for a run, a jog, sit there with your knees jiggling, chewing nails, gnashing teeth. You're never still.

Mr Flibble
04-14-2010, 08:42 PM
When I'm manic I:

Talk so fast people can't understand me ( my brain whizzes around at eleventy billion miles an hour too, so I jump subjects a lot in ways that confuse other people)

Make plans to emigrate because 'Gods damn it I want some adventure!'

Get shirty with people who do not want adventure.

Drink / smoke a lot

Can't sit still. I have to be doing something. Sleep is for wimps.

Feel invulnerable - this can lead to very risky behaviour which I give absolutely no thought to whatsoever. Pfft, I'm invulnerable, right?

Make wild plans to do up the house / garden/ motorbike. Spend lots on getting stuff to do it. Fail to do it too usually :D Or I may decide taht what my life really needs is Expensive Gizmo A.

Listen to the voices....( I get auditory hallucinations. They shout a lot)

PGK
04-14-2010, 08:57 PM
I have a cousin who is bipolar. A specific example of something he did in a manic state:

A motorcycle on a small Greek island zipped past him while he was driving his car. At first he wanted to race with it but couldn't get past it. Then he decided to bump its rear tire with his bumper and chased the guy relentlessly until the motorcycle disappeared between other cars. He swears he wasn't angry at all, just felt like playing with the motorcycle.

Another example: His parents owned three factories producing plastics for toy and cookware companies. He purchased some sort of machine on the company credit card that cost in excesses of $50,000. The machine had nothing to do with his parents' company but he thought it was a good purchase nonetheless.

He's also had several other spending sprees that led nowhere: e.g. Bought a Harley Davidson lot and then decided he didn't care enough about it to keep it open. He bought two large motorcycles to take his girlfriend on a road trip through Europe and then decided against it. Borrowed 9 million (using the factories as collateral) to start his own senior citizen condominium real estate venture . . . just as the real estate market crashed. Guess how many condos he's built (none and never will).

He's also been "arrested" for midnight rollerblading in his underwear and for dangerously flying a helicopter (he was chasing birds over farms with the intent of getting them caught in the blades).

Other than those big events I've also seen him talk a mile a minute and fidget like he's on cocaine.

Then the depression hits and we all gather around him to convince him death isn't the answer.

johnnysannie
04-14-2010, 09:09 PM
These examples may be more extreme that what you want but years ago I had a client who was bi-polar. If things got too stressful or he became angry, he would sometimes rip his clothing - literally tear his shirt, say, into shreds. On one notable occasion he tossed a wooden dining chair through a large window too. He would also starting talking very, very fast at times.

stitchingirl
04-14-2010, 10:37 PM
Thanks, you guys. All this is such useful information.

God bless AW and you guys! :D

KTC
04-14-2010, 10:44 PM
A good outward sign for me---besides the rapidity of speech, grandeur and spending, etc, etc---is when I begin to tap out syllables on my outer thighs when people are speaking. This goes one step further when the tapping is following the syllables of my thoughts. I also find that my fingers do a lot of dancing. I guess you could call these tics. Lightness on the toes happens too...too much energy to keep you grounded...floating lightly.

KTC
04-14-2010, 10:47 PM
The spending spree thing is pretty much universal. I once walked into a Jeep dealership and bought a brand new shiny Jeep. Because I saw the pretty red one outside. Had to have it. Man, I hated that thing. It was a silent witness.

StephanieFox
04-15-2010, 02:20 AM
1) Thinking that you're really really funny when you're just really really annoying.

2) No sleeping for you or anyone in the household. Wake up! Wake up!

3) Fast driving.

4) Very focused on tasks and very creative if in a mild manic state. Unable to focus and crazy acting in severe manic states.

5) In severe cases, delusions. One person I knew took off his pants and shat on the floor when he was unable to find a bathroom.

6) Sometimes, violence and criminal behavior. One person stole a car because he though the CIA had given it to him.

7) Lying. It's someone else's fault.

The person I knew would go in an eight month cycle, starting with severe depression which would lessen, passing normal for a few weeks on the way to severe mania.

When this was going on, I, the caretaker, found no one to help me until the cops would show up (and blame me) and then take him away to the hospital. Then let him loose and I'd have to take care of this person. They never kept him until he was sane. When I would warn his doctor that he was about to have another episode, he told me that I was the problem. Then this guy went off into another severe episode and the cycle started again. (This happened twice.)

Hope this helps.

ChristineR
04-15-2010, 02:48 AM
This is not me, it's a relative. Me, I'm unipolar depressed.

Getting angry with someone and attempting to kill them, with bare hands, even though the other person was much bigger and stronger (and fortunately, not into killing for self-defense). Spending sprees also--thousands of dollars of cosmetics in one day, yards and yards of fabric even though she can't sew, clothes, furniture, all sorts of things she didn't need and couldn't afford. Getting into fights. Walking home in a snowstorm in high heels.

The only unifying theme is that she thought she could do anything, even when it was obvious she couldn't.

shadowwalker
04-15-2010, 02:53 AM
They never kept him until he was sane.

By sane, I think you mean stable ;)


When I would warn his doctor that he was about to have another episode, he told me that I was the problem. Then this guy went off into another severe episode and the cycle started again. (This happened twice.)

That's my biggest complaint with the whole psych community - they won't listen. They won't listen to the clients, they won't listen to the clients' families. Unless, of course, you're agreeing with them 100%. But then I find the same problem with most doctors in most fields. :Soapbox:

KTC
04-15-2010, 04:19 AM
1) Thinking that you're really really funny when you're just really really annoying.

2) No sleeping for you or anyone in the household. Wake up! Wake up!

3) Fast driving.

4) Very focused on tasks and very creative if in a mild manic state. Unable to focus and crazy acting in severe manic states.

5) In severe cases, delusions. One person I knew took off his pants and shat on the floor when he was unable to find a bathroom.

6) Sometimes, violence and criminal behavior. One person stole a car because he though the CIA had given it to him.

7) Lying. It's someone else's fault.

The person I knew would go in an eight month cycle, starting with severe depression which would lessen, passing normal for a few weeks on the way to severe mania.

When this was going on, I, the caretaker, found no one to help me until the cops would show up (and blame me) and then take him away to the hospital. Then let him loose and I'd have to take care of this person. They never kept him until he was sane. When I would warn his doctor that he was about to have another episode, he told me that I was the problem. Then this guy went off into another severe episode and the cycle started again. (This happened twice.)

Hope this helps.

Oh my god. you nailed it. that's from the outside looking in...i recognize it as someone on the inside looking out. that's frightening. seriously.

DrZoidberg
04-15-2010, 12:10 PM
I'm just being curious now. I have a friend who's bipolar. He pretty much fits what's been said here. He's a freelance journalist and an author. He's also started some Internet start-ups. He's told me that the reason why has had the jobs he has is because of him being bipolar. He needs to have a job where he can work super hard for short periods and then drop everything for a while and it won't screw his life up. He said that writing is the perfect job for it.

So my question is. Is it very common that writers are bipolar? And if so are they writers because of it? I'm not. I just like writing.

OneWriter
04-15-2010, 05:10 PM
Wikipedia has a page with that:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_affected_by_bipolar_disorder

Famous people, I counted ten writers off that list.
I do know of Virginia Wolf, Edgar Allan Poe, and Patricia Cornwell.

A psychologist friend of mine tells me that lately bipolar has been over-diagnosed. This is her opinion, not mine, but, from looking at the number of patients that come to her office claiming that they have been diagnosed with the condition, she believes that many aren't real.

kuwisdelu
04-15-2010, 05:14 PM
Think of what you want to do right now.

But don't think about it.

You just happen.

Albedo
04-15-2010, 05:32 PM
Former housemate:

Digging ditches. For weeks on end our front and back yards were like a construction site. Front yard: decided front path needed parallel drainage ditch to prevent rain washing topsoil onto the path. Telephone cables torn and exposed to weather. I had to lie to the phone company to get them fixed. Topsoil ended up on path. Back yard: decided small patch of bare earth was too lumpy, excavated down to the bedrock. Disposed of spoil over back fence into rear neighbour's courtyard. Flirted with neighbour when he came around to wtf.

Mr Flibble
04-15-2010, 05:45 PM
Wikipedia has a page with that:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_affected_by_bipolar_disorder

Famous people, I counted ten writers off that list.
I do know of Virginia Wolf, Edgar Allan Poe, and Patricia Cornwell.

A psychologist friend of mine tells me that lately bipolar has been over-diagnosed. This is her opinion, not mine, but, from looking at the number of patients that come to her office claiming that they have been diagnosed with the condition, she believes that many aren't real.

I was talking about this with my doc. She said, yes it has led to over-diagnosis ( the Stepehn Fry effect, after his documentary, but that also led to people who hadn't known being diagnosed, like myself. I am clearly bipolar, always knew something was odd but didn't want to to admit it. Then my hubby watched the doc and said 'That's you, that is'. I denied it....until I had a major episode that was, um, undeniable. It's made a lot of sense of some seriously weird episodes of my life)

She also said that people with bipolar tend to be creative because of the mania and so involve themselves in the arts ( even if just as a hobby)

Wiskel
04-15-2010, 06:04 PM
A psychologist friend of mine tells me that lately bipolar has been over-diagnosed. This is her opinion, not mine, but, from looking at the number of patients that come to her office claiming that they have been diagnosed with the condition, she believes that many aren't real.


I've lost count of the number of parents who've wanted a diagnosis of bipolar in the last few years for their kids, and it started about 4 years ago. They used to arrive saying their child had ADHD, then it became ADHD or bipolar illness.

There was a real american trend towards suggesting a lot of teenage and childish behaviour might be bipolar. Thankfully it's quietened down a bit but I sometimes think google has a lot to answer for. It's frighteningly easy now to research behavioural problems on the net and find links that suggest your child has bipolar illness....sort of a critical mass of information on bipolar illness that starts to guide thinking rather than just inform it.

Craig

backslashbaby
04-16-2010, 03:41 AM
Other than what has already been said above, someone I know will become the biggest know-it-all on the face of the earth! She'll literally think she knows more than any doctor, for instance, about every condition. She'll actually say that if she's in that manic mood. She has several manic moods; many are really obnoxious!

DrummerGirl
04-17-2010, 07:24 AM
I had a friend who cut off all her hair (to the scalp) while manic because she "totally didnt need it anymore." She was horrified once the mania wore off.

Another friend, a lovely christian family man, was hospitalised before reaching full mania, then reached it while in there. He had sex with many of the other patients because he was Jesus Christ and needed to spread his perfect genes to help save a dying world.

My uncle thought he was invincible and could fly. He threw himself into Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra during a storm and ended up drowning.

Once I stayed awake for over 100 hours during which I thought and said many profound things. I made plans to invent things and had moments of actualisation that I thought would change the way people percieve the world. I wrote music and played my guitar outside in the middle of the night. I thought I was someone special and chosen to usher the world into a new era. I went to a social event and was very hyper. My friends were in stitches and my husband was in a state of suspended disbelief and shock at the things I was blurting out. he kept kicking me under the table trying to get me to shut up, but I only talked louder and faster, because, dammit, I had the most brilliant things to say and he wasnt going to stop me. I saw my boss and went up to him and punched him hard in the arm, jovially, of course. I punched him hard enough that he swayed. I am normally very reverent and formal with him. My husband took me away before I could do more damage :)

Oh: and on a side note, Last year I read: Catch me When I Fall - Nicci French. It's set over a period of days during which the main character is manic. I thought they (the authors) portrayed the mania really well, I was impressed :D

stitchingirl
04-17-2010, 04:16 PM
All this information has been very helpful. :)

blackrose602
04-19-2010, 06:34 AM
My ex-husband:

1) Taking things apart. Computers, telephones, random junk... if it didn't work, it had to be "fixed" rather than trashed. He left trails of random bits of metal up and down the halls and, of course, never put anything back together.

2) Picking stupid and random fights. We're sitting on the floor doing a jigsaw puzzle. Him: "I love you." Me: "I love you too." Him: "Are you sure? You didn't say it right/fast enough/in the right tone. Do you really love me or are you just saying that?" Me: "Of course I love you." Him: "Oh, now you're just being sarcastic. You think I'm stupid. Guess I'm too stupid to do this puzzle too." Proceeds to rip puzzle apart and throw pieces around the room before stomping out of the house.

3) Utterly self-centered. He happened to enter a manic phase right before my mom passed away unexpectedly. Two days after she died, we're alone in the car. My aunt and uncle have just arrived from out of town and I've left my desperately distraught father in their care. One of my mom's favorite songs comes on the radio and I start crying quietly. Him: "What the hell's wrong with you? It's been two days! I've had to put up with you and your damn father, and now we need to talk about my problem..."

Not fun to live with, and he absolutely refused treatment of any kind.

Shady Lane
04-19-2010, 07:37 AM
No idea what it looks like from the outside, but--not sleeping, not eating, writing books in five days (haha), EXTREME paranoia, sort of "ants in your pants" feeling--shifting around a lot when you're sitting or standing, because no position feels "right." Chewing on the inside of your mouth, taking a lot of showers, acting very frustrated that no one understands you and that other people don't have the same energy you have.

stitchingirl
04-19-2010, 05:03 PM
Can they become physically abusive?

Because some of what blackrose described sounds a lot like my ex-boyfriend. Idiot would do the same thing. If I told him that I loved him, I was saying it wrong. If something was wrong with me (the best example was postpartum depression), he would get mad at me. I couldn't explain to him why those old Hallmark card commercials made me cry. But if I did, then it was "Oh, here we go. It's all about you, isn't it? Crying just to gain sympathy."

When I was in labor with my daughter (she's his daughter only by blood, no other reason/connection), he actually left me a few times. Me being in pain was starting to grate on his nerves.

Maybe he wasn't just being an idiot, but is bipolar. But his whole family makes those on "Jerry Springer" seem normal.

blackrose602
04-19-2010, 06:49 PM
It's entirely possible, stitchingirl. My ex's mother was reasonably sane, and had left his father many years ago. The father and sister? Yeah, Springer families had nothing on them. We had a friend, a guy in his late 40s, who had been just like my ex, a young know-it-all who flatly refused treatment for his own bipolar. After losing his wife, his kids, his house, his career, pretty much everything, he had a hard talk with my ex--tried to tell him that it wasn't too late for him, that with meds and hard work he could get things under control and not ruin his own life. The jerk listened intently, nodded and smiled...

And proceeded to run out the door in the middle of the night less than a month after my mom died, taking our pets, everything I owned and everything I'd inherited from her with him. Moved in with an ex of his, married her within days of our divorce, and ran out on her two years later. The irony? He'd sold me a huge line about how horrid she was, and her the same line about me. She's actually a wonderful person and we're friends today.

DavidZahir
04-19-2010, 07:41 PM
I should point out that my late fiancee and a therapist both thought I was mildly bipolar, and frankly my swings were nothing like described here. Enthusiasms and periods of great energy, sure--but nothing dangerous nor did I spend more money than I had. On the other end, it sometimes takes all I've got not to burst into tears.

Needless to say, when I had a genuine reason for sadness it was much, much worse. After my beautiful lady's passing, there eventually came a time when I literally did nothing at all for 72 hours until someone came over and pulled me out to a dance class.

stitchingirl
04-20-2010, 05:00 PM
What are the signs to look for? My daughter is 18 years old. She's sometimes moody and keeps to herself.

What are the signs to look out for? Her biological hasn't been diagnosed as bipolar, but it might explain some of his behaviour, outside of the abusive nature.

I guess what I'm asking is how to determine what is just normal teenage behaviour and what is might be bipolar behaviour?

shadowwalker
04-20-2010, 05:53 PM
What are the signs to look for? My daughter is 18 years old. She's sometimes moody and keeps to herself.

What are the signs to look out for? Her biological hasn't been diagnosed as bipolar, but it might explain some of his behaviour, outside of the abusive nature.

I guess what I'm asking is how to determine what is just normal teenage behaviour and what is might be bipolar behaviour?

Teens are more difficult to diagnose - they don't always manifest the same signs as adults; they also tend to cycle much more rapidly than adults. It could be the disorder, it could be just being a teenager, so the doctor would take a very detailed history - not just physical history but family and social history. A thorough physical would be needed, to rule out other disorders/problems, and then she would have to be observed over a long period of time.

But it's wise, IMHO, to be very cautious about diagnosing bipolar in teens. Not only because of the "it's just that stage" thing, but also because some of the medications that may be prescribed could cause their own problems. Anti-depressants, for example, can actually make teens more depressed and suicidal.

ChristineR
04-20-2010, 07:04 PM
Can they become physically abusive?

Because some of what blackrose described sounds a lot like my ex-boyfriend. Idiot would do the same thing. If I told him that I loved him, I was saying it wrong. If something was wrong with me (the best example was postpartum depression), he would get mad at me. I couldn't explain to him why those old Hallmark card commercials made me cry. But if I did, then it was "Oh, here we go. It's all about you, isn't it? Crying just to gain sympathy."

When I was in labor with my daughter (she's his daughter only by blood, no other reason/connection), he actually left me a few times. Me being in pain was starting to grate on his nerves.

Maybe he wasn't just being an idiot, but is bipolar. But his whole family makes those on "Jerry Springer" seem normal.

Bipolar people could certainly be physically abusive, but those behaviors sound like being a jerk to me. Lots of people have trouble understanding others emotions, or being around people in extreme pain. The essence of bipolar is that he cycles from depressed to manic--either happy mania or irritated, violent mania. You can pretty much get an idea of the range of mania from this thread.

Don Allen
04-20-2010, 07:32 PM
Sever cases can border 'psychotic delusional' as described by some but all Bi-polar cases have one thing in common, and that is the ability function "normally" (what ever your definition of that may be) which is why medication generally works so well with those suffering from the disorder.

The common denominator does seem to be the disconnect between reality and perceived reality which is sometimes hard to define in mild or moderate cases.

backslashbaby
04-21-2010, 01:49 AM
Yes, I'd beware of taking the hostility part as its own symptom of bipolar. The girl I know has incredible rages, and it's true that she's more irritable in many of her manic states. But it's the rest of the symptoms that say bipolar.

She's Borderline Personality Disorder along with Bipolar, btw... and not the first person I've met with that grouping.

I don't know that there is any reason to believe that a bipolar person would have to act jerkish -- manic, sure -- but that could be amusing and fun, for that matter.

The incredible energy in periods combined with at least occassional periods of inactivity/depression are the biggest signs, imho.

shadowwalker
04-21-2010, 02:12 AM
Yes, I'd beware of taking the hostility part as its own symptom of bipolar.

Definitely agree. Even my friend, with a penchant for getting into fights with cops, was not aggressive, per se. Her actions came not out of wish to fight, but out of extremely high frustration. She knew nobody really understood why she did the things she did, and the cops (in general) were tired of dealing with her - the combination pushed her past her limits.

There are bipolar people who are jerks - but there are plenty more jerks who are not bipolar.

stitchingirl
04-21-2010, 04:30 AM
I don't think my daughter has BP as she hasn't been moody like she was for quite some time (last year, I think). Right now, she's as happy as a clam since she got her new cell phone and texts all her friends.

As for her biological, maybe he isn't BP, as he never seemed happy about anything. Even if it was something he wanted, it still wasn't good enough. I just chalk it to another idiot who doesn't know how to keep his hands to himself.

I thank you so much for answering my questions about this topic.

blackrose602
04-21-2010, 06:49 AM
I should point out that my late fiancee and a therapist both thought I was mildly bipolar, and frankly my swings were nothing like described here. Enthusiasms and periods of great energy, sure--but nothing dangerous nor did I spend more money than I had. On the other end, it sometimes takes all I've got not to burst into tears.

Needless to say, when I had a genuine reason for sadness it was much, much worse. After my beautiful lady's passing, there eventually came a time when I literally did nothing at all for 72 hours until someone came over and pulled me out to a dance class.

Without pretending to diagnose over the internet, it's possible that you're cyclothymic (which I am). It's on the bipolar spectrum, but much milder than full-blown bipolar. The "manic" phases are actually hypomania, which is a period of high energy and intense focus. A lot of creative people have it, and attribute their success to the hypomania. Likewise, the depressive episodes are milder than those of full-blown bipolar, and in some ways a relief from the intensity of hypomania. No idea if you have it or not, but it's a possibility based on what you said.

maverickguy
05-06-2010, 09:35 PM
Sometimes a get a tickle in the left side of my head. I dont know if its adrenaline flowing or what. But thats kind of a warning sign and then after that watch out.

Usually Im sitting and kinda joking or going back and forth or telling someone to stop messing around and they dont understand. They take it a step too far then my head gets that little tickle and Im not very pretty after that.

maverickguy
05-06-2010, 09:37 PM
I have a cousin who is bipolar. A specific example of something he did in a manic state:

A motorcycle on a small Greek island zipped past him while he was driving his car. At first he wanted to race with it but couldn't get past it. Then he decided to bump its rear tire with his bumper and chased the guy relentlessly until the motorcycle disappeared between other cars. He swears he wasn't angry at all, just felt like playing with the motorcycle.

Another example: His parents owned three factories producing plastics for toy and cookware companies. He purchased some sort of machine on the company credit card that cost in excesses of $50,000. The machine had nothing to do with his parents' company but he thought it was a good purchase nonetheless.

He's also had several other spending sprees that led nowhere: e.g. Bought a Harley Davidson lot and then decided he didn't care enough about it to keep it open. He bought two large motorcycles to take his girlfriend on a road trip through Europe and then decided against it. Borrowed 9 million (using the factories as collateral) to start his own senior citizen condominium real estate venture . . . just as the real estate market crashed. Guess how many condos he's built (none and never will).

He's also been "arrested" for midnight rollerblading in his underwear and for dangerously flying a helicopter (he was chasing birds over farms with the intent of getting them caught in the blades).

Other than those big events I've also seen him talk a mile a minute and fidget like he's on cocaine.

Then the depression hits and we all gather around him to convince him death isn't the answer.

is he on cocaine? That sounds kind of spoiled. has he been to jail ever? Maybe that would help...

PGK
05-07-2010, 06:20 AM
Cocaine, no (that I know of anyway), spoiled . . . hell yes! But he's been properly diagnosed by several psychiatrists as Bipolar. After each diagnosis, however, he swears they're all idiots and refuses the medication because Lithium failed him many years ago.

He's spent a few nights in jail, but never prison. Though I doubt it would really help because a cell is not a cure or treatment for psychiatric disorders (that I know of). Last time he attempted suicide he had his parents to take care of him until the depression was replaced by yet another manic state. Now they're both dead and he's alienated all other family so. . .

Canotila
05-07-2010, 08:30 AM
Can they become physically abusive?

Because some of what blackrose described sounds a lot like my ex-boyfriend. Idiot would do the same thing. If I told him that I loved him, I was saying it wrong. If something was wrong with me (the best example was postpartum depression), he would get mad at me. I couldn't explain to him why those old Hallmark card commercials made me cry. But if I did, then it was "Oh, here we go. It's all about you, isn't it? Crying just to gain sympathy."

When I was in labor with my daughter (she's his daughter only by blood, no other reason/connection), he actually left me a few times. Me being in pain was starting to grate on his nerves.

Maybe he wasn't just being an idiot, but is bipolar. But his whole family makes those on "Jerry Springer" seem normal.

One of my friends finally cut off all contact with her mother, until her mother decides to start taking meds again. The last time they saw each other her mom was stabbing butcher knives into the wall, screaming that she was going to kill the people in the wall. She also killed my friends cat by throwing it out in subzero weather because she thought it was a demon. That was the last straw for my friend. Though, I don't know if bipolar is her only diagnosis or if there are other things going on too. When she was having episodes she would verbally abuse her children (basically blame them for her illness, as a nice way of saying it).

Mom'sWrite
05-07-2010, 09:02 AM
the ex liked to shop, huge spending sprees on new stuff, used stuff, broken stuff, and useless stuff. If one was good, ten must be better. Packed a 7000 sq. ft. house and garage to the rafters with stuff. To him, all of it was necessary to the existence of life on this planet, even if he didn't know exactly what it was.

He also lies, little lies, big lies, fabulous, fantastic, utterly unbelievable fabrications that in some weird way he thinks is the truth. Delusional, oh yes. He once told me that he owned his cousin's house and an expensive new car, he just let his cousin live there and use the car while he lived in a small apartment and drove an much older car. He was a prince like that.

Paranoid up the wazoo. Everyone was jealous of his amazing abilities and his stuff. All his male friends wanted me. I was not to be trusted around anyone with a penis because my need to have sex with them was so obvious. Our phones were bugged and our house was watched, even from above. He purchased an arsenal of weapons against the impending food riots, attempted to put a tracking device on my car so he could follow me to clandestine meetings with my lovers, and stole all my lingerie so he could, as he said, "Get DNA samples" from them.

Engage in crazy, risky behaviors, road rage, emotional abuse, rage over the most minor things. Called our four year daughter some filthy names and attempted to hit her because she would not put on a jacket that matched her pants. She wanted to wear another jacket that day.

Talk a blue streak about himself.

And never, ever sleep on a normal cycle.

The one thing I never did get were the eagles. He continually claimed to see a pair of nesting eagles over a 3 year period. There were no eagles, at least now where he insisted they were nesting.

The worst part is that he won't admit there's a problem. He's fine and in control. Isn't it obvious?