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View Full Version : Procrastinators - do you think a contract with a publisher would cure you?



lucyvp
04-13-2010, 09:51 AM
Those who are published, does the knowledge that your WIP will most likely be published make it easier to keep working on it?

Nivarion
04-13-2010, 09:53 AM
If there is money on the line, I've got all the time in the world. :D

CAWriter
04-13-2010, 11:54 AM
A contract makes a difference for me because there's an actual deadline attached. I'm not good at writing 'on spec' or just for the fun of it, but if I know someone is actually waiting for what I'm producing, I'm good at meeting those expectations.

lucyvp
04-13-2010, 01:07 PM
Kind of like having a uni assignment due - I always knuckled down at the last minute to do them. Do you think there's really a cure for procrastination?

Paul
04-13-2010, 01:14 PM
It makes a difference for me. Deadlines are the only way I can work, long as there's a little give.

Course, you need to develop the habit of writing before that day happens, no point saying 'i've no contract, so no point'

shaldna
04-13-2010, 03:08 PM
I think it could, but for some people it won't make any difference at all.

kuwisdelu
04-13-2010, 03:13 PM
I thought one needed a deadline before procrastination was possible in the first place.

Oops.

Namatu
04-13-2010, 05:44 PM
Oh no, I can procrastinate with or without a deadline.

CheekyWench
04-13-2010, 06:02 PM
eh.. I'll answer later.

Jamesaritchie
04-13-2010, 07:10 PM
Those who are published, does the knowledge that your WIP will most likely be published make it easier to keep working on it?

This is like asking does the knoweldge that you'll be fired from your day job if you don't show up for work make it easier to keep working.

The knowledge that I've already taken part of the money, and won't get the rest, makes it a heck of a lot easier to keep working.

On teh other side of that cliched coin, I've always assumed that when I find myself procrastinating, it's usually because I'm doing something I don't really want to be doing, and not doing something I do want to be doing.

Life is short, and I'm a firm believer in only doing things I love doing so much that I can't wait to get at it.

Jamesaritchie
04-13-2010, 07:11 PM
Kind of like having a uni assignment due - I always knuckled down at the last minute to do them. Do you think there's really a cure for procrastination?

Turn it around. Start procrastinating on procrastination.

icerose
04-13-2010, 07:12 PM
The only cure for procrastination is discipline. You have to build good habits.

ChaosTitan
04-14-2010, 01:14 AM
The only cure for procrastination is discipline. You have to build good habits.

You beat me to it. So yeah, what icerose said.

gothicangel
04-14-2010, 01:41 AM
The only cure for procrastination is discipline. You have to build good habits.

I third this.

It's all to do with my personal drive.

Last week for example, I worked 53 hours over six days (plus another 12 hours for commuting), came home and wrote my Uni essay.

I put it down to discipline and drive . . . and yes I feel knackered. :D

mccardey
04-14-2010, 02:12 AM
I prefer not to think of it as procrastination. I call it ironing.... ;)

Jamesaritchie
04-14-2010, 02:54 AM
The only cure for procrastination is discipline. You have to build good habits.

Or be doing something you love enough that procrastination isn't an issue. I never see anyone procrastinate on computer games, or on anything else they consider really fun.

jana13k
04-14-2010, 04:49 AM
I am procrastinating right now or I wouldn't be here. I'm the queen of procrastination. I also work VERY fast, and that's a big part of my problem. I know I can crunch at the end and still get everything done and done well. I try to force myself to a daily schedule and do okay sometimes, but I have found that I'm not good when spread out.

For example, I have to go to my day job, so that leaves only so much time for novel-writing, freelance writing, exercise and other. I gave up other and exercise, but I can't seem to get a handle on freelance writing and novel writing on the same day. It's like I'm spread too thin. I do better if I can concentrate on one big thing for large amounts of time, meaning write on the book every morning and night for weeks, THEN switch to articles day and night.

Maybe I'm just weird.

Claudia Gray
04-14-2010, 05:10 AM
The knowledge of a rock-solid deadline does have a tendency to push me ahead, yeah. On any given day I might procrastinate a lot, but I treat writing as my job, now.

lucyvp
04-15-2010, 01:38 AM
Or be doing something you love enough that procrastination isn't an issue. I never see anyone procrastinate on computer games, or on anything else they consider really fun.

I love writing but the bit that stops me is when I've finished a scene and I have to start a new one. I can never just decide how to start it. I look at it from every angle as though I'm studying a specimen, then I chew it over - usually by either sitting there playing Bejewelled (I get a better score if I'm thinking about something else while playing!) or taking a bath. Starting a scene and finding the right angle to use and the right word is the hardest part for me, so I usually end up procrastinating over it.

willietheshakes
04-15-2010, 02:05 AM
(counts "blown deadline" notches above desk)

Apparently not.

scarletpeaches
04-15-2010, 02:20 AM
I sell book-by-book (at this point in my career) so deadlines aren't an issue...but if I want to eat and pay the bills each month, I kinda need to keep writing. So I have outside deadlines, if you will.

I definitely work better with some form of structure/deadline/timetable.

One other thing a contract does for me is validate what I'm doing. I know I can sell a book. I've done it. So there's no earthly reason why the book I'm writing now won't sell too. I think I carry myself differently. Whether other people see it or not I don't know.

So contracts for me aren't so much about motivation as validation.

happywritermom
04-15-2010, 02:31 AM
I'll have to ask my agent to hurry up and get one for me so I can let you know. :D